Arauco Province

Last updated
Arauco Province

Provincia de Arauco
Lebu.jpg
General view of Lebu
Logotipo de la Gobernacion de Arauco.svg
Seal
Txu-oclc-224571178-sj18-08.jpg
Location in the Region
Chile location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Arauco Province
Location in Chile
Coordinates: 37°46′S73°20′W / 37.767°S 73.333°W / -37.767; -73.333 Coordinates: 37°46′S73°20′W / 37.767°S 73.333°W / -37.767; -73.333
Country Chile
Region Bío Bío
Capital Lebu
Communes
Government
  Type Provincial
   Governor María Belgíca Tripailaf Quilodrán (UDI)
Area
[1]
  Total5,643.3 km2 (2,178.9 sq mi)
Population
 (2012 Census) [1]
  Total157,052
  Density28/km2 (72/sq mi)
  Urban
117,569
  Rural
39,686
Sex
[1]
  Men79,263
  Women77,992
Time zone UTC-4 (CLT [2] )
  Summer (DST) UTC-3 (CLST [3] )
Area code(s) 56 + 41
Website Governorate of Arauco

Arauco Province (Spanish : Provincia de Arauco) is one of four provinces of the Chilean region of Bío Bío (VIII). It spans a coastal area of 6,366 km2 (2,458 sq mi) just south of the mouth of the Biobío River, the traditional demarcation between the nation's major natural regions, Zona Central and Zona Sur. The province originally covered the once-independent indigenous territory of Araucanía, but this was afterward divided into four provinces. It is devoted largely to agricultural pursuits. The capital Lebu (population 25,000) is situated on the coast about 90 km (56 mi) south of Concepción with which it is connected by rail. [4]

Contents

Administration

As a province, Arauco is a second-level administrative division of Chile, governed by a provincial governor who is appointed by the president.

Communes

The province is composed of seven communes, each governed by a municipality consisting of an elected alcalde and municipal council.

Geography and demography

According to the 2002 census by the National Statistics Institute (INE), the province spans an area of 5,457.2 km2 (2,107 sq mi) [1] and had a population of 157,255 inhabitants (79,263 men and 77,992 women), giving it a population density of 28.8/km2 (75/sq mi). Of these, 117,569 (74.8%) lived in urban areas and 39,686 (25.2%) in rural areas. Between the 1992 and 2002 censuses, the population grew by 5% (7,554 persons). [1]

Related Research Articles

Parinacota Province Province in Arica y Parinacota, Chile

Parinacota Province is one of two provinces of the Chilean region of Arica y Parinacota. Its capital is Putre. It is named after the Parinacota Volcano.

Talca Province Province in Maule, Chile

Talca Province is one of four provinces of the central Chilean region of Maule (VII). Its capital is the city of Talca.

Llanquihue Province Province in Los Lagos, Chile

Llanquihue Province is one of four provinces of the Chilean region of Los Lagos (X). Its capital is Puerto Montt. Chile's second largest lake, Lake Llanquihue, is located in the province as well as four volcanoes: Osorno, Calbuco, Puntiagudo and Cerro Tronador.

Valdivia Province Province in Los Ríos, Chile

Valdivia Province is one of two provinces of the southern Chilean region of Los Ríos (XIV). The provincial capital is Valdivia. Located in the province are two important rivers, the Calle-Calle / Valdivia River and the Cruces River.It is part of Northern Patagonia and its wild virgin forest embrace the Patagonian Cordillera following the river Calle Calle down to the Pacific Ocean. It is known in Patagonia the term "Bosque Valdiviano" referring to the primitive forest of Valdivia with its native trees. These forests are present in some parts of Northern Patagonia, both in Chile and Argentina.

Cautín Province Province in La Araucanía, Chile

Cautín Province is one of two provinces in the southern Chilean region of La Araucanía (IX), bounded on the north by Arauco and Malleco provinces, on the east by Argentina, on the south by Valdivia Province, and on the west by the Pacific Ocean. Its population at the 2012 census was of 692,582. The most important communes are Temuco, Villarrica, Padre Las Casas, and Nueva Imperial. Cattle, forestry, and agriculture make up most of Cautin's economy. Its climate is humid, rainy in winter, and generally warm in summer.

