Artistic Gymnastics World Cup

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Artistic Gymnastics World Cup
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Gymnastics current event.svg 2019 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series
Sport Gymnastics
Founded 1975
CountriesWorldwide

The Artistic Gymnastics World Cup is a competition series for artistic gymnastics sanctioned by the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG). It is one of the few tournaments in artistic gymnastics officially organized by FIG, as well as the World Championships and the gymnastics competitions at the Olympic Games and the Youth Olympics. [1] Beginning in the 2017-2020 quadrennium, the All-Around and Individual Apparatus World Cup series will be used to qualify a maximum of seven spots to the Olympic Games. [2]

Artistic gymnastics is a discipline of gymnastics in which athletes perform short routines on different apparatuses, with less time for vaulting. The sport is governed by the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG), which designs the code of points and regulates all aspects of international elite competition. Within individual countries, gymnastics is regulated by national federations, such as Gymnastics Canada, British Gymnastics, and USA Gymnastics. Artistic gymnastics is a popular spectator sport at many competitions, including the Summer Olympic Games.

The Artistic Gymnastics World Championships are the world championships for artistic gymnastics governed by the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG). The first edition of the championship was held in 1903, exclusively for male gymnasts. Since the tenth edition of the tournament, in 1934, women's events are held together with men's events. As of 2017, over sixty different editions of the championships have been staged, and over forty different countries have earned medals in both men's and women's artistic gymnastics events. The most successful nation, both in gold medal results and total number of medals, is Soviet Union. China is the second most successful country in total medals earned, and Japan is the third most successful nation at the championships. Russia, Romania, and the United States are also usually among the most dominant nations, especially in women's artistic gymnastics events. Currently, the championship is held annually on non-Olympic years.

Gymnastics at the Summer Olympics

Gymnastics events have been contested at every Summer Olympic Games since the birth of the modern Olympic movement at the 1896 Summer Olympics in Athens. For 32 years, only men were allowed to compete. Beginning at the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, women were allowed to compete in artistic gymnastics events as well. Rhythmic gymnastics events were introduced at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, and trampoline events were added at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney.

Contents

History

The Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG) hosted the first artistic gymnastics on an international scale in 1975. This genre of sport from then onwards was named as the Artistic Gymnastics World Cup, an original competition reserved for the current best gymnasts. It was composed of a single and unique event, bringing together very few gymnasts in all around competition and in apparatus finals. This initiative was taken in a particular context, since the world championships took place merely every four years. [3] The world cup event held every year for artistic gymnastics was, however, upheld only until 1990.

In 1997, the World Cup was revived as a series of qualifying events for a period of two years, culminating in a final event that was known as the World Cup Final. The different stages, sometimes referred to as World Cup Qualifiers, mostly served the purpose of awarding points to individual gymnasts and groups according to their placements. These points would be added up over the two-year period to qualify a limited number of athletes to the biennial World Cup Final event. [4] Six World Cup Final events were staged in even years from 1998 to 2008. For example, the World Cup Final competition in 1998 served as the last stage of a series of competitions through the 1997–1998 season. At the World Cup Final, gold, silver and bronze medals were awarded to individual athletes in each apparatus.

Eight standalone World Cup events had been staged from 1975 to 1990, and FIG retroactively named these events World Cup Final. [4] The gymnasts were invited to these world cups based on results from the previous world championships or Olympic Games. From 1997 to 2008, the World Cup series of qualifying events were the only way athletes could qualify for the World Cup Final. At the FIG Council in Cape Town (South Africa) in May 2008, members decided to no longer run any world cup and series finals for all FIG disciplines from January 2009. [5]

Cape Town Capital city of the Western Cape province and legislative capital of South Africa

Cape Town is the oldest city in South Africa, colloquially named the Mother City. It is the legislative capital of South Africa and primate city of the Western Cape province. It forms part of the City of Cape Town metropolitan municipality.

In 2011, the apparatus competitions were renamed World Challenge Cups while the all-around competitions kept the World Cup name. In 2013, FIG created three distinct competition series with the reintroduction of the Individual Apparatus World Cup series, along with the existing All-Around World Cup series and the World Challenge Cup series.

Current Format

Beginning in 2009, the World Cup has been competed strictly as a series of stages with no culminating final event. In each of the stages, the top three gymnasts in each apparatus or the all-around, depending on the type of competition, are awarded medals and prize money. [6] [7] There are currently three separate series run by the FIG: the All-Around World Cup series (C-II), the Individual Apparatus Word Cup (C-III) series, and the World Challenge Cup series. For the All-Around World Cup series, gymnasts' standing counts toward their countries' final placement. For the latter two series, gymnasts' standing counts toward their own individual ranking, and they do not pool results with their teammates.

The two individual apparatus series are open to all athletes and are especially popular among athletes from countries with smaller gymnastics programs. The All-Around World Cup series, however, is an invitation-only series of competitions for the top countries at the previous year's World Championships or Olympic Games. [8] Each of the eight competing countries at any given cup has the option to choose any one gymnast to compete with the exception of the host country, which has a wild-card spot for a second gymnast.

