Arnott's Biscuits

Last updated

Arnott's Biscuit Limited
TypeSubsidiary
Industry Biscuits
Snack food
Founded1865
Headquarters North Strathfield, Sydney, Australia
Products
Revenue A$1.04 billion (2018)
Owner KKR
Website www.arnotts.com/

Arnott's Biscuits Limited is Australia's largest producer of biscuits and the second-largest supplier of snack food. [1] [2] Founded in 1865, it is a subsidiary of KKR.

Contents

History

Arnott's founder William Arnott William Arnott, circa 1869.jpg
Arnott's founder William Arnott
Biscuit tin on display in museum at Young, New South Wales Arnotts.jpg
Biscuit tin on display in museum at Young, New South Wales

In 1847, Scottish immigrant William Arnott opened a bakery in Morpeth, New South Wales. [3] [ circular reporting? ] Later in 1865 he moved to a bakery on Hunter Street, Newcastle, providing bread, pies and biscuits townspeople and ships docking at the local port. [4] Until 1975 the company was under family control with the descendants of William Arnott, including Halse Rogers Arnott and Geoffrey H. Arnott, acting as Chairman.

Arnott's, in common with the majority of Australian biscuit manufacturers, operated primarily in its home state, New South Wales, but has manufacturing plants in Virginia, Queensland (manufactures only plain, cream and savoury biscuits) and Shepparton, Victoria.[ citation needed ] In 1949 it merged with Morrows Pty Ltd, a Brisbane biscuit manufacturer, forming William Arnotts, Morrow Pty Ltd. [5] In the 1960s, a series of amalgamations and acquisitions in the Australian market resulted in the creation of the Australian Biscuit Company Pty Ltd. [6] This included Arnotts and other companies such as Brockhoff Biscuits, [7] Arnott-Motteram [8] and Menz [9] in South Australia, and Guest's Biscuits [10] in Victoria, and Mills and Ware in Western Australia. [11] The Australian Biscuit Company was later renamed Arnott's Biscuits Pty Ltd.

In 1997, Arnott's Biscuits was subject to an extortion bid by Queenslander Joy Ellen Thomas, aged 72 years, [12] who allegedly threatened to poison packets of Arnott's Monte Carlo biscuits in South Australia and Victoria. The company conducted a massive recall and publicity campaign, publishing the extortionist's threats and demands in full-page newspaper ads. [13] However, Ms. Thomas was not charged with any offence as the prosecution dropped the case against her because of conflicting evidence. [13] The recall cost the company A$22 million, but Arnott's was praised for its openness and honesty in dealing with the crisis. [14]

1932 advertisement for Arnott's Biscuits Arnott's Biscuits Advert 1932.jpg
1932 advertisement for Arnott's Biscuits

In 1997, the Campbell Soup Company of North America, a shareholder of Arnott's since the 1980s, acquired Arnott's in full. Thus, in 1997, Arnott's Biscuits Ltd became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Campbell Soup Company. [15] This caused a significant amount of controversy in Australia, based on the desire for such an Australian icon to remain in Australian hands, and a fear that Campbell's would Americanise the products. [16]

Manufacturing of Arnott's biscuits, however, remained in Australia, and as part of a long-term expansion plan, Arnott's closed its Melbourne factory in September 2002. [17] At the same time, it expanded its facilities in Sydney, Adelaide and Brisbane. [18]

In 2002, Arnott's acquired Snack Foods Limited. [19] In April 2008, Campbell Arnott's sold Arnott's Snackfoods to The Real McCoy Snackfood Co. and the company is now known as Snack Brands Australia. [20]

In July 2019, Campbell Soup Company agreed to sell Arnott's to KKR for $US2.2 billion. [21] < [22] Just weeks after the sale, Arnott's was in a public dispute with Woolworths Supermarkets, which reportedly wanted to charge higher prices for marketing displays. Sources said the dispute had begun in May before agreement was reached for the sale of Arnott's to KKR. [23]

Products

Iced VoVos Iced Vo Vos.jpg
Iced VoVos
A packet of Monte Carlo biscuits Packet of Monte Carlo Biscuits.jpg
A packet of Monte Carlo biscuits
A plate of Tim Tams Tim Tams.jpg
A plate of Tim Tams
SAO biscuits SAO crackers.jpg
SAO biscuits
Wagon Wheel Wagon Wheel.JPG
Wagon Wheel

Arnott's are well known in Australia and internationally for producing several quintessentially Australian biscuits. Some of their major products include:

Related Research Articles

Cookie Small, flat and sweetened baked food (biscuit)

A cookie is a baked or cooked snack or dessert that is typically small, flat and sweet. It usually contains flour, sugar, egg, and some type of oil, fat, or butter. It may include other ingredients such as raisins, oats, chocolate chips, nuts, etc.

Dessert Course that concludes a meal, usually sweet

Dessert is a course that concludes a meal. The course consists of sweet foods, such as confections, and possibly a beverage such as dessert wine and liqueur. In some parts of the world, such as much of Central Africa and West Africa, and most parts of China, there is no tradition of a dessert course to conclude a meal.

Biscuit Sweet baked product

A biscuit is a flour-based baked and shaped food product. In most countries biscuits are typically hard, flat, and unleavened. They are usually sweet and may be made with sugar, chocolate, icing, jam, ginger, or cinnamon. They can also be savoury, similar to crackers. Biscuit may also refer to hard flour-based baked animal feed, as with dog biscuit.

Twix Chocolate Cookie bar

Twix is a caramel shortbread chocolate bar made by Mars, Inc., consisting of a biscuit applied with other confectionery toppings and coatings. Twix are packaged with one, two or four bars in a wrapper.

Wafer Thin type of biscuit

A wafer is a crisp, often sweet, very thin, flat, light and dry cookie, often used to decorate ice cream, and also used as a garnish on some sweet dishes. Wafers can also be made into cookies with cream flavoring sandwiched between them. They frequently have a waffle surface pattern but may also be patterned with insignia of the food's manufacturer or may be patternless. Some chocolate bars, such as Kit Kat and Coffee Crisp, are wafers with chocolate in and around them.

Maxibon Brand of ice cream sandwich made by Froneri

Maxibon is a brand of ice cream sandwich made by Froneri. It consists of a block of ice cream containing small chocolate chips with one end covered in chocolate, and the other sandwiched between two biscuits.

<i>Kuih</i> Southeast Asian snack or dessert foods

Kuih are bite-sized snack or dessert foods commonly found in Southeast Asia and China. It is a fairly broad term which may include items that would be called cakes, cookies, dumplings, pudding, biscuits, or pastries in English and are usually made from rice or glutinous rice. In China, where the term originates from, kueh or koé in the Min Nan languages refers to snacks which are typically made from rice but can occasionally be made from other grains such as wheat. The term kuih is widely used in Malaysia, Brunei, and Singapore, kueh is used in Singapore and Indonesia, kue is used in Indonesia only, all three refer to sweet or savoury desserts.

Cadbury Roses Selection of machine wrapped chocolates made by Cadbury

Cadbury Roses are a selection of machine wrapped chocolates made by Cadbury. Introduced in the UK in 1938, they were thought to be named after the English packaging equipment company "Rose Brothers" based in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, that manufactured and supplied the machines that wrapped the chocolates.

Cadbury Snack

A Cadbury Snack is a shortcake biscuit square or two biscuits with chocolate filling, covered with milk chocolate.

Tim Tam Brand of chocolate biscuits

Tim Tam is a brand of chocolate biscuit introduced by the Australian biscuit company Arnott's in 1964. It consists of two malted biscuits separated by a light hard chocolate cream filling and coated in a thin layer of textured chocolate.

Hello Panda Japanese biscuit snack

Hello Panda is a brand of Japanese biscuit, manufactured by Meiji Seika. It was first released in Japan during 1979. Each biscuit consists of a small hollow shortbread layer, filled with crème of various flavors. Printed on the biscuits are cartoon style depictions of giant pandas doing various activities, such as fencing and archery.

Tiny Teddy

Tiny Teddy is a brand of sweet biscuits manufactured by Arnott's in Australia, since 1991.

Paddle Pop is a brand of ice confection products originally created by Streets, which is now is owned by the English multinational consumer goods company Unilever. It is sold in Australia, New Zealand, and later, a few other countries. It is held for eating by a wooden stick which protrudes at the base. The brand has a mascot known as the Paddle Pop Lion, or Max, who appears on the product wrapper.

Crunch (chocolate bar) Chocolate bar

Crunch is a chocolate bar made of milk chocolate and crisped rice. It weighs 1.55 oz. It is produced globally by Nestlé with the exception of the United States, where it is produced under license by the Ferrara Candy Company, a subsidiary of Ferrero.

Sandwich cookie Cookies kept by two thin cookies or biscuits with filling in between

A sandwich cookie, also known as a sandwich biscuit, is a type of cookie made from two thin cookies or medium cookies with a filling between them. Many types of fillings are used, such as cream, ganache, buttercream, chocolate, cream cheese, jam, peanut butter, lemon curd, or ice cream.

Snack Service of food smaller than a regular meal

A snack is a small portion of food generally eaten between meals. Snacks come in a variety of forms including packaged snack foods and other processed foods, as well as items made from fresh ingredients at home.

References

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Further reading