Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism

Last updated
Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism
Agency overview
Formed 1945 (1945) (as the Arkansas Resources and Development Commission)
Preceding agencies
  • Arkansas Resources and Development Commission,
  • State Forestry and Parks Commission
Jurisdiction Arkansas General Assembly
Headquarters 1 Capitol Mall,
Little Rock, Arkansas 72201
Employees 1603
Annual budget $126,591,486 (2012)
Agency executive
  • Kane Webb, Executive director
Child agency
  • Arkansas State Parks
Website http://www.arkansas.com/

The Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism (ADPT) is a department of the U.S. state of Arkansas charged with promoting, protecting, interpreting, and managing the state's natural and cultural resources. [1] The department is also tasked with increasing tourism and promoting individuals, families, and businesses to relocate to Arkansas.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Contents

The department is in charge of maintaining all state parks and welcome centers.

See also

Related Research Articles

Arkansas County, Arkansas County in the United States

Arkansas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,019. Located in the Arkansas Delta, the county has two county seats, De Witt and Stuttgart.

Mount Magazine mountain

Mount Magazine, officially named Magazine Mountain, is the highest point of the U.S. Interior Highlands and the U.S. state of Arkansas, and is the site of Mount Magazine State Park. It is a flat-topped mountain or mesa capped by hard rock and rimmed by precipitous cliffs. There are two summits atop the mountain: Signal Hill, which reaches 2,753 feet (839 m), and Mossback Ridge, which reaches 2,700 ft (823.0 m).

Crater of Diamonds State Park

Crater of Diamonds State Park is a 911-acre (369 ha) Arkansas state park in Pike County, Arkansas, in the United States. The park features a 37.5-acre plowed field, the world's only diamond-bearing site accessible to the public. Diamonds have continuously been discovered in the field since 1906, including the Strawn-Wagner Diamond. The site became a state park in 1972 after the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism purchased the site from the Arkansas Diamond Company and Ozark Diamond Mines Corporation, who had operated the site as a tourist attraction previously.

Bull Shoals-White River State Park

Bull Shoals-White River State Park is a 732-acre (296 ha) Arkansas state park in Baxter and Marion Counties, Arkansas in the United States. Containing one of the nation's best trout-fishing streams, the park entered the system in 1955 after the United States Army Corps of Engineers built Bull Shoals Dam on the White River. The park runs along the shoreline of Bull Shoals Lake and the White River above and below the dam, and contains picnic areas, a marina, boat rentals, interpretive programs, and a visitors' center with gift shop.

Cane Creek State Park

Cane Creek State Park is a 2,053-acre (831 ha) Arkansas state park in Lincoln County, Arkansas in the United States. Straddling the Gulf Coastal Plain and the Mississippi Delta, the park includes the 1,675-acre (678 ha) Cane Creek Lake, a wooded lake which borders Bayou Bartholomew, the world's longest bayou. The park became a reality when the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Soil Conservation Service said it would provide federal funds to the project in 1973, prompting the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC) to pledge to build and maintain the lake within the park. The park is characterized by rolling wooded hills, deep draws, and steeply sloping ridges.

Conway Cemetery State Park

Conway Cemetery State Park is a 11.5-acre (4.7 ha) Arkansas state park in Lafayette County, Arkansas in the United States. Located on the former cotton plantation grounds of James Sevier Conway, the cemetery serves as Conway's final resting place. No recreational or visitors' amenities are available at the historic site. The site became a state park in 1986 as part of Arkansas's sesquicentennial.

Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area

Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area is a 5,299.65-acre (2,144.69 ha) Arkansas state park in Howard County and Polk County, Arkansas in the United States. The park follows a rough, undeveloped 12.5 miles (20.1 km) of the Cossatot River. The river itself is included in Arkansas's Natural and Scenic Rivers System and the National Park Service's list of National Wild and Scenic Rivers, making it a whitewater rafting destination. The rough nature of the river, including Class III, IV, and dangerous Class V rapids, make the park-natural area a popular destination for skilled canoeists, kayakers, and playboaters. The park became a part of the system in 1988 after the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism and Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission agreed to cooperative management after acquiring the property from the Weyerhaeuser Corporation.

Geography of Arkansas

The geography of Arkansas varies widely. The state is covered by mountains, river valleys, forests, lakes, and bayous in addition to the cities of Arkansas. Hot Springs National Park features bubbling springs of hot water, formerly sought across the country for their healing properties. Crowley's Ridge is a geological anomaly rising above the surrounding lowlands of the Mississippi embayment.

Devils Den State Park Arkansas state park in Washington County, near West Fork, Arkansas in the United States

Devil's Den State Park is a 2,500-acre (1,000 ha) Arkansas state park in Washington County, near West Fork, Arkansas in the United States. The park was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps, beginning in 1933. Devil's Den State Park is in the Lee Creek Valley in the Boston Mountains, which are the southwestern part of The Ozarks. The park, with an 8 acres (3.2 ha) CCC-built lake, is open for year-round recreation, with trails for hiking, mountain biking and horseback riding. Devil's Den State Park also has several picnic areas, a swimming pool and cabins, with camping sites ranging from modern to primitive. Fossils of coral and crinoids can be found along the banks and within Lee Creek at Devil's Den State Park.

