Antony Walker

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Sir Antony Walker
Born (1934-05-16) 16 May 1934 (age 84)
AllegianceFlag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom
Service/branchFlag of the British Army.svg  British Army
Years of service1954–1992
Rank General
Commands held 1st Royal Tank Regiment
11th Armoured Brigade
3rd Armoured Division
Battles/wars The Troubles
Awards Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath
Mentioned in Despatches

General Sir Antony Kenneth Frederick Walker KCB (born 16 May 1934) is a former British Army officer who became Commandant of the Royal College of Defence Studies.

General is the highest rank currently achievable by serving officers of the British Army. The rank can also be held by Royal Marines officers in tri-service posts, for example, General Sir Gordon Messenger the Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff. It ranks above lieutenant-general and, in the Army, is subordinate to the rank of field marshal, which is now only awarded as an honorary rank. The rank of general has a NATO-code of OF-9, and is a four-star rank. It is equivalent to a full admiral in the Royal Navy or an air chief marshal in the Royal Air Force.

British Army land warfare branch of the British Armed Forces of the United Kingdom

The British Army is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2018, the British Army comprises just over 81,500 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 27,000 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.

The Commandant of the Royal College of Defence Studies was a UK senior serving military officer between 1972 and 2001. The post rotated through the three branches of the armed forces in turn. In 1971 the old Imperial Defence College became the Royal College of Defence Studies. In 1991, the post was downgraded to three-star, and then in 2001, it was opened up to competition through public advertisement. Subsequent incumbents were all senior retired military officers, until the appointment of a diplomat in 2014.

Military career

Educated at Merchant Taylors' School, Walker attended Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, and was commissioned into the Royal Tank Regiment in 1954. [1] [2] He served in Northern Ireland during the Troubles and was mentioned in despatches. [3] He was appointed Commanding Officer of 1st Royal Tank Regiment in 1974 and Commander of 11th Armoured Brigade in 1978. [4] He went on to be General Officer Commanding 3rd Armoured Division in 1982, Chief of Staff at Headquarters UK Land Forces in 1985 and Deputy Chief of Defence Staff (Commitments) at the Ministry of Defence in 1987. [4] His last appointment was as Commandant of the Royal College of Defence Studies in 1990 before he retired in 1992. [4]

Merchant Taylors School, Northwood independent day school for boys, originally in London, now at Northwood, Hertfordshire

Merchant Taylors' School (MTS) is a British independent private day school for boys. Since 1933 it has been on 285 acres (115 ha) of grounds at Sandy Lodge in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire.

Royal Tank Regiment British Army tank unit

The Royal Tank Regiment (RTR) is the oldest tank unit in the world, being formed by the British Army in 1916 during the Great War. Today, it is the armoured regiment of the British Army's 1st Armoured Infantry Brigade. Formerly known as the Tank Corps and the Royal Tank Corps, it is part of the Royal Armoured Corps.

Northern Ireland Part of the United Kingdom lying in the north-east of the island of Ireland, created 1921

Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom in the north-east of the island of Ireland, variously described as a country, province or region. Northern Ireland shares a border to the south and west with the Republic of Ireland. In 2011, its population was 1,810,863, constituting about 30% of the island's total population and about 3% of the UK's population. Established by the Northern Ireland Act 1998 as part of the Good Friday Agreement, the Northern Ireland Assembly holds responsibility for a range of devolved policy matters, while other areas are reserved for the British government. Northern Ireland co-operates with the Republic of Ireland in some areas, and the Agreement granted the Republic the ability to "put forward views and proposals" with "determined efforts to resolve disagreements between the two governments".

Walker was knighted in 1987. [5]

In retirement Walker was Director-General of the British Institute of Facilities Management 1998–2001, [2] and Communications Director for Aqumen Facilities Management, then a subsidiary of Mowlem. [6]

The Institute of Workplace and Facilities Management is a United Kingdom-based professional association for the facilities management sector.

Mowlem construction and civil engineering company

Mowlem was one of the largest construction and civil engineering companies in the United Kingdom. Carillion bought the firm in 2006.

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References

  1. "No. 40292". The London Gazette (Supplement). 5 October 1954. p. 5630.
  2. 1 2 WALKER, Gen. Sir Antony (Kenneth Frederick), Who's Who 2016, A & C Black, 2016 (online edition, Oxford University Press, 2015, accessed 17 Nov 2016)
  3. "No. 46614". The London Gazette . 24 June 1975. p. 8052.
  4. 1 2 3 Debrett's People of Today 1994
  5. "No. 50948". The London Gazette (Supplement). 12 June 1987. p. 2.
  6. The Mask of Command, Building, 2002
Military offices
Preceded by
Norman Arthur
General Officer Commanding the 3rd Armoured Division
1982–1984
Succeeded by
David Ramsbotham
Preceded by
Sir John Woodward
Deputy Chief of the Defence Staff (Commitments)
1987–1989
Succeeded by
Sir Kenneth Hayr
Preceded by
Sir Michael Armitage
Commandant of the Royal College of Defence Studies
1990–1992
Succeeded by
Sir John Coward