Arthur Miller (cinematographer)

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Arthur Charles Miller
The House of Hate (1918) - 1.jpg
Miller at Cliffhanger Point filming Pearl White and Antonio Moreno in The House of Hate (1918)
Born
Arthur Charles Miller

(1895-07-08)July 8, 1895
DiedJuly 13, 1970(1970-07-13) (aged 75)
Hollywood, California, US
NationalityAmerican
Occupation Cinematographer
Years active1914–1951
Employer Fox Film Corporation
Board member of American Society of Cinematographers (A.S.C.) founder (1918) and president (1954-1956)
Awards Academy Award for Best Cinematography
How Green Was My Valley (1941)
The Song of Bernadette (1944)
Anna and the King of Siam (1947)

Arthur Charles Miller, A.S.C. (July 8, 1895 July 13, 1970) was an American cinematographer. He was nominated for the Oscar for Best Cinematography six times, winning three times: for How Green Was My Valley in 1941, The Song of Bernadette in 1944, and Anna and the King of Siam in 1947. [1]

Contents

Career

Born in Roslyn, New York, he began his movie career at the age of 13. According to a 1970 interview with Leonard Maltin, he once worked for a horse dealer. One day, he was returning home from delivering some horses and was sitting on a horse when a man offered him a job in motion pictures because he could ride bareback. Miller recalled, "The first day we went out to a golf course in Brooklyn, and I rode this horse all over, got chased, and all." [2] He found himself working as an assistant to filmmaker Fred J. Balshofer. [2] The two remained lifelong friends and in 1967 co-wrote the book about the early days of film titled One Reel a Week.

Miller eventually joined Pathé and, although only 19 years old, became the cinematographer for the 1914 adventure serial The Perils of Pauline . He worked for Astra Film Co. and then Solax Studios in New Jersey.

In 1918, he and his brother Bill founded the Motion Picture Industry Union.[ citation needed ] He moved to Hollywood and had a lengthy tenure at Paramount from the late teens throughout the 1920s. In 1932, Miller signed a long-term contract with Fox Film Corporation to be the cinematographer for every Shirley Temple film. He retired in 1951 for health reasons but remained active in the industry as president of the American Society of Cinematographers.

He died in Los Angeles, California, in 1970 and was interred in the Hollywood Memorial Park Cemetery. [3]

In August 1973, his widow Mae Miller and Donald Crisp attended the dedication of the Arthur Miller Memorial Fountain and Arbor at the Motion Picture & Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills. [3]

Partial filmography

* - according to silentera.com

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References

  1. "The Official Academy Awards® Database". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on 2012-02-16. Retrieved 2019-02-21.
  2. 1 2 Maltin, Leonard (July 25, 2012). The Art of the Cinematographer. Courier Corporation. pp. 117–137. ISBN   9780486154749 . Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  3. 1 2 "Arthur Miller Memorial Fountain and Arbor". Van Nuys News. August 7, 1973 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg