Arthur Dreifuss

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Arthur Dreifuss
Arthur Dreifuss (1965).jpg
Arrival of Dreifuss at Schiphol on May 10, 1965.
Born(1908-03-25)March 25, 1908
Frankfurt, Germany [1]
DiedDecember 31, 1993(1993-12-31) (aged 85)
Los Angeles, California
Occupation Film director, theatrical producer, choreographer
Years active1931 - 1968
Spouse(s)Ruth Cross, April 27, 1934 - ? [2]
Barbara Brier (September 23, 1949–September 12, 1956; divorced) [3]
Children4 [4] [3]

Arthur Dreifuss (sometimes credited as Dreyfuss; March 25, 1908 – December 31, 1993) [1] [4] was a German-born American film director, and occasional producer, screenwriter and choreographer.

Contents

Dreifuss was active from 1939 through 1968, directing about 50 films and producing a few Columbia Pictures short subjects. Toward the end of his career, Dreifuss concentrated on youth culture films and exploitation movies.

Selected filmography

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References

  1. 1 2 Singer, Michael. Film Directors: A Complete Guide. Beverly Hills, CA: Lone Eagle Publishing. Page 106. ISBN   0-943728-15-0
  2. Arthur Dreifuss New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1829-1940 . FamilySearch.
  3. 1 2 "Highball Glass Dodging Actress Given Divorce". The Los Angeles Times. September 13, 1956. Page 45. Retrieved March 1, 2021.
  4. 1 2 "Arthur Dreifuss, 85; Producer, Director for Movies, Television". The Los Angeles Times . January 7, 1994. Page A24. Retrieved March 1, 2021.

Further reading