Asbury Latimer

Last updated
Asbury Churchwell Latimer
AsburyLatimer.jpg
United States Senator
from South Carolina
In office
March 4, 1903 February 20, 1908
Preceded by John L. McLaurin
Succeeded by Frank B. Gary
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from South Carolina's 3rd district
In office
March 4, 1893 March 3, 1903
Preceded by George Johnstone
Succeeded by Wyatt Aiken
Personal details
Born(1851-07-31)July 31, 1851
Lowndesville, South Carolina
DiedFebruary 20, 1908(1908-02-20) (aged 56)
Washington, D.C.
Resting place Belton, South Carolina
Political party Democratic

Asbury Churchwell Latimer (July 31, 1851 February 20, 1908) was a United States Representative and Senator from South Carolina. Born near Lowndesville, South Carolina, he attended the common schools, engaged in agricultural pursuits, and in 1880 moved to Belton, South Carolina and devoted his time to farming.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress which, along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol Building, in Washington, D.C.

South Carolina U.S. state in the United States

South Carolina is a state in the Southeastern United States and the easternmost of the Deep South. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the southwest by Georgia across the Savannah River.

Lowndesville, South Carolina Town in South Carolina, United States

Lowndesville is a town in Abbeville County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 128 at the 2010 census.

Contents

Latimer was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-third and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1903). He did not seek renomination in 1902, having become a candidate for US Senator. He was elected to the U.S. Senate and served from March 4, 1903, until his death in 1908.

During his service in the Senate, he was appointed in 1907 a member of the United States Immigration Commission.

He died of peritonitis in Washington, D.C. in 1908; interment was in Belton Cemetery, Belton, South Carolina.

Peritonitis inflammation of the peritoneum, the lining of the inner wall of the abdomen

Peritonitis is inflammation of the peritoneum, the lining of the inner wall of the abdomen and cover of the abdominal organs. Symptoms may include severe pain, swelling of the abdomen, fever, or weight loss. One part or the entire abdomen may be tender. Complications may include shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, the first president of the United States and a Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city, located on the Potomac River bordering Maryland and Virginia, is one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

Belton, South Carolina City in South Carolina, United States

Belton is a city in eastern Anderson County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 4,134 at the 2010 census.

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References

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

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U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
George Johnstone
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 3rd congressional district

1893–1903
Succeeded by
Wyatt Aiken
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
John L. McLaurin
U.S. Senator (Class 3) from South Carolina
19031908
Served alongside: Benjamin R. Tillman
Succeeded by
Frank B. Gary