ArXiv

Last updated

arXiv
ArXiv web.svg
Type of site
Science
Available inEnglish
Owner Cornell University
Created by Paul Ginsparg
Website arxiv.org
Alexa rankIncrease Negative.svg 872 (As of 25 April 2019) [1]
CommercialNo
LaunchedAugust 14, 1991;27 years ago (1991-08-14)
Current statusOnline
ISSN 2331-8422
OCLC  number 228652809

arXiv (pronounced "archive"—the X represents the Greek letter chi [χ]) [2] is a repository of electronic preprints (known as e-prints) approved for posting after moderation, but not full peer review. It consists of scientific papers in the fields of mathematics, physics, astronomy, electrical engineering, computer science, quantitative biology, statistics, mathematical finance and economics, which can be accessed online. In many fields of mathematics and physics, almost all scientific papers are self-archived on the arXiv repository. Begun on August 14, 1991, arXiv.org passed the half-million-article milestone on October 3, 2008, [3] [4] and had hit a million by the end of 2014. [5] [6] By October 2016 the submission rate had grown to more than 10,000 per month. [6] [7]

Archive institution responsible for storing, preserving, describing, and providing access to historical records

An archive is an accumulation of historical records or the physical place they are located. Archives contain primary source documents that have accumulated over the course of an individual or organization's lifetime, and are kept to show the function of that person or organization. Professional archivists and historians generally understand archives to be records that have been naturally and necessarily generated as a product of regular legal, commercial, administrative, or social activities. They have been metaphorically defined as "the secretions of an organism", and are distinguished from documents that have been consciously written or created to communicate a particular message to posterity.

In academic publishing, a preprint is a version of a scholarly or scientific paper that precedes formal peer review and publication in a peer-reviewed scholarly or scientific journal. The preprint may be available, often as a non-typeset version available free, before and/or after a paper is published in a journal.

Mathematics Field of study concerning quantity, patterns and change

Mathematics includes the study of such topics as quantity, structure, space, and change. It has no generally accepted definition.

Contents

History

A screenshot of the arXiv taken in 1994, using the browser NCSA Mosaic. At the time, HTML forms were a new technology. ArXiv 1994.png
A screenshot of the arXiv taken in 1994, using the browser NCSA Mosaic. At the time, HTML forms were a new technology.

arXiv was made possible by the compact TeX file format, which allowed scientific papers to be easily transmitted over the Internet and rendered client-side. [9] Around 1990, Joanne Cohn began emailing physics preprints to colleagues as TeX files, but the number of papers being sent soon filled mailboxes to capacity. Paul Ginsparg recognized the need for central storage, and in August 1991 he created a central repository mailbox stored at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) which could be accessed from any computer. Additional modes of access were soon added: FTP in 1991, Gopher in 1992, and the World Wide Web in 1993. [6] [10] The term e-print was quickly adopted to describe the articles.

TeX, stylized within the system as TeX, is a typesetting system which was designed and mostly written by Donald Knuth and released in 1978. TeX is a popular means of typesetting complex mathematical formulae; it has been noted as one of the most sophisticated digital typographical systems.

Internet Global system of connected computer networks

The Internet is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies. The Internet carries a vast range of information resources and services, such as the inter-linked hypertext documents and applications of the World Wide Web (WWW), electronic mail, telephony, and file sharing.

Client-side refers to operations that are performed by the client in a client–server relationship in a computer network.

It began as a physics archive, called the LANL preprint archive, but soon expanded to include astronomy, mathematics, computer science, quantitative biology and, most recently, statistics. Its original domain name was xxx.lanl.gov. Due to LANL's lack of interest in the rapidly expanding technology, in 2001 Ginsparg changed institutions to Cornell University and changed the name of the repository to arXiv.org. [11] It is now hosted principally by Cornell, with eight mirrors around the world. [12]

Domain name identification string that defines a realm of administrative autonomy, authority or control within the Internet

A domain name is an identification string that defines a realm of administrative autonomy, authority or control within the Internet. Domain names are used in various networking contexts and for application-specific naming and addressing purposes. In general, a domain name identifies a network domain, or it represents an Internet Protocol (IP) resource, such as a personal computer used to access the Internet, a server computer hosting a web site, or the web site itself or any other service communicated via the Internet. In 2017, 330.6 million domain names had been registered.

