Archippus

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Archippus
Archippus and Philemon (Menologion of Basil II).jpg
Martyr
Bornpossibly at Colossae or Laodicea
Diedc. 1st century
Feast 20 March ( Roman Catholic Church )
19 February ( Eastern Orthodox Churches )

Archippus ( /ɑːrˈkɪpəs/ ; Ancient Greek: Ἅρχιππος, "master of the horse") was an early Christian believer mentioned briefly in the New Testament epistles of Philemon and Colossians.

Contents

Role in the New Testament

In Paul's letter to Philemon (Philemon 1:2), Archippus is named once alongside Philemon and Apphia as a host of the church, and a "fellow soldier." In Colossians 4:17 (ascribed to Paul), the church is instructed to tell Archippus to "Take heed to the ministry which thou hast received in the Lord, that thou fulfil it."

Role in tradition

According to the 4th century Apostolic Constitutions (7.46), Archippus was the first bishop of Laodicea in Phrygia (now part of Turkey). Another tradition states that he was one of the 72 disciples appointed by Jesus Christ in Luke 10:1. What this is based on is pure conjecture. The Roman Catholic Church observes a feast day for Saint Archippus on March 20. The Eastern Orthodox Church observes a feast day on February 19 as well as November 22 along with Saints Philemon, Apphia, and Onesimus. According to tradition, he was stoned to death.

See also

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