Aubrey Abbott

Last updated


Aubrey Abbott
Aubrey Abbott.jpg
Administrator of the Northern Territory
In office
29 March 1937 1 July 1946
Preceded by Robert Weddell
Succeeded by Arthur Driver
Minister for Home and Territories
In office
29 November 1928 22 October 1929
Prime Minister Stanley Bruce
Preceded by Neville Howse
Succeeded by Arthur Blakeley (Home Affairs)
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Gwydir
In office
19 December 1931 28 March 1937
Preceded by Lou Cunningham
Succeeded by William Scully
In office
14 November 1925 12 October 1929
Preceded by Lou Cunningham
Succeeded by Lou Cunningham
Personal details
Born(1886-05-04)4 May 1886
St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia
Died30 April 1975(1975-04-30) (aged 88)
Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia
Political party Country
Spouse(s) Hilda Gertrude Hartnett
Relations Sir Joseph Abbott (uncle)
Joe Abbott (cousin)
Mac Abbott (cousin)
OccupationJackeroo, soldier

Charles Lydiard Aubrey Abbott (4 May 1886 – 30 April 1975) was an Australian politician and administrator of the Northern Territory. He was born at St Leonards, Sydney, to Thomas Kingsmill Abbott, a magistrate, and Marion, née Lydiard. He came from a political family – his uncles, Sir Joseph Abbott and William Abbott, had served in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, while his cousins, Joe Abbott and Mac Abbott, would later enter Federal parliament.

Administrator of the Northern Territory representative of the Australian government in the Northern Territory

The Administrator of the Northern Territory is an official appointed by the Governor-General of Australia to represent the government of the Commonwealth in the Northern Territory. He or she performs functions similar to those of a state governor.

St Leonards, New South Wales Suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

St Leonards is a suburb on the lower North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. St Leonards is located 5 km north-west of the Sydney central business district and lies across the local government areas of Municipality of Lane Cove, North Sydney Council and the City of Willoughby.

Joseph Palmer Abbott Speaker of the Legislative Assembly

Sir Joseph Palmer Abbott, was an Australian politician and solicitor.

Contents

Early life and military service

Educated at The King's School, Sydney, he left school at 14 to work as a jackeroo near Gunnedah; he also attempted to become an actor in Sydney and a stockman in Queensland. He joined the New South Wales Police Force and on 1914 enlisted in the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force, and then transferred to the Australian Imperial Force, and served in New Guinea, Gallipoli, and Sinai. He married Hilda Gertrude Hartnett on 24 October 1916 in Westminster Cathedral in London, where he had been sent after falling ill in the trenches. He returned to World War I in 1917, and took part in the Egyptian Expeditionary Force advance to Damascus. He was wounded in 1918, and promoted to captain. He returned to Australia in 1920.

Jackaroo (trainee) trainee stockman on a sheep or cattle station

A jackaroo is a young man working on a sheep or cattle station, to gain practical experience in the skills needed to become an owner, overseer, manager, etc. The word originated in Queensland, Australia in the 19th century and is still in use in Australia and New Zealand in the 21st century. Its origins are unclear, although it is firmly rooted in Australian English, Australian culture and in the traditions of the Australian stockmen.

Queensland North-east state of Australia

Queensland is the second-largest and third-most populous state in the Commonwealth of Australia. Situated in the north-east of the country, it is bordered by the Northern Territory, South Australia and New South Wales to the west, south-west and south respectively. To the east, Queensland is bordered by the Coral Sea and Pacific Ocean. To its north is the Torres Strait, with Papua New Guinea located less than 200 km across it from the mainland. The state is the world's sixth-largest sub-national entity, with an area of 1,852,642 square kilometres (715,309 sq mi).

New South Wales Police Force primary law enforcement agency of New South Wales, Australia

The New South Wales Police Force is the primary law enforcement agency of the state of New South Wales, Australia. It is a servant of the Crown, independent of Government, although a minister of the Crown has administration. Divided into Police Area Commands (PACs), for metropolitan areas of NSW and Police Districts (PDs), for regional and country areas of NSW, the NSW Police Force consists of more than 500 local police stations and covers an area of 801,600 square kilometres in a state of some seven million people.

Member of Parliament

Abbott bought a property near Tamworth, New South Wales, financed by his uncle William, and became active in the Graziers' Association of New South Wales and the Northern New State League. He made an unsuccessful attempt to enter the New South Wales Legislative Assembly in 1925 via the seat of Namoi, but defeated Lou Cunningham to win Gwydir for the Country Party at the federal elections of that year. He rose quickly through parliament and became Minister for Home Affairs in 1928, but was defeated at the 1929 elections.

