BB&T Field

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BB&T Field
The Wrigley Field of College Football
BBT Field Deacon Tower Wake Forest University football stadium.jpg
The stadium during a Wake Forest vs. Ole Miss game, September 6, 2008
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BB&T Field
Location in North Carolina
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BB&T Field
Location in the United States
Former namesGroves Stadium (1968–2007)
Location411 Deacon Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC 27105
Coordinates 36°7′50″N80°15′17″W / 36.13056°N 80.25472°W / 36.13056; -80.25472 Coordinates: 36°7′50″N80°15′17″W / 36.13056°N 80.25472°W / 36.13056; -80.25472
Owner Wake Forest University
OperatorWake Forest University
Capacity 31,500
Record attendance37,623 (November 13, 2004)
Surface FieldTurf (2006–present)
Natural grass (1968–2006)
Construction
Broke groundJune 4, 1966 [1]
OpenedSeptember 14, 1968
Renovated1996, 2005-08, 2011
Construction cost $4 million
($28.8 million in 2018 dollars [2] )
ArchitectWalter Robbs Callahan & Pierce (renovations)
Tenants
Wake Forest Demon Deacons football (NCAA) (1968–present)

BB&T Field is a football stadium in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The stadium is just west of Gene Hooks Field at Wake Forest Baseball Park, home of the Wake Forest baseball team. It is primarily used for American football, and is the home field of the Wake Forest University Demon Deacons. The stadium opened in 1968 and holds 31,500 people. It is the smallest football stadium, by capacity, in both the ACC and in all Power 5 conferences. Previously known as Groves Stadium, in September 2007, Wake Forest University and BB&T, which is headquartered in Winston-Salem, announced a 10-year deal to officially rename the stadium "BB&T Field" starting with the first 2007 home game against Nebraska. [3] The deal is part of a larger development process to secure funds for stadium renovations and upgrades.

Contents

History

The former stadium name of Groves Field goes back to the original stadium at the original location of Wake Forest (Wake Forest, North Carolina). The old stadium was financed by Henry Groves, and when the school announced the move to Winston-Salem, he and his brother, Earl, decided to make a further contribution to the school to keep their name on any new stadium. After moving to Winston-Salem, many games were played in Bowman Gray Stadium while the project to build a new stadium met with many setbacks. It was not until 1966 that the final fundraising was done, and the stadium opened in September 1968, with the Deacons losing to old rival NC State. The former Groves Stadium became the home football field for Wake Forest High School and is today known as Trentini Stadium. [4] The stadium is part of a larger complex east of the main campus at the corner of Deacon Boulevard and University Parkway, which includes Gene Hooks Field at Wake Forest Baseball Park and Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum. The current stadium consists of two bowed grandstands on either side of the field. The southeast end zone is known as "Deacon Hill," and is used for berm seating during games. The Bridger Field House, originally built in 1968 with the stadium, was demolished in early 1996 and rebuilt during the 1996 football season. It opened midway through the 1997 football season. The structure is located behind the northwest end zone.

Wake Forest and Virginia Tech at Groves Stadium in 2006 2006 Virginia Tech at Wake Forest lined up.jpg
Wake Forest and Virginia Tech at Groves Stadium in 2006

Renovations

In 2006, the Wake Forest Athletics Department announced plans to further the renovations on BB&T Field (then Groves Stadium) with the construction of Deacon Tower which will house a new press box. Deacon Tower opened prior to the 2008 season. The press box is the centerpiece of the third of six levels of renovations set to take place at BB&T Field. The old press box, built in 1968, was successfully imploded & demolished on the morning of January 14, 2007 as numerous Demon Deacon fans watched on. Previous renovations included the bricking of the facade of the grandstand in 2005 and the implementation of FieldTurf in 2006. In 2011, a new scoreboard was added, replacing the spot of the previous, smaller scoreboard at the top of Deacon Hill. [5]

See also

Related Research Articles

Gene Hooks Field at Wake Forest Baseball Park

David F. Couch Ballpark is a collegiate and former minor-league baseball park in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA. The full-time home of the Wake Forest University baseball team, starting in 2009, it was also previously home of the Winston-Salem entry in the Carolina League, a role it played since the park opened in 1956.

Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum

The Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum is a 14,407-seat multi-purpose arena, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Construction on the arena began on April 23, 1987 and it opened on August 28, 1989. It was named after Lawrence Joel, an Army medic from Winston-Salem who was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1967 for action in Vietnam on November 8, 1965. The memorial was designed by James Ford in New York, and includes the poem "The Fallen" engraved on an interior wall. It is home to the Wake Forest University Demon Deacons men's basketball and women's basketball teams, and is adjacent to the Dixie Classic Fairgrounds. The arena replaced the old Winston-Salem Memorial Coliseum, which was torn down for the LJVM Coliseum's construction.

BB&T Stadium Multi-purpose stadium in Greensboro, North Carolina

BB&T Stadium, formerly Aggie Stadium, is a 21,500-seat multi-purpose stadium in Greensboro, North Carolina. W. Edward Jenkins, a North Carolina A&T State University alumnus and architect, designed the stadium. Opened in 1981, the stadium is the home of the North Carolina A&T State University Aggies football team and the Irwin Belk Olympic class track. In addition, BB&T Stadium features a "Fitness and Wellness Center". This 25,000 square feet (2,300 m2) fitness facility sits behind the scoreboard in the stadium's northeastern corner.

Gene Hooks Stadium was a baseball stadium in Winston-Salem, NC. It was the primary home field of the Wake Forest University Demon Deacons college baseball teams from 1981 through 2008.

W. Dennie Spry Soccer Stadium

W. Dennie Spry Soccer Stadium is a soccer-specific stadium located on the campus of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina where it is home to the Wake Forest Demon Deacons soccer teams.

Wake Forest Demon Deacons intercollegiate sports teams of Wake Forest University

The Wake Forest Demon Deacons are the various sports teams that represent Wake Forest University, located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. They compete at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

BB&T Ballpark (Winston-Salem, North Carolina)

BB&T Ballpark is a ballpark in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, that replaced Ernie Shore Field. It is primarily used for baseball, and is the home field of the Winston-Salem Dash minor league baseball team.

Winston-Salem Entertainment-Sports Complex

The Winston-Salem Entertainment-Sports Complex is a group of arenas, sports venues, and entertainment venues in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States. The complex consists of six structures, five of which are found in the same area along Deacon Boulevard in the city's North Ward. The complex is championed by the Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum and its own complex, which includes the LJVM Coliseum Annex and Education Building. The Dixie Classic Fairgrounds are intertwined with LJVM Complex. Across the road from the LJVM Coliseum lies BB&T Field, a football stadium, and Gene Hooks Field, a baseball stadium. Bowman Gray Stadium, a race track and football field, is considered part of the Winston-Salem Entertainment-Sports Complex, but it is not found in the vicinity of the other venues. It is found along Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard southeast of downtown. BB&T Ballpark is also part of the complex and is located in downtown at the intersection of Business 40 and North Carolina Highway 150.

Groves Stadium, currently known as Trentini Stadium, is a stadium in Wake Forest, North Carolina, United States. It hosted the Wake Forest University Demon Deacons football team until the school moved to Winston-Salem, North Carolina and Bowman Gray Stadium. Since then, the stadium has hosted the homes games of Wake Forest High School. The stadium held 20,000 people at its peak and was opened in 1940. It is currently named after former Wake Forest University player and coach of Wake Forest-Rolesville High School, Tony Trentini. Wake Forest University's current home stadium was also known as Groves Stadium until 2006.

2011 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 2011 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team represented Wake Forest University during the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Jim Grobe, who was coaching his eleventh season at the school, and played its home games at BB&T Field. Wake Forest competes in the Atlantic Coast Conference, as they have since the league's inception in 1953, and are in the Atlantic Division. They finished the season 6–7, 5–3 in ACC play to finish in a tie for second place in the Atlantic Division. They were invited to the Music City Bowl where they were defeated by Mississippi State 17–23.

