Arnie Weinmeister

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Arnie Weinmeister
B.C. Lions, number 63 VPL 84780C (15714933159).jpg
Weinmeister in 1954
No. 73
Position: Defensive tackle
Personal information
Born:(1923-03-23)March 23, 1923
Rhein, Saskatchewan, Canada
Died:June 28, 2000(2000-06-28) (aged 77)
Seattle, Washington, U.S.
Career information
High school: Portland (OR) Jefferson
College: Washington
NFL Draft: 1945  / Round: 17 / Pick: 166
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:71
Fumble recoveries:8
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Arnold George Weinmeister (March 23, 1923 June 28, 2000) was a Canadian professional American and Canadian football defensive tackle. He went to four Pro Bowls, but with only a six-year tenure in the All-America Football Conference and National Football League combined, his career is one of the shortest of any Pro Football Hall of Fame member. He was born in Rhein, Saskatchewan. [1]

Contents

Early years

Weinmeister was a two-time All-City tackle in high school, and played end, fullback and tackle during a 4-year tenure at the University of Washington which was interrupted by four years of army service. He was scouted by New York Yankees (AAFC) head coach Ray Flaherty while playing fullback.

Professional career

Weinmeister turned professional in 1948 and played defensive tackle for the New York Yankees in the All-America Football Conference until 1949, and for the New York Giants from 1950 to 1953. During his final season in New York, he served as the team captain. In 1949, Weinmeister won second-team All-AAFC as a rookie followed by first-team All-AAFC honors, was voted All-NFL Choice for four consecutive years (1950–1953), and was selected to play in the NFL's Pro Bowl every year from 1950 to 1953.

He was on the inaugural roster for the BC Lions in 1954, and played for the team for two seasons. He is one of five Saskatchewan natives to make it to the NFL (the other four being Jon Ryan, Rueben Mayes, Ben Heenan, and Brett Jones).

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References

  1. Goldstein, Richard (2000-07-07). "Arnie Weinmeister, 77, a Giants Star in the 50s, Is Dead". The New York Times . Retrieved 29 November 2020.