Arrondissements of France

Last updated

An arrondissement (French pronunciation:  [aʁɔ̃dismɑ̃] ( Loudspeaker.svg listen )) [1] is a level of administrative division in France generally corresponding to the territory overseen by a subprefect. As of 2019, the 101 French departments were divided into 332 arrondissements (including 12 overseas). [2]

Contents

The capital of an arrondissement is called a subprefecture. When an arrondissement contains the prefecture (capital) of the department, that prefecture is the capital of the arrondissement, acting both as a prefecture and as a subprefecture. Arrondissements are further divided into cantons and communes.

The term arrondissement can be roughly translated into English as district. [3]

Role and administration

The administration of an arrondissement is assigned to a subprefect (French : sous-préfet) who assists the departmental prefect (préfet).

Unlike French regions, departments and communes, arrondissements do not have the status of legal entity in public law. In addition, unlike those other administrative divisions, they are not run by elected officials, but by political appointees, officials appointed by the French president.

History

The concept of arrondissements was proposed several times as an administrative reform during the Ancien Régime , notably by the intendant of the généralité of Brittany, Caze de La Bove, in his Mémoire concernant les subdélégués de l'intendance de Bretagne in 1775.

The arrondissements were created after the French Revolution by the Loi du 28 pluviôse in the year VIII of the Republican Calendar (17 February 1800) and replaced "districts". In certain periods in French history, they have served a role in legislative elections, especially during the Third Republic. In 1926, 106 arrondissements were suppressed by the government. [4] [5] While it claimed it was to achieve fiscal savings, some political analysts considered the results electoral manipulation. Some of these suppressed arrondissements were restored in 1942.

Changes

The most recent creations and disestablishments of arrondissements are listed in the table below.

YearDepartmentCreated arrondissement(s)Disbanded arrondissement(s)
2015 Moselle Forbach-Boulay-Moselle Forbach, Boulay-Moselle
2015 Moselle Metz Metz-Campagne, Metz-Ville
2015 Moselle Sarrebourg-Château-Salins Château-Salins, Sarrebourg
2015 Moselle Thionville Thionville-Est, Thionville-Ouest
2015 Bas-Rhin Haguenau-Wissembourg Haguenau, Wissembourg
2015 Bas-Rhin Strasbourg Strasbourg-Campagne, Strasbourg-Ville
2015 Haut-Rhin Colmar-Ribeauvillé Colmar, Ribeauvillé
2015 Haut-Rhin Thann-Guebwiller Guebwiller, Thann
2017 Loire-Atlantique Châteaubriant-Ancenis Ancenis, Châteaubriant
2017 Marne - Sainte-Menehould

Statistics

Most departments have only three or four arrondissements. The departments of Paris and of the Territory of Belfort have only one, while the department of Pas-de-Calais has seven. Mayotte has none.

See also

Related Research Articles

In the administrative divisions of France, the department is one of the three levels of government under the national level, between the administrative regions and the communes. Ninety-six departments are in metropolitan France, and five are overseas departments, which are also classified as overseas regions. Departments are further subdivided into 334 arrondissements, themselves divided into cantons; the last two have no autonomy, and are used for the organisation of police, fire departments, and sometimes, elections.

An arrondissement is any of various administrative divisions of France, Belgium, Haiti, certain other Francophone countries, as well as the Netherlands.

A prefecture is an administrative jurisdiction or subdivision in any of various countries and within some international church structures, and in antiquity a Roman district governed by an appointed prefect.

Prefectures in France deconcentrated executive authority of the French State, in charge of the administrative control of public services and territorial collectivities operating on its local territory

A prefecture in France may refer to:

Haute-Vienne Department of France

Haute-Vienne is a French department named after the river Vienne. It is one of the 12 departments that together constitute the French region of Nouvelle-Aquitaine. The neighbouring departments are: Creuse, Corrèze, Dordogne, Charente, Vienne and Indre.

Subprefectures in France administrative subdivision of a French prefecture and capital of an arrondissement

In France, a subprefecture is the administrative center of a departmental arrondissement that does not contain the prefecture for its department. The term also applies to the building that houses the administrative headquarters for an arrondissement.