After each stage, all gymnasts (not just medal winners) are awarded points according to their placement, with the winner of each competition receiving the maximum number of 30 points per competition. After the last event of the World Cup series, the three or four best results at the World Cup stages count towards a ranking list. The same is true for the World Challenge Cup series. The individual gymnast with the highest number of points in each apparatus is then declared the winner of the series. For the All-Around World Cup, the country with the most points total is victorious. Only the winning nation receives a cup at the end of the series, while the top three gymnasts receive prize money.

The All-Around World Cup and the World Challenge Cup series are both one-year long series, with the competing nations at the All-Around World Cup series changing yearly. For the Individual Apparatus World Cup, the winner in each apparatus is declared after a two-year long series, beginning shortly after the World Championships or Olympic Games in an even-numbered year and concluding two years later.

Olympic Qualification

FIG announced prior to the 2016 Summer Olympics that the test event for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan and subsequent Olympics would no longer serve to qualify additional teams and individual event specialists. Instead, placements at the World Championships in the two years prior to the Olympics would determine the qualified teams, while individual athletes would have a number of ways to qualify: World Championships all-around and event placement, all-around placement at the numerous continental championships in the Olympic Year, and the Cup series.

FIG later released a video explaining the specifics of the new qualification process, including the role of the various World Cup series. [9] While the World Challenge Cup Series remains strictly a series of individual competitions, the final All-Around World Cup (C-II) series and Individual Apparatus World Cup (C-III) series gain importance as they allow gymnasts to qualify additional spots to the Olympic Games. Specifically, the first, second, and third-place finishing countries in the All-Around World Cup series in the Olympic year each qualify a non-nominative spot to the Olympic Games in addition to the four team spots qualified at a previous World Championship. The winning countries are announced in the spring, and they are required to give the spot to a gymnast by the deadline shortly before the Olympics that summer.

The Individual Apparatus World Cup series allows four additional gymnasts to qualify Olympic spots. The overall winner on each apparatus for the series beginning two years before the Olympics and concluding the spring of the Olympic year wins a nominative spot to the Olympics, meaning they are not dependent on their countries' federation to grant them a spot. Each gymnast can only qualify as the winner of one event, meaning if a gymnast wins the series on both uneven bars and balance beam, they still only use one of the available spots to qualify to the Olympics.

Additionally, countries that have already qualified a full team at a prior World Championship can only win up to one additional spot from each Cup series. If a gymnast from a previously qualified country wins the overall vault series title, and another gymnast from the same country wins the floor exercise title, a tiebreaker is used to determine which one qualifies to the Olympic Games. However, if the overall winners of the two apparatus series are both from a country which has not qualified a full team at the World Championships, both advance to the Olympics.

The FIG also announced a policy to prevent countries from using one gymnast to qualify multiple spots to the Olympics so that the spots would be most accurately distributed based on a country's depth. Gymnasts are not allowed to qualify spots from multiple different ways. Spots are awarded in chronological order, meaning the first spots are awarded at the World Championships in the two years prior to the Olympics, followed by the non-nominative spots won by countries in the All-Around World Cup series in the spring of the Olympic year, followed by the nominative spots won by individual gymnasts in the Individual Apparatus World Cup series, followed by the non-nominative spots won by gymnasts at the continental championships generally held in the summer.

The qualification rule combined with the chronological awarding of spots has two major consequences. First, since countries that qualified full teams are only eligible for two additional, non-team spots, if they win a non-nominative spot at the All-Around World Cup series and a nominative spot at the Individual Apparatus World Cup series, they are ineligible to earn a third additional spot, even if their gymnast wins the continental championship. Second, gymnasts who competed at the World Championships and qualified a spot with the team are not eligible to qualify a spot through the Individual Apparatus World Cup series or the continental championships, as these spots, whether nominative or non-nominative, are won by an individual gymnast. They are, however, still eligible to be named to a non-nominative individual spot for their country and compete at the Olympics as long as an eligible gymnast won the spot they are using. Despite this option, in 2018 several gymnasts decided to try to win a nominative spot through the Individual Apparatus World Cup series over the next two years. In anticipation of their countries' qualifying a full team to the Olympics at the 2018 World Championships, several gymnasts, most notably uneven bars specialist Fan Yilin of China, vault and floor exercise specialist Jade Carey of the United States, and vault specialist Maria Paseka of Russia announced that they would not try to qualify for the World Championships so that they would not be prevented from qualifying a nominative spot through the Individual Apparatus World Cup series.