Cornell University Private Ivy League research university in Upstate New York

Cornell University is a private and statutory Ivy League research university in Ithaca, New York. Founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White, the university was intended to teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge—from the classics to the sciences, and from the theoretical to the applied. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell's founding principle, a popular 1868 Ezra Cornell quotation: "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study."

Mirror websites or mirrors are replicas of other websites. Such websites have different URLs than the original site, but host identical or near-identical content. The main purpose of benign mirrors is often to reduce network traffic, improve access speed, improve availability of the original site, or provide a real-time backup of the original site. Malicious mirror sites can attempt to steal user information, distribute malware, or profit from the content of the original site, among other uses.

Its existence was one of the precipitating factors that led to the current movement in scientific publishing known as open access. Mathematicians and scientists regularly upload their papers to arXiv.org for worldwide access [13] and sometimes for reviews before they are published in peer-reviewed journals. Ginsparg was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2002 for his establishment of arXiv.

Mathematician person with an extensive knowledge of mathematics

A mathematician is someone who uses an extensive knowledge of mathematics in his or her work, typically to solve mathematical problems.

Peer review evaluation of work by one or more people of similar competence to the producers of the work

Peer review is the evaluation of work by one or more people with similar competences as the producers of the work (peers). It functions as a form of self-regulation by qualified members of a profession within the relevant field. Peer review methods are used to maintain quality standards, improve performance, and provide credibility. In academia, scholarly peer review is often used to determine an academic paper's suitability for publication. Peer review can be categorized by the type of activity and by the field or profession in which the activity occurs, e.g., medical peer review.

Academic journal peer-reviewed periodical relating to a particular academic discipline

An academic or scholarly journal is a periodical publication in which scholarship relating to a particular academic discipline is published. Academic journals serve as permanent and transparent forums for the presentation, scrutiny, and discussion of research. They are usually peer-reviewed or refereed. Content typically takes the form of articles presenting original research, review articles, and book reviews. The purpose of an academic journal, according to Henry Oldenburg, is to give researchers a venue to "impart their knowledge to one another, and contribute what they can to the Grand design of improving natural knowledge, and perfecting all Philosophical Arts, and Sciences."

The annual budget for arXiv is approximately $826,000 for 2013 to 2017, funded jointly by Cornell University Library, the Simons Foundation (in both gift and challenge grant forms) and annual fee income from member institutions. [14] This model arose in 2010, when Cornell sought to broaden the financial funding of the project by asking institutions to make annual voluntary contributions based on the amount of download usage by each institution. Each member institution pledges a five-year funding commitment to support arXiv. Based on institutional usage ranking, the annual fees are set in four tiers from $1,000 to $4,400. Cornell's goal is to raise at least $504,000 per year through membership fees generated by approximately 220 institutions. [15]

The Simons Foundation is a private foundation established in 1994 by Marilyn and James Harris Simons with offices in New York City. The foundation funds research in mathematics and the basic sciences.

In September 2011, Cornell University Library took overall administrative and financial responsibility for arXiv's operation and development. Ginsparg was quoted in the Chronicle of Higher Education as saying it "was supposed to be a three-hour tour, not a life sentence". [16] However, Ginsparg remains on the arXiv Scientific Advisory Board and on the arXiv Physics Advisory Committee .

Moderation process and endorsement

Although arXiv is not peer reviewed, a collection of moderators for each area review the submissions; they may recategorize any that are deemed off-topic, [17] or reject submissions that are not scientific papers, or sometimes for undisclosed reasons. [18] The lists of moderators for many sections of arXiv are publicly available, [19] but moderators for most of the physics sections remain unlisted.