Jacksonport State Park

Jacksonport State Park is a 164.7-acre (66.7 ha) Arkansas state park in Jackson County, Arkansas in the United States. The park contains the 1872 Jacksonport courthouse which served as the home of county government from 1872-1892. Furnished with regional items of historical significance, tours of the courthouse are available. Jacksonport served as an important steamboat stop and trading center at the confluence of the White River and Black River, until being bypassed by the Iron Mountain and Southern Railroad shortly after becoming county seat.

Lake Poinsett State Park

Lake Poinsett State Park is a 132-acre (53 ha) Arkansas state park on Crowley's Ridge in Poinsett County, Arkansas in the United States. The park was formed after the damming of Distress Creek to create a recreational lake in the county in 1960. The park is located along the western bank of the lake and is open for year-round for camping/picnicking. Boat rentals are available from February to November.

Mount Magazine State Park state park in Arkansas

Mount Magazine State Park is a 2,234-acre park located in Logan County, Arkansas. Inhabited since the 1850s, Mount Magazine first became part of the Ouachita National Forest in 1938, was re-designated as part of the Ozark National Forest in 1941, and became a state park after a 22-year conversion process from the U.S. Forest Service to the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism. Mount Magazine State Park is the highest park in Arkansas. The park contains Mossback Ridge, including the peak of Mount Magazine which contains The Lodge at Mount Magazine, cabins, trails, and a hang gliding area.

Lake Fort Smith State Park

Lake Fort Smith State Park is a 260-acre (110 ha) Arkansas state park in Crawford County, Arkansas in the United States. Originally a Fort Smith city park in the 1930s and later the Works Progress Administration-built Mountainburg Recreational Facility, the lake nestled in the Boston Mountains was adopted into the state park system by the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism in 1967. Lake Fort Smith State Park was closed in 2002 to make way for a larger dam and spillway. The addition flooded the site of the old park, and the new 260 acre Lake Fort Smith State Park reopened May 21, 2008 four miles north of its original location with 30 camp sites, 10 cabins, a group lodging facility, picnic sites, a pavilion, marina with rental boats, a double lane boat ramp, a swimming pool, playground, and an 8,000 square foot visitor center with exhibit gallery, gift shop, a meeting/class room, a patio with an outdoor wood burning fireplace, and an expansive view of the lake and mountains.

Delta Heritage Trail State Park

Delta Heritage Trail State Park is a 960-acre (390 ha) Arkansas state park in Arkansas, Desha, and Phillips counties, Arkansas in the United States. A rails to trails conversion planned along 73 miles (117 km) of abandoned Union Pacific right of way, the Delta Heritage Trail currently runs 14 miles (23 km) from Lexa to Barton. Acquisition of the abandoned corridor was aided by the National Trails System Act, and the beginnings of the trail through Delta lowlands was dedicated in 2002.

Arkansas Heritage Trails System highway system

Arkansas Heritage Trails System is a network of four historic trails within the state of Arkansas. The heritage trails system was established by the Arkansas General Assembly on March 31, 2009. Roadways included in the system are Arkansas Department of Transportation (ArDOT) as well as county roads. The program emphasizes cooperation among the Arkansas Department of Heritage, the Department of Parks and Tourism, and the Department of Transportation.

Lake Charles State Park

Lake Charles State Park is a 140-acre (57 ha) Arkansas state park in Lawrence County, Arkansas in the United States. Situated in The Ozarks along the Black River, the park features the 645-acre (261 ha) artificial Lake Charles. The lake is a result of a partnership of four agencies to construct a multipurpose lake just north of Shirey Bay Rainey Brake Wildlife Management Area in an effort to control flooding and preserve the watershed. Construction on the lake began in 1964, and the park was dedicated in 1967.

Village Creek State Park (Arkansas)

Village Creek State Park is a 6,909-acre (2,796 ha) Arkansas state park in Cross and St. Francis counties, Arkansas in the United States. The park was formed as a result of a study commissioned by the Arkansas General Assembly to form a large park in east Arkansas. Segments of the Old Military Road, later used as the Trail of Tears run through the park, which also features two lakes and 27 holes of golf.

Queen Wilhelmina State Park

Queen Wilhelmina State Park is a unit of Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism in the Ouachita Mountains.

Lake Frierson State Park

Lake Frierson State Park is a 114-acre (46 ha) Arkansas state park on Crowley's Ridge in Greene County, eastern Arkansas.

References

  1. Staff. "Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism Overview". Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism. Archived from the original (PPT) on January 5, 2009. Retrieved January 17, 2012.