Tamworth, New South Wales City in New South Wales, Australia

Tamworth is a city and the major regional centre in the New England region of northern New South Wales, Australia. Situated on the Peel River within the local government area of Tamworth Regional Council, about 318 km from the Queensland border, it is located almost midway between Brisbane and Sydney. According to the 2016 Census, the city had a population around 33,885

New South Wales Legislative Assembly one of the two chambers of the Parliament of New South Wales

The New South Wales Legislative Assembly is the lower of the two houses of the Parliament of New South Wales, an Australian state. The upper house is the New South Wales Legislative Council. Both the Assembly and Council sit at Parliament House in the state capital, Sydney. The Assembly is presided over by the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly.

The Namoi was an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales, created in 1880 and named after the Namoi River. It elected two members between 1891 and 1894. In 1894 it was abolished and partly replaced by Narrabri. In 1904, with the downsizing of the Legislative Assembly after Federation, Namoi was recreated, replacing Narrabri and part of Gunnedah. Between 1920 and 1927, it largely absorbed Gwydir and Tamworth and elected three members under proportional representation. In 1927, it was replaced by single-member electorates, mainly The Namoi, Tamworth and Barwon. Namoi was abolished in 1950.

Administrator of the Northern Territory

No longer a member of parliament, Abbott became secretary to the Primary Producers' Advisory Council, and it has been suggested that he was an organiser of the paramilitary Old Guard. He was returned as the member for Gwydir in 1931 and remained in parliament until 1937, when he was appointed administrator of the Northern Territory. Perceived as insensitive, arrogant and authoritarian, he was met with hostility by many Northern Territorians, especially in Darwin, although he had a good relationship with the pastoral industry. He was instrumental in removing Cecil Cook as chief protector of Aborigines in 1938 and, although he was on good terms with his Aboriginal staff, he was a paternalist who viewed Aborigines mostly as a resource.

Paramilitary Militarised force or other organization

A paramilitary is a semi-militarized force whose organizational structure, tactics, training, subculture, and (often) function are similar to those of a professional military, but is not formally part of a country's armed forces.

The Old Guard was an Australian anti-communist organisation which was founded in 1930 and was primarily active in New South Wales. Its exact origins are disputed, and at least one historian has claimed that it existed as early as 1917. It has been described as a paramilitary, quasi-official, vigilante, anti-communist organisation.

Darwin, Northern Territory City in the Northern Territory, Australia

Darwin is the capital city of the Northern Territory of Australia, situated on the Timor Sea. It is the largest city in the sparsely populated Northern Territory, with a population of 148,564. It is the smallest, wettest and most northerly of the Australian capital cities, and acts as the Top End's regional centre.

Abbott was almost killed in the Japanese bombing attack on Darwin in 1942, and was criticised for lack of leadership. The administration was evacuated to The Residency in Alice Springs and returned in 1945, although he was deposed the following year. In 1950 he published a book, Australia's Frontier Province, in which he surveyed the Northern Territory's development. He retired to Bowral and continued writing. He died on 30 April 1975 at Darlinghurst, and was given a state funeral. He was the last surviving member of Stanley Bruce's Cabinet.

The Residency, Alice Springs

The Residency holds significance for the people of Alice Springs as a tangible symbol of their brief legislative independence from the rest of the Northern Territory. It also provided a hub of social and cultural activities for the local residents.

Alice Springs Town in the Northern Territory, Australia

Alice Springs is the third-largest town in the Northern Territory of Australia. Popularly known as "the Alice" or simply "Alice", Alice Springs is situated roughly in Australia's geographic centre.

Northern Territory Federal territory of Australia

The Northern Territory is an Australian territory in the central and central northern regions of Australia. It shares borders with Western Australia to the west, South Australia to the south, and Queensland to the east. To the north, the territory looks out to the Timor Sea, the Arafura Sea and the Gulf of Carpentaria, including Western New Guinea and other Indonesian islands. The NT covers 1,349,129 square kilometres (520,902 sq mi), making it the third-largest Australian federal division, and the 11th-largest country subdivision in the world. It is sparsely populated, with a population of only 245,800, fewer than half as many people as Tasmania.

Related Research Articles

Parliaments of the Australian states and territories Subnational legislature in Australia 🇦🇺

The Parliaments of the Australian states and territories are legislative bodies within the federal framework of the Commonwealth of Australia.