Additionally, an "endorsement" system was introduced in 2004 as part of an effort to ensure content is relevant and of interest to current research in the specified disciplines. [20] Under the system, for categories that use it, an author must be endorsed by an established arXiv author before being allowed to submit papers to those categories. Endorsers are not asked to review the paper for errors, but to check whether the paper is appropriate for the intended subject area. [17] New authors from recognized academic institutions generally receive automatic endorsement, which in practice means that they do not need to deal with the endorsement system at all. However, the endorsement system has attracted criticism for allegedly restricting scientific inquiry. [21]

A majority of the e-prints are also submitted to journals for publication, but some work, including some very influential papers, remain purely as e-prints and are never published in a peer-reviewed journal. A well-known example of the latter is an outline of a proof of Thurston's geometrization conjecture, including the Poincaré conjecture as a particular case, uploaded by Grigori Perelman in November 2002. [22] Perelman appears content to forgo the traditional peer-reviewed journal process, stating: "If anybody is interested in my way of solving the problem, it's all there [on the arXiv] let them go and read about it". [23] Despite this non-traditional method of publication, other mathematicians recognized this work by offering the Fields Medal and Clay Mathematics Millennium Prizes to Perelman, both of which he refused. [24]

Submission formats

Papers can be submitted in any of several formats, including LaTeX, and PDF printed from a word processor other than TeX or LaTeX. The submission is rejected by the arXiv software if generating the final PDF file fails, if any image file is too large, or if the total size of the submission is too large. arXiv now allows one to store and modify an incomplete submission, and only finalize the submission when ready. The time stamp on the article is set when the submission is finalized.

Access

The standard access route is through the arXiv.org website or one of several mirrors. Several other interfaces and access routes have also been created by other un-associated organisations. These include the University of California, Davis's front, a web portal that offers additional search functions and a more self-explanatory interface for arXiv.org, and is referred to by some mathematicians as (the) Front. [25] A similar function used to be offered by eprintweb.org, launched in September 2006 by the Institute of Physics, and was switched off on June 30, 2014. Carnegie Mellon provides TablearXiv, [26] a search engine for tables extracted from arXiv publications. Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic can also be used to search for items in arXiv. [27] Finally, researchers can select sub-fields and receive daily e-mailings or RSS feeds of all submissions in them.

Files on arXiv can have a number of different copyright statuses: [28]

  1. Some are public domain, in which case they will have a statement saying so.
  2. Some are available under either the Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution-ShareAlike license or the Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike license.
  3. Some are copyright to the publisher, but the author has the right to distribute them and has given arXiv a non-exclusive irrevocable license to distribute them.
  4. Most are copyright to the author, and arXiv has only a non-exclusive irrevocable license to distribute them.

Controversy

While arXiv does contain some dubious e-prints, such as those claiming to refute famous theorems or proving famous conjectures such as Fermat's Last Theorem using only high-school mathematics, a 2002 source claims they are "surprisingly rare". [29] [ better source needed ] arXiv generally re-classifies these works, e.g. in "General mathematics", rather than deleting them; [30] however, some authors have voiced concern over the lack of transparency in the arXiv screening process. [31]

