Archdeacon of Bedford

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Wax seal (created post-2003) from 12/13th c. brass matrix of the Archdeacon of Bedford, found in South Lincolnshire in 2003 by a metal detectorist. Latin inscription: SIGILLUM ARCHIDIACONI BEDEFORDI(A)E ("Seal of the Archdeacon of Bedford"). The arms at dexter are Cantilupe (modern): Gules, three leopard's faces jessant-de-lys or, as used by Saint Thomas de Cantilupe (d.1282), Bishop of Hereford, and later adopted as the arms of the See of Hereford WaxSeal ArchdeaconOfBedford 13-14c CantilupeArms.jpg
Wax seal (created post-2003) from 12/13th c. brass matrix of the Archdeacon of Bedford, found in South Lincolnshire in 2003 by a metal detectorist. Latin inscription: SIGILLUM ARCHIDIACONI BEDEFORDI(A)E ("Seal of the Archdeacon of Bedford"). The arms at dexter are Cantilupe (modern): Gules, three leopard's faces jessant-de-lys or, as used by Saint Thomas de Cantilupe (d.1282), Bishop of Hereford, and later adopted as the arms of the See of Hereford

The Archdeacon of Bedford is an ecclesiastical post in the Church of England Diocese of St Albans in the Province of Canterbury. Historically the post was in the Diocese of Lincoln, then from 1837 in the Diocese of Ely, England. On 13 April 1914, the archdeaconry became a part of the diocese of St Albans. [1] The present holder of the office is Dave Middlebrook, collated Archdeacon on 30 March 2019.

Contents

Seal

The 12/13th c. brass seal-matrix of the Archdeacon of Bedford was found in South Lincolnshire in 2003 by a metal detectorist, in almost perfect condition. It displays a legend in Latin: SIGILLUM ARCHIDIACONI BEDEFORDI(A)E ("Seal of the Archdeacon of Bedford"). Of two heraldic shields, that shown at dexter displays the arms of Cantilupe (modern): Gules, three leopard's faces jessant-de-lys or, as used by Saint Thomas de Cantilupe (d.1282), Bishop of Hereford, and later adopted as the arms of the See of Hereford. The reason for the use of the Cantilupe arms on the seal is unclear, the surviving (but incomplete) list of Archdeacons of Bedford does not include a member of the Cantilupe family. [2] The office of Archdeacon of Bedford had no connection with the See of Hereford and is known to have been under the control of the See of Lincoln, hence a possible reason for the location the object was found in. The Cantilupe family were feudal barons of Eaton (Bray) in Bedfordshire and were seated (amongst many other places) at Eaton Castle, near Dunstable, not too far from the town of Bedford. A junior branch (see Baron Cantilupe) was seated at Greasley Castle in Nottingham and at Withcall in Lincolnshire, in which county they were prominent. Nicholas de Cantilupe, 3rd Baron Cantilupe (c.1301-1355) of Greasley founded the Cantilupe Chantry in Lincoln Cathedral and was buried in the Cathedral where survives his mutilated recumbent effigy. However the armorials of the Greasley branch include a fess vair, not shown on the seal. [3] The style of the seal with the gothic architectural elements date it to the 13/14th. centuries. Measurements: 32 mm x 51 mm; weight 2.5 g. [4]

List of archdeacons

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Feudal barony of Eaton Bray

The feudal barony of Eaton Bray in Bedfordshire was an English feudal barony founded in 1205 when the manor of Eaton was granted by King John to his household steward William I de Cantilupe (d.1239), together with many others, including Aston in Warwickshire. In 1221 Cantilupe built a castle at Eaton, which became the caput of his feudal barony and was described by the monks of nearby Dunstable Priory in the Annals of Dunstable as being "a serious danger to Dunstable and the neighbourhood". The grant was for knight-service of one knight and was in exchange for the manor of Great Coxwell, Berkshire, which had been granted to him previously but the grant was deemed compromised. Eaton had been held at the time of William the Conqueror by the latter's uterine half-brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, but later escheated to the crown.

References

  1. "No. 28819". The London Gazette . 7 April 1914. pp. 2987–2991.
  2. https://finds.org.uk/database/artefacts/record/id/106913
  3. For a discussion on the seal of the Archdeacon of Bedford and its possible relation to the Cantilupe family see: M Julian-Jones, Thesis on de Cantilupe and Corbet families, 2015, Online Research @Cardiff (ORCA), Cardiff University
  4. https://finds.org.uk/database/artefacts/record/id/106913
  5. Plea Rolls of the Court of Common Pleas; National Archives; CP 40/629; http://aalt.law.uh.edu/H5/CP40no629/aCP40no629fronts/IMG_0825.htm; fifth entry, end of line 3, as plaintiff
  6. "No. 19499". The London Gazette . 30 May 1837. pp. 1369–1371.
  7. "Appointments" . Church Times (#8164). 6 September 2019. p. 27. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  8. "Sunday notice sheet: Sunday 2nd December 2018". St Luke's Church, Watford. Archived from the original on 3 December 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019.

Sources