Aranama language

Last updated
Aranama
Tamique
Native to Texas
Ethnicity Aranama, Tamique
Extinct late 19th century
unclassified
Language codes
ISO 639-3 xrt
xrt
Glottolog aran1265 [1]

Aranama (Araname), also known as Tamique, is an extinct unclassified language of Texas. It was spoken by the Aranama and Tamique peoples at the Franciscan mission of Espíritu Santo de Zúñiga. It is only known from a two-word phrase from a non-native speaker. Variations on the name are Taranames, Jaranames ~ Xaranames ~ Charinames, Chaimamé, Hanáma ~ Hanáme. [2]

Extinct language language that no longer has any speakers, or that is no longer in current use

An extinct language is a language that no longer has any speakers, especially if the language has no living descendants. In contrast, a dead language is "one that is no longer the native language of any community", even if it is still in use, like Latin. Languages that currently have living native speakers are sometimes called modern languages to contrast them with dead languages, especially in educational contexts.

An unclassified language is a language whose genetic affiliation has not been established. Languages can be unclassified for a variety of reasons, mostly due to a lack of reliable data but sometimes due to the confounding influence of language contact, if different layers of its vocabulary or morphology point in different directions and it is not clear which represents the ancestral form of the language. Some poorly known extinct languages, such as Gutian and Cacán, are simply unclassifiable, and it is unlikely the situation will ever change.

Texas State of the United States of America

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas shares borders with the U.S. states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, while the Gulf of Mexico is to the southeast.

Related Research Articles

Wilson County, Texas County in the United States

Wilson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 42,918. Its county seat is Floresville. The county is named after James Charles Wilson.

Victoria County, Texas County in the United States

Victoria County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 86,793. Its county seat is Victoria.

Goliad, Texas City in Texas, United States

Goliad is a city in Goliad County, Texas, United States. It is known for the 1836 Goliad massacre during the Texas Revolution. It had a population of 1,908 at the 2010 census. Founded on the San Antonio River, it is the county seat of Goliad County. It is part of the Victoria, Texas, Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Espiritu Santo largest island in the nation of Vanuatu

Espiritu Santo is the largest island in the nation of Vanuatu, with an area of 3,955.5 km2 (1,527.2 sq mi) and a population of around 40,000 according to the 2009 census.

Matagorda Bay bay

Matagorda Bay is a large Gulf of Mexico estuary bay on the Texas coast, lying in Calhoun and Matagorda counties and located approximately 80 miles (130 km) northeast of Corpus Christi, 143 miles (230 km) east-southeast of San Antonio, 108 miles (174 km) south-southwest of Houston, and 167 miles (269 km) south-southeast of Austin. It is separated from the Gulf of Mexico by Matagorda Peninsula and serves as the mouth of numerous streams, most notably the Lavaca and Colorado Rivers. The Texas seaport of Port Lavaca is located on the system's northwestern extension of Lavaca Bay. The city of Palacios is found on northeastern extension of Tres Palacios Bay, and Port O'Connor is located on the southwestern tip of the main bay's shore. The ghost town of Indianola, which was a major port before it was destroyed by two hurricanes in the late 19th Century, is also found on the bay.

Spanish missions in Texas

The Spanish Missions in Texas comprise a series of religious outposts established by Spanish Catholic Dominicans, Jesuits, and Franciscans to spread the Catholic doctrine among area Native Americans, but with the added benefit of giving Spain a toehold in the frontier land. The missions introduced European livestock, fruits, vegetables, and industry into the Texas area. In addition to the presidio (fort) and pueblo (town), the misión was one of the three major agencies employed by the Spanish crown to extend its borders and consolidate its colonial territories. In all, twenty-six missions were maintained for different lengths of time within the future boundaries of the state of Texas.

Religious of the Virgin Mary

The Congregation of the Religious of the Virgin Mary is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical community of pontifical right founded in Manila in 1684 by the Filipina laywoman Venerable Mother Ignacia del Espíritu Santo.

San Antonio River river in the United States of America

The San Antonio River is a major waterway that originates in central Texas in a cluster of springs in midtown San Antonio, about 4 miles north of downtown, and follows a roughly southeastern path through the state. It eventually feeds into the Guadalupe River about 10 miles from San Antonio Bay on the Gulf of Mexico. The river is 240 miles long and crosses five counties: Bexar, Goliad, Karnes, Refugio, and Wilson.