See also

Notes

  1. "Arxiv.org Traffic, Demographics and Competitors - Alexa". Alexa.com. Retrieved April 25, 2019.
  2. Steele, Bill (Fall 2012). "Library-managed 'arXiv' spreads scientific advances rapidly and worldwide". Ezra. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University. p. 9. OCLC   263846378. Archived from the original on January 11, 2015. Pronounce it 'archive'. The X represents the Greek letter chi [χ].
  3. Ginsparg, Paul (2011). "It was twenty years ago today ...". arXiv: 1108.2700 [cs.DL].
  4. "Online Scientific Repository Hits Milestone: With 500,000 Articles, arXiv Established as Vital Library Resource". News.library.cornell.edu. October 3, 2008. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  5. Vence, Tracy (December 29, 2014), "One Million Preprints and Counting: A conversation with arXiv founder Paul Ginsparg", The Scientist
  6. 1 2 3 Staff (January 13, 2015). "In the News: Open Access Journals". Drug Discovery & Development .
  7. "arXiv monthly submission rate statistics". Arxiv.org. Retrieved November 5, 2017.
  8. "Image" (GIF). Cs.cornell.edu. Retrieved March 9, 2019.
  9. O'Connell, Heath (2000). "Physicists Thriving with Paperless Publishing". arXiv: physics/0007040 .
  10. Paul Ginsparg "The global-village pioneers" Physics World October 1, 2008
  11. Butler, Declan (July 5, 2001). "Los Alamos Loses Physics Archive as Preprint Pioneer Heads East". Nature. 412 (6842): 3–4. doi:10.1038/35083708. PMID   11452262.
  12. "arXiv mirror sites". arXiv. Archived from the original on August 10, 2014. Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  13. Glanz, James (May 1, 2001). "The World of Science Becomes a Global Village; Archive Opens a New Realm of Research". The New York Times .
  14. "CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARY ARXIV FINANCIAL PROJECTIONS FOR 2013-2017" (PDF). Confluence.cornell.edu. March 28, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2017.
  15. "arXiv Member Institutions (2018) - arXiv public wiki - Dashboard". confluence.cornell.edu. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  16. Fischman, Joah (August 10, 2011). "The First Free Research-Sharing Site, arXiv, Turns 20 With an Uncertain Future". Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved August 12, 2011.
  17. 1 2 McKinney, Michelle (2011), "arXiv.org", Reference Reviews, 25 (7): 35–36, doi:10.1108/09504121111168622
  18. Merali, Zeeya. "ArXiv rejections lead to spat over screening process". Nature News. doi:10.1038/nature.2016.19267 . Retrieved March 9, 2019.
  19. Computing Research Repository Subject Areas and Moderators; Mathematics categories; Statistics archive; Quantitative Biology archive; Physics archive
  20. Ginsparg, Paul (2006), "As we may read", Journal of Neuroscience, 26 (38): 9606–9608, doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3161-06.2006, PMID   16988030
  21. Greechie, Richard; Pulmannova, Sylvia; Svozil, Karl (July 2005), "Preface to the Proceedings of Quantum Structures 2002", International Journal of Theoretical Physics, 44 (7): 691–692, Bibcode:2005IJTP...44..691G, doi:10.1007/s10773-005-7053-z, The new endorsement system may contribute to an effective barrier, a digital divide
  22. Perelman, Grisha (November 11, 2002). "The entropy formula for the Ricci flow and its geometric applications". arXiv: math.DG/0211159 .
  23. Nadejda Lobastova and Michael Hirst, "Maths genius living in poverty", Sydney Morning Herald, August 21, 2006
  24. Kaufman, Marc (July 2, 2010), "Russian mathematician wins $1 million prize, but he appears to be happy with $0", Washington Post
  25. "Front for the arXiv". Front.math.ucdavis.edu. September 10, 2007. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  26. "TablearXiv" . Retrieved September 15, 2015.
  27. Andy Stevens (andy.stevens@iop.org). "eprintweb". eprintweb. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  28. "arXiv License Information". Arxiv.org. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  29. Jackson, Allyn (2002). "From Preprints to E-prints: The Rise of Electronic Preprint Servers in Mathematics" (PDF). Notices of the American Mathematical Society. 49 (1): 23–32.
  30. "Front: (In)frequently asked questions". Front.math.ucdavis.edu. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  31. Merali, Zeeya (January 29, 2016). "ArXiv rejections lead to spat over screening process". Nature . Retrieved December 14, 2017.

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References