Antuco (volcano)

Last updated
Antuco
Antuco Volcano.jpg
Highest point
Elevation 2,979 m (9,774 ft)
Coordinates 37°24′21″S71°20′57″W / 37.40583°S 71.34917°W / -37.40583; -71.34917
Geography
Relief Map of Chile.jpg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Antuco
Location of Antuco
in Chile
Location Chile
Parent range Andes
Geology
Mountain type Stratovolcano
Volcanic arc/belt South Volcanic Zone
Last eruption 1869
Climbing
First ascent 1829 by Eduard Poeppig

Antuco Volcano is a stratovolcano located in the Bío Bío Region of Chile, near Sierra Velluda and on the shore of Laguna del Laja.

Contents

Eruptions

The first registered eruption occurred in 1624 but its is known that the volcano experienced some activity in the 16th century. [1] The 1624 eruption was strombolian forming a lava flow and resulting the ejection of pyroclasts. [1] Beginning with this eruption many more were recorded as the volcano lied near an Andean mountain pass transited by the Spanish. [1]

2430 April 2013

In April 2013, there were reported signs of activity sighted by nearby inhabitants - a pilot even reported ash spewing from the volcano. The Volcanic Ash Advisory Center in Buenos Aires, Argentina, investigated and determined that only trace gases and steam had emerged from Antuco. [2]

In literature

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Petit-Breuilh 2004, p. 105.
  2. "Pronósticos de dispersión de Ceniza Volcánica". smn.gov.ar/vaac/buenosaires. VAAC. Retrieved 19 March 2015.

Bibliography