Waterloo Creek massacre massacre of Australian Aboriginals

The Waterloo Creek massacre refers to a series of violent clashes between mounted police, civilian vigilantes and Indigenous Gamilaraay peoples, which occurred southwest of Moree, New South Wales, Australia, during December 1837 and January 1838. The events have been subject to much dispute, due to wildly conflicting accounts by various participants and in subsequent reports and historical analyses, about the nature and number of fatalities and the lawfulness of the actions. Interpretation of the events at Waterloo Creek was raised again during the controversial "history wars" which began in the 1990s in Australia.

Charles Abbott may refer to:

Grant Ernest John Tambling, AM is an Australian politician. He was a member of the House of Representatives from 1980 to 1983 and then a Senator for the Northern Territory from 1987 to 2001, representing the Country Liberal Party. He later served as Administrator of Norfolk Island from 2003 to 2007.

Bernard Francis Kilgariff AM was an Australian politician. He was one of the founders of the Country Liberal Party and served as a member of the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly which included a stint as Deputy Majority Leader before being elected to the Australian Senate.

Terence Aubrey Murray Australian politician

Sir Terence Aubrey Murray was an Australian pastoralist, parliamentarian and knight of the realm of Irish birth. He had the double distinction of being, at separate times, both the Speaker of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly and the President of the New South Wales Legislative Council. From 1837 to 1859 he owned the Yarralumla estate, which now serves as the official Canberra residence of the Governor-General of Australia.

Norman Ewing Australian politician and judge

Norman Kirkwood Ewing, Australian politician, was a member of three parliaments: the Western Australian Legislative Assembly, the Australian Senate, and the Tasmanian House of Assembly. He became a Judge of the Supreme Court of Tasmania, and was Administrator of Tasmania from November 1923 to June 1924.

The following is the Australian Table of Precedence.

