Archdeacon of Bristol

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The Archdeacon of Bristol is a senior ecclesiastical officer within the Diocese of Bristol. The archdeaconry was created – within the Diocese of Gloucester and Bristol – by Order in Council on 7 October 1836 [1] and became part of the re-erected Diocese of Bristol on 8 February 1898. [2]

As archdeacon she or he is responsible for the disciplinary supervision of the clergy [3] within three area deaneries: Bristol City, Bristol South and Bristol West.

List of archdeacons

In 1898, the archdeaconry was transferred from Gloucester & Bristol diocese to the new Diocese of Bristol.

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References

  1. "No. 19426". The London Gazette . 7 October 1836. pp. 1734–1738.
  2. "No. 26936". The London Gazette . 8 February 1898. pp. 756–758.
  3. "ABCD: a basic church dictionary" Meakin, T: Norwich, Canterbury Press, 2001 ISBN   978-1-85311-420-5
  4. "The Venerable Thomas Thorp (1797–1878), Fellow, Tutor, Vice-Master and Archdeacon of Bristol (1836–1873)". Art UK . Retrieved 7 July 2012.
  5. 1 2 "Gloucestershire Archives: Online Catalogue". Gloucestershire County Councill. Retrieved 7 July 2012.
  6. "Rev.Canon John Pilkington Norris 1823 - 1891" . Retrieved 7 July 2012.
  7. "London Gazette" (PDF). Retrieved 7 July 2012.
  8. "St Mary's News". Shire. Archived from the original on 9 September 2017. Retrieved 9 September 2017.
  9. "Appointments" . Church Times . No. 7814. 21 December 2012. p. 58. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 7 June 2014.
  10. Diocese of Bristol – Appointment of Assistant Archdeacon Archived 2014-03-13 at archive.today (Accessed 13 March 2014)
  11. Diocese of Bristol – Changes at Diocesan Office Archived 2015-06-24 at the Wayback Machine (Accessed 24 June 2015)
  12. "Appointments" . Church Times . No. 8105. 20 July 2018. p. 25. ISSN   0009-658X . Retrieved 6 August 2018.
  13. "Bristol - News - Revd Canon Michael Johnson appointed Acting Dean at Bristol Cathedral". www.bristol.anglican.org. Archived from the original on 1 October 2019.
  14. "Diocese of Bristol — Johnson appointed Acting Archdeacon of Bristol" . Retrieved 1 May 2018.
  15. "Application Pack — Acting Archdeacon of Bristol" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 May 2018. Retrieved 1 May 2018.
  16. "Revd Neil Warwick appointed Archdeacon of Bristol". Diocese of Bristol. 14 April 2019. Archived from the original on 3 May 2019.
  17. "New Bishop of Swindon consecrated at Canterbury Cathedral". Diocese of Bristol. 30 November 2023. Archived from the original on 1 December 2023. Retrieved 20 December 2023.