Appleton A. Mason

Last updated
Appleton A. Mason
AA Mason Tulane.jpg
Mason pictured in Jambalaya 1911, Tulane yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1880-06-11)June 11, 1880
Parrsboro, Nova Scotia
DiedDecember 20, 1938(1938-12-20) (aged 58)
New Rochelle, New York
Playing career
Football
1905 Springfield (MA)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1908–1909 Warrensburg Teachers
1910–1912 Tulane
1918 NYU
Basketball
1908–1910 Warrensburg Teachers
1912–1913 Tulane
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1908–1909 Warrensburg Teachers
1910–1913 Tulane
Head coaching record
Overall15–23–4 (football)
23–13 (basketball)

Appleton Adams Mason (June 11, 1880 – December 20, 1938) [1] was an American football player, coach of football and basketball, and physical education instructor. He served as the head football coach at Warrensburg Teachers Collegenow the University of Central Missouri (1908–1909), Tulane University (1910–1912), and New York University (1918), compiling a career college football record of 15–23–4. Mason was also the head basketball coach Warrensburg Teachers from 1908 to 1910 and at Tulane for the 1912–13 season, tallying a career college basketball mark of 23–13. He was born in Parrsboro, Nova Scotia, and died on December 20, 1938, in the New Rochelle Hospital in New Rochelle, New York. [2]

Contents

Involvement in Camp Agawam

Mason was the founder of Camp Agawam in Raymond, Maine. He founded the camp in 1919. Mason went to Crescent Lake in Raymond every summer. Following his death in 1938, he was succeeded as camp director in 1939 by his son, Appleton Mason, Jr. [3]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Warrensburg Teachers ()(1908–1909)
1908 Warrensburg Teachers2–3–1
1909 Warrensburg Teachers3–3–2
Warrensburg Teachers:5–6–3
Tulane Olive and Blue (Independent)(1910–present)
1910 Tulane 0–7
Tulane Olive and Blue (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1911–1912)
1911 Tulane 5–3–13–3T–8th
1912 Tulane 5–33–3T–8th
Tulane:10–13–16–6
NYU Violets (Independent)(1918)
1918 NYU 0–4
NYU:0–4
Total:15–23–4

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References

  1. New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957
  2. "Appleton A. Mason; Physical Education Instructor at Columbia University" (PDF). The New York Times . December 22, 1938. Retrieved November 4, 2011.
  3. Deborah Sayer (March 4, 2010). "Turning Boys Into Men". Portland Press Herald . Archived from the original on October 17, 2013. Retrieved March 14, 2013.