Santo may refer to:

Baltasar de Zúñiga, 1st Duke of Arión Spanish viceroy of New Spain

Baltasar de Zúñiga y Guzmán, 1st Duke of Arión, 2nd Marquess of Valero was Spanish viceroy of New Spain from August 16, 1716 to October 14, 1722 and later president of the Council of the Indies.

The Forts of Texas include a number of historical and operational military installations. For over two hundred years, various groups fought over access to or control over the region that is now Texas. Possession of the region was claimed and disputed by the European powers of Spain and France, and the continental countries of Mexico, the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States of America. Ownership of specific lands were claimed and disputed by different ethnic groups, including numerous Native American tribes, Mexican residents, Anglo- and African-American settlers, and European immigrants. Access to and control of resources were claimed and disputed by various economic groups, including indigenous hunter/gatherers, farmers, herders, ranchers, colonists, settlers, buffalo hunters, traders, bandits, smugglers, pirates, and revolutionaries. Over the centuries, claims and disputes were enforced by Native American warriors, Spanish conquistadors, French cavaliers, Texas Rangers, local militias, and uniformed regular army regiments of Spain, Mexico, Texas, the United States, and the Confederacy.

Esparza (canton) Cantón in Puntarenas, Costa Rica

Esparza is the second canton in the province of Puntarenas in Costa Rica. The canton covers an area of 216.80 km², and has a population of 34,291. Its capital city is also called Esparza.

José de Azlor y Virto de Vera, the Marquis of San Miguel de Aguayo, was the governor of the Mexican provinces of Coahuila and Texas between 1719 and 1722. During his tenure, Aguayo retook eastern Texas from New France without firing a shot. He established or reestablished seven missions and three presidios, and quadrupled the number of Spanish soldiers stationed in Texas. Aguayo and his wife were also owners of a very large estate, or latifundio, in Coahuila. His descendants inherited and expanded the landholdings. The Aguayo dynasty continued until 1825.

Presidio La Bahía

The Presidio Nuestra Señora de Loreto de la Bahía, known more commonly as Presidio La Bahia, or simply La Bahia is a fort constructed by the Spanish Army that became the nucleus of the modern-day city of Goliad, Texas, United States. The current location dates to 1747.

The Congregation of the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena is a Dominican congregation of religious sisters under the patronage of St. Catherine of Siena. It was founded by Fr. Juan de Sto. Domingo, O.P., of Spain in 1696. Mother Francisca del Espiritu Santo Fuentes was appointed prioress for life.Servant of God Francisca del Espíritu Santo de Fuentes is a Spanish Roman Catholic religious figure. She was the first Prioress of the Congregation of the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena in the Philippines.

Simón de Arocha (1731–1796) was a Tejano militia commander and alcalde of San Antonio de Béxar. Like his father, who had been city clerk and public notary, Simón and his brothers became leaders in the province.

Espiritu Santo is the largest island in the nation of Vanuatu.

Mission Nuestra Señora del Espíritu Santo de Zúñiga

Mission Nuestra Señora del Espíritu Santo de Zúñiga, also known as Aranama Mission or Mission La Bahia, was a Roman Catholic mission established by Spain in 1722 in the Viceroyality of New Spain—to convert native Karankawa Indians to Christianity. Together with its nearby military fortress, Presidio La Bahia, the mission upheld Spanish territorial claims in the New World against encroachment from France. The third and final location near Goliad, Texas is maintained now as part of Goliad State Park and Historic Site.

Espiritu Joven is a Catholic youth movement in Cuba, focused on foreign Catholic medical students. Espiritu Joven has origined by a catholic monk, Sr. Cristina S.M and three medical students in ELAM, in Havana, Cuba, in 1999. Now, after 13 years, with seven branches and more than 300 participants, the movement is enrolling throughout Cuba.

Goliad State Park and Historic Site

Goliad State Park and Historic Site is a 188.3 acres (76 ha) state park located along the San Antonio River on the southern edge of Goliad, Texas. In addition to recreational facilities the park property includes three historic sites - the reconstructed Mission Nuestra Señora del Espíritu Santo de Zúñiga, the ruins of Mission Nuestra Señora del Rosario and the reconstructed birthplace of Ignacio Zaragoza. The park itself and Mission Nuestra Señora del Espíritu Santo de Zúñiga are included in the Goliad State Park Historic District listed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 12, 2001.

References

  1. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Aranama". Glottolog 3.0 . Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  2. Craig H. Roell, "NUESTRA SENORA DEL ESPIRITU SANTO DE ZUNIGA MISSION," Handbook of Texas Online , accessed July 12, 2012. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.