Events

World Cup series

In 2009 and 2010, events in the Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series were divided into Category A events (reserved for invited athletes only) and Category B events (open to all athletes). In 2011 and 2012, the individual apparatus competitions were renamed World Challenge Cup events while the all-around competitions retained the World Cup name. Since 2013, the World Cup series has been divided into three groups: 1) the All-Around World Cup series; 2) the World Challenge Cup series; and 3) the Individual Apparatus World Cup series. All of the World Challenge Cup and Individual Apparatus World Cup competitions remain open to all athletes, while the All-Around World Cup competitions are by invitation only, according to the results of the previous World Championships or Olympic Games. [10]

YearSeriesIndividual Apparatus
World Cup events
All-Around
World Cup events
World Challenge
Cup events
2009 2009 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series 8N/AN/A
2010 2010 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series 12N/AN/A
2011 2011 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series N/A48
2012 2012 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series N/A37
2013 2013 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series 145
2014 2014 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series N/A46
2015 2015 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series N/A17
2016 2016 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series 1310
2017 2017 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series 336
2018 2018 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series 446
2019 2019 FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series 446

World Cup Final

YearEventLocationType
1975 1st World Cup Final Flag of the United Kingdom.svg London All-around (C-II) and apparatus (C-III)
1977 2nd World Cup Final Flag of Spain.svg Oviedo All-around (C-II) and apparatus (C-III)
1978 3rd World Cup Final Flag of Brazil.svg São Paulo All-around (C-II) and apparatus (C-III)
1979 4th World Cup Final Flag of Japan.svg Tokyo All-around (C-II) and apparatus (C-III)
1980 5th World Cup Final Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Toronto All-around (C-II) and apparatus (C-III)
1982 6th World Cup Final Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Zagreb All-around (C-II) and apparatus (C-III)
1986 7th World Cup Final Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Beijing All-around (C-II) and apparatus (C-III)
1990 8th World Cup Final Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Brussels All-around (C-II) and apparatus (C-III)
1998 9th World Cup Final Flag of Japan.svg Sabae Apparatus (C-III)
2000 10th World Cup Final Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Glasgow Apparatus (C-III)
2002 11th World Cup Final Flag of Germany.svg Stuttgart Apparatus (C-III)
2004 12th World Cup Final Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Birmingham Apparatus (C-III)
2006 13th World Cup Final Flag of Brazil.svg São Paulo Apparatus (C-III)
2008 14th World Cup Final Flag of Spain.svg Madrid Apparatus (C-III)

Successful nations

What follows is a list of nations which have earned at least one medal at the Artistic Gymnastics World Cup circuit. Results accounted for include: 1) the standalone World Cup events staged eight times from 1975 to 1990; 2) World Cup Qualifiers (i.e., stages which merely qualified for the World Cup Final) held by FIG from 1997 to 2008; 3) FIG World Cup Final events, held six times between 1998 and 2008; 4) both Category A and Category B World Cup formats of the World Cup Qualifiers (1997 to 2008) and World Cup Series (2009 and 2010); and 5) all of the World Cup (2009 to 2018) and World Challenge Cup (2011 to 2018) events.

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

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  5. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 7 February 2013. Retrieved 12 August 2012.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  6. http://www.fig-gymnastics.com/vsite/vcontent/content/transnews/0,10869,5187-187975-19728-44545-312649-17968-5233-layout188-205197-news-item,00.html%5B%5D
  7. "SportCentric.com". Archived from the original on 29 February 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
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  9. FIG Channel (2018-05-24), How Artistic gymnasts qualify for TOKYO 2020 - We are Gymnastics ! , retrieved 2018-10-09
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  12. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Gymnastics Results - 2014 Ljubljana Challenge Cup
  13. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Gymnastics Results - 2015 Doha Challenge Cup
  14. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Gymnastics Results - 2016 Szombathely Challenge Cup
  15. 1 2 3 4 5 Gymnastics Results - 2016 Baku Challenge Cup
  16. 1 2 3 4 5 Gymnastics Results - 2015 Varna Challenge Cup
  17. 1 2 Gymnastics Results - 2014 Doha Challenge Cup
  18. 1 2 Gymnastics Results - 2015 São Paulo Challenge Cup
  19. Gymnastics Results - 2017 Doha Challenge Cup
  20. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Gymnastics Results - 2015 Anadia Challenge Cup
  21. 1 2 Gymnastics Results - 2005 Maribor World Cup
  22. 1 2 3 Gymn-Forum - 1977 World Cup
  23. 1 2 3 4 GymMedia - 2003 Thessaloniki World Cup
  24. AGF 2018
  25. 1 2 3 GymMedia - 1999/2000 World Cup Circuit
  26. Results - 2018 Melbourne World Cup
  27. GymMedia - 2011 Doha Challenge Cup
  28. 1 2 Gymnastics Results - 2011 Maribor Challenge Cup
  29. Gymnastics Results - 2016 Mersin Challenge Cup
  30. Gymnastics Results - 2016 Varna Challenge Cup
  31. 1 2 Gymnastics Results - 2016 Ljubljana Challenge Cup
  32. Gimnasia Latina - 2018 Paris World Cup (in Spanish)
  33. FIG - 2017 Cottbus World Cup results
  34. GymMedia - 2005/2006 medal winners
  35. Gymnastics Results - 2006 Maribor World Cup
  36. Gymnastics Results - 2010 Doha World Cup
  37. Gymnastics Results - 2007 Moscow World Cup
  38. Gymn-Forum - 1978 World Cup