Army of the Three Guarantees

Last updated
Ejército Trigrante
Participant in Mexican War of Independence Spanish American Wars of Independence
Flag of the Three Guarantees.svg
ActiveFebruary 24, 1821
Ideology Nationalism
Group(s)
  • Mexican royalist troops
  • Mexican insurgent troops
Leaders
Army Commander Agustín de Iturbide
Guerrilla Commander Vicente Guerrero
Opponent(s) Flag of Spain (1785-1873, 1875-1931).svg Spain; Royalists

At the end of the Mexican War of Independence, the Army of the Three Guarantees (Spanish : Ejército Trigarante or Ejército de las Tres Garantías) was the name given to the army after the unification of the Spanish troops led by Agustín de Iturbide and the Mexican insurgent troops of Vicente Guerrero, consolidating Mexico's independence from Spain. The decree creating this army appeared in the Plan de Iguala, which stated the three guarantees which it was meant to defend: religion, independence, and unity. Mexico was to be a Catholic empire, independent from Spain, and united against its enemies.

Contents

History

The Army of the Three Guarantees was created on February 24, 1821, and continued battling Spanish royalist forces which refused to accept Mexican independence. These battles continued until August 1821, when Iturbide and Spanish Viceroy Juan de O'Donojú signed the Treaty of Córdoba, virtually ratifying Mexico's independence. The Army was a decisive force during the Battle of Azcapotzalco. The victory in this last battle of the war cleared the way to Mexico City. On September 27, 1821, the Army of the Three Guarantees triumphantly entered Mexico City, led by Iturbide. The following day Mexico was declared independent.

By that time, the Army of the Three Guarantees was composed of 7,616 infantrymen, 7,755 cavalry, 763 artillery with 68 cannons.

Generals

Generals of the Army of the Three Guarantees (left to right), a painting by Ferdinand Bastin.
- Toribio Cortina
- Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna
- Melchor Muzquiz
- Guadalupe Victoria
- Leonardo Bravo
- Jose Antonio de Echavarri
- Miguel Barragan
- Vicente Valencia
- Ignacio Allende
- Jose Moran y del Villar
- Laureano Jose Teran
- Vicente Filisola
- Mariano Paredes y Arrillaga
- Pedro Celestino Negrete
- Agustin de Iturbide
- Anastasio Bustamante
- Vicente Guerrero
- Valentin Canalizo
- Juan Aldama y Gonzalez
- Juan Jose Minon
- Nicolas Bravo
- Fray Luis de Herrera
- Manuel Rincon
- Luis Cortazar Rabago Ejercito Trigarante.jpg
Generals of the Army of the Three Guarantees (left to right), a painting by Ferdinand Bastin.

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References