  1. The Queen of Australia: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
  2. The Governor-General of Australia: His Excellency General The Honourable David Hurley
  3. Governors of states in order of appointment:
    1. Governor of Queensland His Excellency The Honourable Paul de Jersey
    2. Governor of South Australia His Excellency The Honourable Hieu Van Le
    3. Governor of Tasmania Her Excellency Professor The Honourable Kate Warner
    4. Governor of Victoria Her Excellency The Honourable Linda Dessau
    5. Governor of Western Australia His Excellency The Honourable Kim Beazley
    6. Governor of New South Wales Her Excellency The Honourable Margaret Beazley
  4. The Prime Minister The Honourable Scott Morrison MP
  5. The President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives in order of appointment:
    1. Speaker of the House of Representatives The Honourable Tony Smith
    2. President of the Senate Senator The Honourable Scott Ryan
  6. The Chief Justice of Australia The Honourable Susan Kiefel
  7. Senior diplomatic posts:
    1. Ambassadors and High Commissioners in order of date of presentation of the Letters of Credence or Commission
    2. Chargés d'affaires en pied or en titre in order of date of presentation of the Letters of Credence or Commission
    3. Chargés d'affaires and Acting High Commissioners in order of date of assumption of duties
  8. Members of the Federal Executive Council:
    1. Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport
    2. Treasurer
    3. Minister for Regional Services, Sport, Local Government and Decentralisation
    4. Minister for Finance and the Public Sector and Vice President of the Executive Council
    5. Minister for Indigenous Affairs
    6. Minister for Defence
    7. Minister for Defence Industry
    8. Minister for Foreign Affairs
    9. Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment
    10. Attorney-General
    11. Minister for Home Affairs
    12. Minister for Communications and Minister for the Arts
    13. Minister for Jobs and Industrial Relations and Minister for Women
    14. Minister for Small and Family Business, Skills and Vocational Education
    15. Minister for Resources and Northern Australia
    16. Minister for Industry, Science and Technology
    17. Minister for Education
    18. Minister for Health
    19. Minister for Families and Social Services
    20. Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources
    21. Minister for the Environment
    22. Minister for Energy
    23. Minister for Cities, Urban Infrastructure and Population
    24. Assistant Treasurer
    25. Special Minister of State
    26. Minister for Veterans' Affairs, Minister for Defence Personnel and Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Centenary of ANZAC
    27. Minister for Immigration, Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs
    28. Minister for Senior Australians and Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health
    29. Minister for Human Services and Digital Transformation
    30. Assistant Minister to the Prime Minister
    31. Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories
    32. Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister
    33. Assistant Minister for Roads and Transport
    34. Assistant Minister for Treasury and Finance
    35. Assistant Minister for Defence
    36. Assistant Minister for International Development and the Pacific
    37. Assistant Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment
    38. Assistant Minister for Home Affairs
    39. Assistant Minister for Social Services, Housing and Disability Services
    40. Assistant Minister for Children and Families
    41. Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources
  9. Administrators of Territories in order of appointment:
    1. Administrator of Norfolk Island
    2. Administrator of the Australian Indian Ocean Territories
    3. Administrator of the Northern Territory
  10. The Leader of the Opposition The Honourable Anthony Albanese MP
  11. Former holders of high offices:
    1. Former Governors-General in order of leaving office:
      1. Bill Hayden (1989–1996)
      2. Sir William Deane (1996–2001)
      3. Dr Peter Hollingworth (2001–2003)
      4. Major General Michael Jeffery (2003–2008)
      5. Dame Quentin Bryce (2008–2014)
    2. Former Prime Ministers in order of leaving office:
      1. Paul Keating (1991–1996)
      2. John Howard (1996–2007)
      3. Kevin Rudd
      4. Julia Gillard (2010–2013)
      5. Tony Abbott (2013–2015)
      6. Malcolm Turnbull (2015–2018)
    3. Former Chief Justices in order of leaving office:
      1. Sir Anthony Mason (1987–1995)
      2. Sir Gerard Brennan (1995–1998)
      3. Murray Gleeson (1998–2008)
      4. Robert French (2008–2017)
  12. Premiers of states in order of state populations, then the Chief Minister of the Northern Territory:
    1. Premier of New South Wales
    2. Premier of Victoria
    3. Premier of Queensland
    4. Premier of Western Australia
    5. Premier of South Australia
    6. Premier of Tasmania
    7. Chief Minister of the Northern Territory
  13. Justices of the High Court in order of appointment:
    1. Virginia Bell
    2. Stephen Gageler
    3. Patrick Keane
    4. Geoffrey Nettle
    5. Michelle Gordon
    6. James Edelman
  14. Senior judges:
    1. Chief Justice of the Federal Court of Australia
    2. President of the Fair Work Commission
  15. Chief Justices of States in order of appointment:
    1. Chief Justice of New South Wales
    2. Chief Justice of South Australia
    3. Chief Justice of Tasmania
    4. Chief Justice of Queensland
    5. Chief Justice of Victoria
    6. Chief Justice of Western Australia
  16. Australian members of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom in order of appointment:
    1. Doug Anthony
    2. Ian Sinclair
    3. Sir William Heseltine
  17. The Chief of the Defence Force
  18. Chief Judges of Federal and Territory Courts in order of appointment
    1. Chief Justice of the Australian Capital Territory
    2. Chief Justice of the Northern Territory
    3. Chief Justice of the Family Court of Australia
  19. Members of Parliament
  20. Judges of the Federal Court of Australia and Family Court of Australia, and Deputy presidents of the Fair Work Commission in order of appointment
  21. Lord Mayors of capital cities in order of city populations:
    1. Lord Mayor of Sydney
    2. Lord Mayor of Melbourne
    3. Lord Mayor of Brisbane
    4. Lord Mayor of Perth
    5. Lord Mayor of Adelaide
    6. Lord Mayor of Hobart
    7. Lord Mayor of Darwin
  22. Heads of religious communities according to the date of assuming office in Australia
  23. Presiding officers of State Legislatures in order of appointment, then Presiding Officer of the Northern Territory legislature:
    1. Speaker of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly
    2. President of the New South Wales Legislative Council
    3. Speaker of the Victorian Legislative Assembly
    4. Speaker of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly
    5. President of the Western Australian Legislative Council
    6. Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Queensland
    7. Speaker of the Tasmanian House of Assembly
    8. President of the South Australian Legislative Council
    9. Speaker of the South Australian House of Assembly
    10. President of the Victorian Legislative Council
    11. President of the Tasmanian Legislative Council
    12. Speaker of the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly
  24. Members of State Executive Councils in order of state populations, and then members of the Northern Territory Executive Council:
    1. Executive Council of New South Wales
    2. Executive Council of Victoria
    3. Executive Council of Queensland
    4. Executive Council of Western Australia
    5. Executive Council of South Australia
    6. Executive Council of Tasmania
    7. Executive Council of the Northern Territory
  25. Leaders of the Opposition of State Legislatures in order of state populations, then in the Northern Territory:
    1. Leader of the Opposition of New South Wales (acting)
    2. Leader of the Opposition of Victoria
    3. Leader of the Opposition of Queensland
    4. Leader of the Opposition of Western Australia
    5. Leader of the Opposition of South Australia
    6. Leader of the Opposition of Tasmania
    7. Leader of the Opposition of the Northern Territory
  26. Judges of State and Territory Supreme Courts in order of appointment:
    1. Supreme Court of New South Wales
    2. Supreme Court of Victoria
    3. Supreme Court of Queensland
    4. Supreme Court of Western Australia
    5. Supreme Court of South Australia
    6. Supreme Court of Tasmania
    7. Supreme Court of the Northern Territory
  27. Members of State Legislatures in order of state populations:
    1. New South Wales Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council
    2. Victorian Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council
    3. Queensland Legislative Assembly
    4. Western Australian Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council
    5. South Australian House of Assembly and Legislative Council
    6. Tasmanian House of Assembly and Legislative Council
    7. Northern Territory Legislative Assembly
  28. The Secretaries of Departments of the Australian Public Service and their peers and the Chiefs of the Air Force, Army, and Navy and Vice Chief of the Defence Force in order of first appointment to this group:
    1. Vice Chief of the Defence Force
    2. Chief of Navy
    3. Chief of Army
    4. Chief of Air Force
  29. Consuls-General, Consuls and Vice-Consuls according to the date on which recognition was granted
  30. Members of the Australian Capital Territory Legislative Assembly
  31. Recipients of Decorations or Honours from the Sovereign
  32. Citizens of the Commonwealth of Australia
States and territories of Australia first-level subdivision of Australia

