Arnold Jeter

Last updated

Arnold F. Jeter
Biographical details
Born(1939-02-28)February 28, 1939
DiedJanuary 1, 2022(2022-01-01) (aged 82)
Playing career
1960 Kent State
Position(s) Halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1966 Iowa (freshmen backfield)
1967–1974 Delaware State
1975–1976 Marshall (assistant)
1977–1986 Wisconsin (DL)
1987–1989 Arizona (DL)
1990–1992 Rutgers (associate HC)
1995–2000 New Jersey City (assistant)
2001–2002 New Jersey City
Head coaching record
Overall28–63–1

Arnold F. Jeter (February 28, 1939 – January 1, 2022) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Delaware State University from 1967 to 1974 and New Jersey City University (NJCU) from 2001 to 2002, compiling a career college football coaching record of 28–63–1. A native of Steubenville, Ohio, Jeter played college football at Kent State University as a halfback and was second on the team in scoring as a senior.

Contents

Coaching career

Jeter began coaching football at the junior high and high school levels in Warren, Ohio. From the spring of 1966 to the spring of 1967, he was a backfield coach for the freshman football team at the University of Iowa, where he earned a master's degree in physical education. [1]

Jeter landed his first head coaching job at Delaware State University, a position he held from 1967 to 1974, compiling an overall record of 25–48–1. In 1973 the Hornets went winless, finishing 0–11. From 1975 through 1992, Jeter hopped around as an assistant or associate head coach at Marshall, Wisconsin, Arizona and Rutgers. In 1995, he became an assistant coach at New Jersey City University (NJCU), a position he held for six seasons until being named the program's ninth head coach in January 2001. Jeter was the head coach of the Gothic Knights for only two years until NJCU dropped its football program after the 2002 season due to budget cuts. He remained at NJCU as an assistant athletic director.

Personal life and death

Jeter died on January 1, 2022, at the age of 82. [2]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Delaware State Hornets (Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1967–1970)
1967 Delaware State 2–6–12–3–19th
1968 Delaware State 4–62–413th
1969 Delaware State 4–53–39th
1970 Delaware State 6–24–13rd (Northern)
Delaware State Hornets (Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference)(1971–1974)
1971 Delaware State 1–81–5T–6th
1972 Delaware State 5–42–4T–5th
1973 Delaware State 0–110–67th
1974 Delaware State 3–60–67th
Delaware State:25–48–113–32–1
New Jersey City Gothic Knights (New Jersey Athletic Conference)(2001–2002)
2001 New Jersey City2–71–5T–6th
2002 New Jersey City1–81–56th
New Jersey City:3–152–10
Total:28–63–1

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References

  1. "Arnold Jeter Named Coach at Delaware State". Iowa City Press-Citizen . Iowa City, Iowa. May 9, 1967. p. 12. Retrieved June 24, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  2. "Reverend Arnold F. Jeter, NJCU's Final Football Coach, Dies at 82". New Jersey City University . January 10, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022.