Biobío Province Province in Bío Bío, Chile

Biobío Province is one of four provinces of the Chilean region of Biobío (VIII). Its capital is Los Ángeles. It is bounded on the north, west and south by the provinces of Concepción, Arauco and Malleco, respectively, and on the east by Argentina. It has an area of 14,987.9 km2 (5,787 sq mi) of well-wooded and mountainous country, and exports timber to a large extent. The population is 373,981 according to the census of 2012.

Chiloé Province Province in Los Lagos, Chile

Chiloé Province is one of the four provinces in the southern Chilean region of Los Lagos (X). It consists of all of Chiloé Archipelago with the exception of the Desertores Islands. The province spans a surface area of 9,181.6 km2 (3,545 sq mi). Its capital is Castro, and the seat of the Roman Catholic bishopric is Ancud.

Linares Province Province in Maule, Chile

Linares is one of four provinces of the central Chilean region of Maule (VII). The provincial capital and most populous center is the city of Linares.

Cauquenes Province Province in Maule, Chile

Cauquenes Province is one of four provinces of the central Chilean region of Maule (VII). The provincial capital is the city of Cauquenes.

El Ranco Province Province in Los Ríos, Chile

El Ranco Province is one of two provinces of the southern Chilean region of Los Ríos (XIV). It is named after Ranco Lake shared by the communes (comunas) of Futrono and Lago Ranco. The lake is drained by the Bueno River, on which basin lies most of the province. La Unión is the provincial capital.

Cachapoal Province Province in Libertador General Bernardo OHiggins Region, Chile

Cachapoal Province is one of three provinces of the central Chilean region of O'Higgins (VI). Its capital is the city of Rancagua.

Capitán Prat Province Province in Aisén, Chile

Capitán Prat Province is one of four provinces in the southern Chilean region of Aisén (XI). Its capital is Cochrane. The province is named after the naval hero Arturo Prat.

El Loa Province in Antofagasta, Chile

El Loa Province is one of three provinces of the northern Chilean region of Antofagasta (II). It is named after the longest of rivers in Chile, the Loa River. The provincial capital is Calama.

Concepción Province, Chile Province in Bío Bío, Chile

Concepción Province is one of four provinces of the Chilean region of Bío Bío (VIII). Its capital, Concepción, is part of the Greater Concepción conurbation, the nation's second largest metropolitan area after Santiago.

Cardenal Caro Province Province in OHiggins, Chile

Cardenal Caro Province is one of the three provinces of the central Chilean region of O'Higgins (VI). The capital of Cardenal Caro is Pichilemu.

General Carrera Province Province in Aisén, Chile

General Carrera Province is one of four provinces of the southern Chilean region of Aisen (XI). Its capital city is Chile Chico.

Coyhaique Province Province in Aisén, Chile

Coyhaique Province is one of four provinces of the southern Chilean region of Aisen (XI). Its capital city is Coyhaique. It is the most populous of provinces in the Aysén Region.

Arauco, Chile City and Commune in Bío Bío, Chile

Arauco is a city and commune in Chile, located in Arauco Province in the Bío Bío Region. The meaning of Arauco means Chalky Water in Mapudungun. The region was a Moluche aillarehue. The Spanish settlements founded here during the Conquest of Chile were destroyed on numerous occasions by the Mapuche during the Arauco War.

Tirúa Town and Commune in Biobío, Chile

Tirúa is a Chilean commune and town in Arauco Province, Biobío Region. The 2010 Chile earquake led to a permanent uplift of Tirúa of about 180 cm above sea level, the highest recorded uplift related to the earthquake. This caused a large islet to form at the mouth of Tirúa River next to the town. The Misión Jesuita Mapuche is based in Tirúa.

Contulmo Town and Commune in Biobío Region, Chile

Contulmo is a Chilean town and commune in Arauco Province, Biobío Region. Colonized by Germans of Berlin since 1884.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Territorial division of Chile" (PDF) (in Spanish). National Statistics Institute. 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 November 2010. Retrieved 18 March 2011.
  2. "Chile Time". WorldTimeZones.org. Archived from the original on 13 July 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-28.
  3. "Chile Summer Time". WorldTimeZones.org. Archived from the original on 2007-09-11. Retrieved 2010-07-28.
  4. Wikisource-logo.svg One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Arauco". Encyclopædia Britannica . 2 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 322.