Government in the Commonwealth of Australia is exercised on three levels: federal, states and territories, and local government.

Lou Cunningham Australian politician

Lucien Lawrence "Lou" Cunningham was an Australian farmer and politician.

A Political families of Australia is a family in which multiple members are involved in Australian politics, particularly electoral politics. Members may be related by blood or marriage; often several generations or multiple siblings may be involved.

Mac Abbott Australian politician

Macartney "Mac" Abbott was an Australian politician. Born in Murrurundi, New South Wales, he was educated at King's School, Parramatta. He became a farmer and grazier in the Upper Hunter area of New South Wales. He was the half brother of Joe Abbott, Member of the Australian House of Representatives (MP) for New England 1940–1949, and the cousin of Aubrey Abbott, MP for Gwydir 1925–1929 and 1931–1937. In 1913 he was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as the member for Upper Hunter, first as a Liberal and then from 1916 as a Nationalist. In 1918 he left the Assembly. In 1934 he was elected to the Australian Senate as a Country Party Senator for New South Wales. He was defeated in 1940. Abbott died in 1960.

Parliament of the Northern Territory

The Parliament of the Northern Territory is the unicameral legislature of the Northern Territory of Australia. It consists of the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly and the Administrator of the Northern Territory, who represents the Governor-General. It is one of three unicameral parliaments in Australia, along with those of Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory. The Legislative Assembly replaced the previous Legislative Council in 1974. It sits in Parliament House, Darwin.

Thomas Hassall Australian politician

Thomas Henry Hassall was an Anglo-Australian politician.

Robert Palmer Abbott was born in Ireland, and came to Sydney when a boy with his parents. He was admitted a solicitor in 1854. Abbott entered the New South Wales Legislative Assembly in 1872 as member for Tenterfield, and was returned for Hartley in 1880. He was nominated to the Legislative Council in 1885, and sat till 1 March 1888, when he resigned, owing to his objection to certain appointments. He was Secretary for Mines in the first Parkes Administration from 27 July 1874, to 8 February 1875, and a member of the New South Wales Commission in London for the Colonial and Indian Exhibition of 1886.

Thomas Gordon Gibbons Dangar was an Australian politician.

William Robert Campbell was an Australian politician.

Hilda Abbott (1890-1984) broadcaster, interior designer and community worker

Hilda Gertrude Abbott was the wife of the former Administrator of the Northern Territory, Charles Lydiard Aubrey Abbott. She is best known her contribution to the Northern Territory's Red Cross branch.

Sir William John Francis Kearney KBE is a retired Australian judge who served with distinction in Papua New Guinea and the Northern Territory.

Hubert Leonard Murray (1886-1963) public servant and colonial administrator

Hubert Leonard Murray was an Australian colonial administrator who served as Administrator of Papua between 1940 and 1942

References

<i>Australian Dictionary of Biography</i> biographical dictionary

The Australian Dictionary of Biography is a national co-operative enterprise founded and maintained by the Australian National University (ANU) to produce authoritative biographical articles on eminent people in Australia's history. Initially published in a series of twelve hard-copy volumes between 1966 and 2005, the dictionary has been published online since 2006.

Political offices
Preceded by
Neville Howse
Minister for Home and Territories
1928–1929
Succeeded by
Arthur Blakeley
Preceded by
Robert Weddell
Administrator of the Northern Territory
1937–1946
Succeeded by
Arthur Driver
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
Lou Cunningham
Member for Gwydir
1925–1929
Succeeded by
Lou Cunningham
Preceded by
Lou Cunningham
Member for Gwydir
1931–1937
Succeeded by
William Scully