2012 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 2012 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team represented Wake Forest University during the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Jim Grobe, who was coaching his twelfth season at the school, and played its home games at BB&T Field. Wake Forest competed in the Atlantic Coast Conference, as they have since the league's inception in 1953, and are in the Atlantic Division.

2013 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 2013 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team represented Wake Forest University during the 2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Jim Grobe, who coached his 13th season at the school, and played its home games at BB&T Field. Wake Forest competed in the Atlantic Coast Conference, as they have since the league's inception in 1953, and were in the Atlantic Division. They finished the season 4–8, 2–6 in ACC play to finish in sixth place in the Atlantic Division.

G. Eugene Hooks was the athletic director at Wake Forest University from 1964 to 1992.

2014 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 2014 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team represented Wake Forest University during the 2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Dave Clawson, who was coaching his first season at the school, and play its home games at BB&T Field. Wake Forest competed in the Atlantic Coast Conference as part of the Atlantic Division, as they have since the league's inception in 1953. They finished the season 3–9, 1–7 in ACC play to finish in a tie for sixth place in the Atlantic Division.

2015 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 2015 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team represented Wake Forest University during the 2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team is coached by Dave Clawson, who is coaching his second season at the school, and plays its home games at BB&T Field. Wake Forest competed in the Atlantic Coast Conference as part of the Atlantic Division, as they have since the league's inception in 1953. They finished the season 3–9, 1–7 in ACC play to finish in sixth place in the Atlantic Division.

Bowman Gray Stadium Asphalt flat oval short track and longstanding football stadium

Bowman Gray Stadium is a NASCAR sanctioned 14-mile (0.40 km) asphalt flat oval short track and longstanding football stadium located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. It is one of stock car racing's most legendary venues, and is referred to as "NASCAR's longest-running weekly race track". Bowman Gray Stadium is part of the Winston-Salem Sports and Entertainment Complex and is home of the Winston-Salem State University Rams football team. It was also the home of the Wake Forest University football team from 1956 until Groves Stadium opened in 1968. Bowman Gray Stadium was a popular venue for high school football in the 1970s and 1980s. Parkland and R.J. Reynolds High Schools shared Bowman Gray Stadium as their home field for high school football until the two schools built their own facility in 1994.

2016 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 2016 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team represented Wake Forest University during the 2016 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Dave Clawson, who was in his third season at the school, and played its home games at BB&T Field. Wake Forest competed in the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference, as they have since the league's inception in 1953. They finished the season 7–6, 3–5 in ACC play to finish in a tie for fourth place in the Atlantic Division. They were invited to the Military Bowl where they defeated Temple.

2017 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 2017 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team represented Wake Forest University during the 2017 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was led by fourth-year head coach Dave Clawson, and played their home games at BB&T Field. Wake Forest competed in the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference as they have since the league's inception in 1953. They finished the season 8–5, 4–4 in ACC play to finish in a three-way tie for third place in the Atlantic Division. They were invited to the Belk Bowl where they defeated Texas A&M.

2018 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 2018 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team represented Wake Forest University during the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was led by fifth-year head coach Dave Clawson, and played their home games at BB&T Field. Wake Forest competed in the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference as they have since the league's inception in 1953. They finished the season 7–6, 3–5 in ACC play to finish in a tie for fifth place in the Atlantic Division. They were invited to the Birmingham Bowl where they defeated Memphis.

References

  1. Grogan Rawls, Molly (June 4, 2014). "June 4,1966: Groves Stadium Groundbreaking". Winston-Salem Time Traveler. Retrieved September 11, 2018.
  2. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–" . Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  3. Daniels, Rob (September 6, 2007). "What's in a Name? $$$$". Greensboro News & Record . Archived from the original on September 30, 2007. Retrieved September 6, 2007.
  4. "Demon Deacons Facilities: BB&T Field". Wake Forest Sports. Archived from the original on December 5, 2007. Retrieved December 29, 2007.
  5. "Wake Forest Wake Forest University - WakeForestSports.com - The Official Site of Demon Deacon Athletics". www.wakeforestsports.com.