Archduke Rudolf of Austria (1919–2010)

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Archduke Rudolf
Born(1919-09-05)5 September 1919
Prangins, Switzerland
Died15 May 2010(2010-05-15) (aged 90)
Brussels, Kingdom of Belgium
Spouse
Princess Anna Gabriele of Wrede
(m. 1971)
IssueArchduchess Maria Anna, Princess Galitzine
Archduke Karl Peter
Archduke Simeon
Archduke Johannes Karl
Archduchess Catharina-Maria
Full name
Rudolf Syringus Peter Karl Franz Joseph Robert Otto Antonius Maria Pius Benedikt Ignatius Laurentius Justiniani Marcus d'Aviano
House Habsburg-Lorraine
Father Charles I of Austria
Mother Princess Zita of Bourbon-Parma

Archduke Rudolf of Austria (5 September 1919 – 15 May 2010 [1] ) was the sixth child and youngest son of Emperor Charles I of Austria and Zita of Bourbon-Parma.

Charles I of Austria Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary as Charles IV

Charles I or Karl I was the last Emperor of Austria, the last King of Hungary, the last King of Bohemia, and the last monarch belonging to the House of Habsburg-Lorraine before the dissolution of Austria-Hungary. After his uncle Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated in 1914, Charles became heir presumptive of Emperor Franz Joseph. Charles I reigned from 21 November 1916 until 11–12 November 1918, when he "renounced participation" in state affairs, but did not abdicate. He spent the remaining years of his life attempting to restore the monarchy until his death in 1922. Beatified by Pope John Paul II in 2004, he is known to the Catholic Church as Blessed Karl of Austria.

Zita of Bourbon-Parma empress consort of Austria and queen consort of Hungary

Zita of Bourbon-Parma was the wife of Charles, the last monarch of Austria-Hungary. As such, she was the last Empress of Austria and Queen of Hungary, in addition to other titles.

Contents

Early life

He was born in Prangins, Switzerland, where the Austrian Imperial family were staying after they had been sent into exile. He was named after Count Rudolph IV of Habsburg. [2]

Prangins Place in Vaud, Switzerland

Prangins is a municipality in the district of Nyon in the canton of Vaud in Switzerland. It is located on Lake Geneva.

Switzerland Federal republic in Central Europe

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a sovereign state situated in the confluence of western, central, and southern Europe. It is a federal republic composed of 26 cantons, with federal authorities seated in Bern. Switzerland is a landlocked country bordered by Italy to the south, France to the west, Germany to the north, and Austria and Liechtenstein to the east. It is geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi), and land area of 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi). While the Alps occupy the greater part of the territory, the Swiss population of approximately 8.5 million is concentrated mostly on the plateau, where the largest cities are located, among them the two global cities and economic centres of Zürich and Geneva.

Educated with his siblings first in Spain then in Belgium, in 1944 he and his brother Archduke Carl Ludwig of Austria secretly entered Austria to join the Austrian resistance, but Rudolf was expelled in 1946 once his membership in the formerly imperial House of Habsburg was exposed. [3] After the war he travelled to the United States, Canada and the Belgian Congo. [3]

Archduke Carl Ludwig of Austria (1918–2007) austrian entrepreneur and nobleman

Archduke Carl Ludwig of Austria, also known as Carl Ludwig Habsburg-Lothringen, was the fifth child of Charles I of Austria and Princess Zita of Bourbon-Parma. He was born in Baden bei Wien and died in Brussels.

House of Habsburg Austrian dynastic family

The House of Habsburg and alternatively called the House of Austria, was one of the most influential and distinguished royal houses of Europe. The throne of the Holy Roman Empire was continuously occupied by the Habsburgs from 1438 until their extinction in the male line in 1740. The house also produced emperors and kings of Bohemia, Hungary, Croatia, Galicia, Portugal and Spain with their respective colonies, as well as rulers of several principalities in the Netherlands and Italy. From the 16th century, following the reign of Charles V, the dynasty was split between its Austrian and Spanish branches. Although they ruled distinct territories, they nevertheless maintained close relations and frequently intermarried.

Rudolf worked as a Wall Street junior executive [4] and a bank director. [3] [5]

Wall Street Street in Manhattan, New York

Wall Street is an eight-block-long street running roughly northwest to southeast from Broadway to South Street, at the East River, in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City. Over time, the term has become a metonym for the financial markets of the United States as a whole, the American financial services industry, or New York–based financial interests.

Marriage and issue

Archduke Rudolf was married by Archbishop Fulton Sheen to Countess Xenia Czernichev-Besobrasov the daughter of Count Sergei Aleksandrovich Chernyshev-Besobrasov and Countess Elizabeta Dmitrievna Cheremeteva, on 22 June 1953 at Tuxedo Park, New York. [5] They had four children. Xenia was killed in a car crash on 20 September 1968, in which Rudolf was also seriously injured. [6]

Countess Xenia Czernichev-Besobrasov was the first wife of Archduke Rudolf of Austria, the youngest son of the last reigning Emperor of Austria-Hungary, Charles I.

Tuxedo Park, New York Village in New York, United States

Tuxedo Park is a village in Orange County, New York, United States. The population was 623 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Poughkeepsie–Newburgh–Middletown metropolitan area as well as the larger New York metropolitan area. The name is derived from a Native American word of the Lenape language, tucsedo or p'tuxseepu, which is said to mean "crooked water" or "crooked river."

Archduke Simeon of Austria Archduke of Austria

Archduke Simeon of Austria is a member of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine. He is the third-eldest child of Archduke Rudolf of Austria and his first wife, Countess Xenia Czernichev-Besobrasov. Simeon is a paternal grandson of Charles I of Austria and Zita of Bourbon-Parma.

Rudolf was married secondly to Princess Anna Gabriele von Wrede (11 September 1940) on 15 October 1971 in Ellingen, Bavaria. [3] They have one daughter. [3]

Rudolph was survived by two older brothers; Otto and Felix.

Ancestry

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References

  1. Brook-Shepherd, Gordon (2003). Uncrowned Emperor. Hambledon Continuum. p. 54. ISBN   1-85285-439-1.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 de Badts de Cugnac, Chantal. Coutant de Saisseval, Guy. Le Petit Gotha’’. Nouvelle Imprimerie Laballery, Paris 2002, p. 172-174, 196-198 (French) ISBN   2-9507974-3-1
  3. "Milestones". Time Magazine. 1953-07-06. Archived from the original on 7 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-01.
  4. 1 2 3 Genealogisches Handbuch des Adels, Fürstliche Häuser XV. "Haus Österreich". C.A. Starke Verlag, 2001, pp. 87, 97. (German) ISBN   3-7980-0814-0.
  5. "Archduchess Xenia of Habsburg killed". New York Times. 1968-09-27.
  6. https://www.zola.com/registry/mariaandrishi