Dakar Region Region in Senegal

Dakar Region is the smallest and most populated Region of Senegal, encompassing the capital city of the country, Dakar, and all its suburbs along the Cap–Vert Peninsula, Africa's most westerly point.

Administrative divisions of France Class grouping all types of territorial divisions of France (administrative or electoral)

The administrative divisions of France are concerned with the institutional and territorial organization of French territory. These territories are located in many parts of the world. There are many administrative divisions, which may have political, electoral (districts), or administrative objectives. All the inhabited territories are represented in the National Assembly, Senate and Economic and Social Council and their citizens have French citizenship.

Prefect (France) French states representative in a department or region

A prefect in France is the state's representative in a department or region. Subprefects are responsible for the subdivisions of departments, arrondissements. The office of a prefect is known as a prefecture and that of a sub-prefect as a subprefecture.

In France, a municipal arrondissement is a subdivision of the commune, and is used in the country's three largest cities: Paris, Lyon and Marseille. It functions as an even lower administrative division, with its own mayor. Although usually referred to simply as "arrondissements", they should not be confused with departmental arrondissements, which are groupings of communes within one département.

An administrative centre is a seat of regional administration or local government, or a county town, or the place where the central administration of a commune is located.

The French special collectivity of New Caledonia is divided into three provinces, which in turn are divided into 33 communes. There is also a system of eight tribal areas for the indigenous Kanak people, and three decentralized subdivisions.

Dakar Department Department in Dakar Region, Senegal

Dakar Department is one of the Departments of Senegal, located in the Dakar Region.

The administrative divisions of Haiti are concerned with the institutional and territorial organization of Haitian territory. There are many administrative divisions which may have political, electoral (districts), or administrative objectives.

Council of Paris body governing the capital of France

The Council of Paris is the deliberative body responsible for the governing of Paris, the capital of France. It possesses simultaneously the powers of a Paris Municipal Council and those of a General Council for the Département de Paris, as defined by the so-called PLM Law of 1982 that redefined the governance of Paris, Lyon, and Marseilles. Paris is the only territorial collectivity in France to be at once a commune and a département.

Communes of Mali

A Commune is the third level administrative unit in Mali. Mali is divided into eight regions and one capital district (Bamako). These subdivisions bear the name of their principal city. The regions are divided into 49 Cercles. The Cercles and the district are divided into 703 Communes, with 36 Urban Communes and 667 Rural Communes, while some larger Cercles still contain Arrondissements above the Commune level, these are organisational areas with no independent power or office. Rural Communes are subdivided in Villages, while Urban Communes are subdivided into Quartier. Communes usually bear the name of their principal town. The capital, Bamako, consists of six Urban Communes. There were initially 701 communes until the Law No. 01-043 of 7 June 2001 created two new Rural Communes in the desert region in the north east of the country: Alata, Ménaka Cercle in the Gao Region and Intadjedite, Tin-Essako Cercle in the Kidal Region.

Dakar-Plateau Commune darrondissement in Dakar Region, Senegal

Dakar-Plateau is an arrondissement in the Dakar Department, and forms the central district of the city of Dakar.

A subprefect is a high government official in several countries, including Brazil and France.

Administration of Paris

As the capital of France, Paris is the seat of France's national government. For the executive, the two chief officers each have their own official residences, which also serve as their offices. The President of France resides at the Élysée Palace in the 8th arrondissement, while the Prime Minister's seat is at the Hôtel Matignon in the 7th arrondissement. Government ministries are located in various parts of the city; many are located in the 7th arrondissement, near the Matignon.

References

  1. "Circonscriptions administratives au 1er janvier 2015 : comparaisons départementales" [Administrative constituencies of 1 January 2015: departmental comparisons] (in French). INSEE . Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  2. Téléchargement - Année 2019: Liste des arrondissements
  3. André de Laubadère, Jean-Claude Vénézia, Yves Gaudemet, Traité de droit administratif, 12th edition, LGDJ, 1992, vol. 1, nr. 168-169.
  4. Nicolas Verdier, La réforme des arrondissements de 1926 : un choix d'intervention entre espace et territoire, online
  5. List of the arrondissements suppressed in 1926