Arthur Mailey

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Arthur Mailey
Arthur Mailey c1910.jpg
Mailey in 1910
Personal information
Full nameArthur Alfred Mailey
Born(1886-01-03)3 January 1886
Zetland, New South Wales, Australia
Died31 December 1967(1967-12-31) (aged 81)
Kirrawee, New South Wales, Australia
Height174 cm (5 ft 9 in)
BattingRight-hand batsman
BowlingRight-arm leg break and googly
RoleBowler
International information
National side
Test debut(cap  108)17 December 1920 v  England
Last Test14 August 1926 v  England
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
1912–1930 New South Wales
Career statistics
Competition Test First-class
Matches21158
Runs scored2221,530
Batting average 11.1012.33
100s/50s0/00/3
Top score46* 66
Balls bowled6,11936,285
Wickets 99779
Bowling average 33.9124.09
5 wickets in innings 661
10 wickets in match216
Best bowling9/12110/66
Catches/stumpings 14/–157/–
Source: ESPNcricinfo, 23 March 2017

Arthur Alfred Mailey (3 January 1886 31 December 1967) was an Australian cricketer who played in 21 Test matches between 1920 and 1926. [1]

Contents

Mailey used leg-break and googly bowling, taking 99 Test wickets, including 36 in the 1920–21 Ashes series. In the second innings of the fourth Test at Melbourne, he took nine wickets for 121 runs, which is still the Test record for an Australian bowler. [2] [3]

In first-class cricket at Cheltenham during the 1921 tour, he took all ten Gloucestershire wickets for 66 runs in the second innings. His 1958 autobiography was accordingly titled 10 for 66 and All That (an allusion to the humorous book of English history, 1066 and All That ).

He also holds the record for the most expensive bowling analysis in first-class cricket. Bowling for New South Wales at Melbourne in 1926–27 as Victoria scored the record first-class total of 1107, Mailey bowled 64 eight-ball overs, did not manage a maiden and took 4 for 362. [4] [5] He said that his figures would have been much better had not three sitters been dropped off his bowling – "two by a man in the pavilion wearing a bowler hat" and one by an unfortunate team-mate whom he consoled with the words, "I'm expecting to take a wicket any day now."

Beginning his working life as a labourer, he became a talented writer and artist. Between 1920 and 1953, he published a number of booklets of cartoons of cricketers of his time. [6]

"Someone dubbed him the man who bowled like a millionaire, and how true it was! Arthur's objective was to take wickets, and the spending of runs in the process bothered him little. For a relatively small man Arthur had abnormally large hands, soft as silk to the touch, and he once told me he didn't know what it was to have tired or sore fingers". Don Bradman [7]

Mailey married Miss Maud Hinchcllffe in 1912. They had three sons, and a daughter. [8]

Mailey died in Kirrawee, New South Wales on 31 December 1967, 3 days before his 82nd birthday.

See also

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References

  1. "ARTHUR MAILEY". The Brisbane Courier (21, 334). Queensland, Australia. 11 June 1926. p. 13. Retrieved 7 June 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  2. "Australian Test records – Best bowling figures in an innings". ESPNcricinfo . Retrieved 12 March 2017.
  3. "ARTHUR MAILEY". The Queenslander (2846). Queensland, Australia. 19 March 1921. p. 3. Retrieved 7 June 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  4. Frindall, Bill (1998). The Wisden Book of Cricket Records (Fourth ed.). London: Headline Book Publishing. p. 264. ISBN   0747222037.
  5. "Victoria v New South Wales at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, 24–29 Dec 1926". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 23 March 2017.
  6. Arlott, John (6 March 1980). "A cricket treasury". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 23 March 2017.
  7. Bradman, Donald (1977) Introduction to E.W. Swanton, Swanton in Australia with MCC 1946–75, Fontana. ISBN   0006345166.
  8. "ARTHUR MAILEY'S WIFE DEAD". The Argus (Melbourne) (28, 562). Victoria, Australia. 8 March 1938. p. 2. Retrieved 7 June 2018 via National Library of Australia.