Arnold Nordmeyer

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... the best Prime Minister we never had.

Retirement from politics

Nordmeyer remained in Parliament for another four years, retiring at the 1969 election. [9] At the 1971 local-body elections he was elected a member of the Wellington Hospital Board. [21]

Nordmeyer later held a number of government appointments after retiring from parliament. In 1970 he was appointed chairman of the Freezing Industry Disputes Committee, an appointment which led to him becoming conciliator in several other industrial areas subsequently. In 1974 he was appointed chairman of the board of the New Zealand Superannuation Corporation which was the controlling organisation for the compulsory pension savings' scheme of the Third Labour Government (lead by Kirk). The posting was short-lived however as the subsequent Third National Government were to abolish the commission after winning power the next year. He then became the chairman of Maui Development Ltd and also was a director of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand. [2]

Nordmeyer was one of the staunchest opponents of capital punishment and was also staunchly opposed to abortion, being a patron of New Zealand's main anti-abortion group Society for the Protection of the Unborn Child (SPUC).

Nordmeyer died in Wellington on 2 February 1989, survived by his wife Frances and their two children. His family declined the offer of a state funeral instead opting to scatter his ashes by Lake Ōhau. [1]

Personal life

Nordmeyer married Frances Maria Kernahan in Oamaru on 28 October 1931. The couple had two children, Alan and Alison. Alison married Labour MP Jim Edwards. [1] In the 1989 Queen's Birthday Honours, Lady Nordmeyer was appointed a Companion of the Queen's Service Order for community service. [22] Nordmeyer was a teetotaller and did not smoke. [6]

Honours and recognition

In the 1970 Queen's Birthday Honours, he was appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George, for services to politics. [23] In the 1975 Queen's Birthday Honours, he was promoted to Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George, for public services. [24] On 6 February 1987, Nordmeyer was the fifth appointee to the Order of New Zealand. [1] [25]

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Brown, Bruce. "Nordmeyer, Arnold Henry – Biography". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 6 October 2012.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 "'Nordy' Recalls Old Battles". The New Zealand Herald . 8 December 1980. p. 21.
  3. 1 2 Hobbs 1967, p. 103.
  4. Logan 2008, p. 32.
  5. Wilson 1985, p. 58.
  6. 1 2 3 Hobbs 1967, p. 101.
  7. Wilson 1985, p. 84.
  8. Gustafson 1986, p. 320.
  9. 1 2 Wilson 1985, p. 223.
  10. Logan 2008, pp. 280–1.
  11. Logan 2008, p. 281.
  12. Wilson 1985, p. 88.
  13. 1 2 Hobbs 1967, p. 102.
  14. Hayward 1981, p. 13.
  15. "Labour Holds Grey Lynn in Small Poll". The Evening Post . 20 May 1963. p. 12.
  16. "National Back as Government − One Seat Lost to Labour". The New Zealand Herald . 2 December 1963. p. 1.
  17. Hayward 1981, p. 56.
  18. Hobbs 1967, p. 15.
  19. Logan 2008, p. 421.
  20. Weir, Jim (2007). Strong language: very quotable New Zealand quotes. Auckland: New Holland Publishers. p. 65. ISBN   978-1-86966-182-3.
  21. Petersen, G.A. (19 October 1971). Declaration of Election Results (Report). Wellington City Council.
  22. "No. 51774". The London Gazette (3rd supplement). 17 June 1989. p. 32.
  23. "No. 45119". The London Gazette (3rd supplement). 13 June 1970. p. 6405.
  24. "No. 46595". The London Gazette (3rd supplement). 14 June 1975. p. 7405.
  25. "The Order of New Zealand" (12 February 1987) 20 New Zealand Gazette 705 at 709.

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References

Further reading

Sir Arnold Nordmeyer
Arnold Nordmeyer (1954).jpg
Nordmeyer in 1954
18th Leader of the Opposition
In office
1 April 1963 16 December 1965
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Oamaru
1935–1949
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Brooklyn
1951–1954
Constituency abolished
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Island Bay
1954–1969
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Minister of Health
1941–1947
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Industries and Commerce
1947–1949
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Finance
1957–1960
Succeeded by
Preceded by Leader of the Opposition
1963–1965
Succeeded by
Party political offices
Preceded by President of the Labour Party
1950–1955
Succeeded by
Preceded by Leader of the Labour Party
1963–1965
Succeeded by