Baldwin DR-4-4-15

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Baldwin DR-4-4-15
Mopac-Babyfaces.jpg
Missouri Pacific Railroad (MP) Baldwin DR-4-4-15 "Babyface" units at Jefferson City, Missouri in 1953. MP and NYC units were constructed three feet longer than the earlier CNJ units, though the wheelbase of all units was the same. Despite some references stating the units had steam generators, there is no evidence of this. [1]
Type and origin
Power type Diesel-electric
Builder Baldwin Locomotive Works
ModelDR-4-4-15
Build dateNovember 1947 – June 1950
Total produced105
Specifications
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Prime mover 608SC
Engine type Four-stroke diesel
Performance figures
Power output1,500 hp (1.12 MW)
Career
NicknamesBabyface / Sharknose
Locale North America
DispositionAll scrapped

The Baldwin DR-4-4-15 was a 1,500-horsepower (1,100 kW) cab unit-type diesel locomotive built for freight service by the Baldwin Locomotive Works between November 1947 and June 1950. It was produced in two different body types, nicknamed the "Babyface" and " Sharknose " styles by railfans, though Baldwin used the same model number for both. 22 "Babyface" cab-equipped A units were built, along with 11 cabless booster B units; 36 "Sharknose" A units and 36 B units were constructed, making a total for all models of 105 locomotives built.

Cab unit diesel or electric locomotive where the bodywork is part of the structural integrity

A cab unit and a carbody unit are body styles of locomotives in North American railroad terminology. While closely related, they are not exactly the same. A carbody unit may be either a cabless booster unit controlled from a linked cab unit, or a cab unit that contains its own controls.

Diesel locomotive locomotive powered by a diesel engine

A diesel locomotive is a type of railway locomotive in which the prime mover is a diesel engine. Several types of diesel locomotive have been developed, differing mainly in the means by which mechanical power is conveyed to the driving wheels.

Baldwin Locomotive Works former locomotive manufacturer from the United States of America

The Baldwin Locomotive Works (BLW) was an American manufacturer of railroad locomotives from 1825 to 1956. Originally located in Philadelphia, it moved to nearby Eddystone, Pennsylvania, in the early 20th century. The company was for decades the world's largest producer of steam locomotives, but struggled to compete as demand switched to diesel locomotives. Baldwin produced the last of its 70,000-plus locomotives in 1956 and went out of business in 1972.

Contents

Original buyers

"Babyface" units produced (19471948)

RailroadQuantity
A units
Quantity
B units
Road numbers A unitsRoad numbers B unitsNotes
Central Railroad of New Jersey 10570–79K, L, M, R, S
Missouri Pacific Railroad 84201–208201B–204B
New York Central Railroad 423400–34033700–3701Renumbered 3800–3803 (A)
Totals2211

"Sharknose" units produced (19491950)

Pennsylvania Railroad DR-4-4-15 "Sharknose" units at Cincinnati, Ohio. Note the prominent side fuel fill, a signature feature. PRR DR-4-4-15 Sharknose.jpg
Pennsylvania Railroad DR-4-4-15 "Sharknose" units at Cincinnati, Ohio. Note the prominent side fuel fill, a signature feature.
RailroadQuantity
A units
Quantity
B units
Road numbers A unitsRoad numbers B unitsNotes
Baldwin Locomotive Works (demonstrators)226001A, 6001A16001B, 6001B1to Elgin, Joliet and Eastern Railroad #700A/#701A (A) #700B/#701B (B), then to Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 847, 849 (A) 847X, 849X (B), later 4200–4201 (A), 5200–5201 (B)
Pennsylvania Railroad 34349568A–9593A, 9700A–9707A9568B–9593B, 9700B–9707B9700A,B9707A,B were equipped with Baldwin RF-16 bodies, and are therefore referred to by some as "RF-15s."
Totals3636

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Baldwin VO-1000

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The Baldwin VO-660 was a diesel-electric locomotive switcher built by Baldwin Locomotive Works between April, 1939 and May, 1946. The 197,520–203,980 lb units were powered by a six-cylinder diesel engine rated at 660 horsepower, and rode on two-axle AAR Type-A switcher trucks in a B-B wheel arrangement. 142 examples of this model were built for American railroads, along with the United States Navy. Baldwin replaced the VO-660 with the model DS-4-4-660 in 1946.

FM H-15-44 model of American 1500ho diesel road switcher

The FM H-15-44 was a road-switcher manufactured by Fairbanks-Morse from September 1947 to June 1950. The locomotive was powered by a 1,500-horsepower (1,100 kW), eight-cylinder opposed piston engine as its prime mover, and was configured in a B-B wheel arrangement mounted atop a pair of two-axle AAR Type-B road trucks with all axles powered. The H-15-44 featured an offset cab design that provided space for an optional steam generator in the short hood, making the model versatile enough to work in passenger service as well as freight duty.

FM H-20-44 model of American 2000hp diesel locomotives

The FM H-20-44 was a multiple unit-capable end cab road switcher manufactured by Fairbanks-Morse from June 1947 – March 1954, and represented the company's first foray into the road switcher market. The 2,000 hp (1,490 kW), ten-cylinder opposed piston engine locomotive was referred to by F-M's engineering department as the "Heavy Duty" unit. It was configured in a B-B wheel arrangement mounted atop a pair of two-axle AAR Type-B road trucks with all axles powered. H-20-44s shared the same platform and much of the same carbody as the lighter-duty FM H-15-44, which began its production run three months later.

Baldwin Locomotive Works produced several different Baldwin DR-6 models of 6-axle passenger train-hauling diesel locomotives between 1945 and 1948. The series comprised eight individual versions, all of which sold only in small numbers; across all versions, only 39 locomotives were produced. Each version was produced only for a single railroad. Many shared the same Baldwin model number, DR-6-4-2000, even though they were rather different; this was because the Baldwin model only encoded the total axles (6), the driven axles (4) and the power output. The single exception was the single unit produced for the Chicago and North Western Railway, which had a single 1,000 hp (750 kW) engine and was model number DR-6-2-1000. In the AAR wheel arrangement scheme of classification, these locomotives were of A1A-A1A and A1A-3 arrangements, respectively.

Sharknose

Sharknose is a term applied by railfans to the styling of several cab unit diesel locomotives built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works to the specifications of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The styling was by the PRR's preferred designer, Raymond Loewy, with the distinctive nose reminiscent of his design for the PRR T1 steam locomotive.

Baldwin RF-16 model of American cab diesel-electric locomotives

The Baldwin RF-16 was a 1,600-horsepower (1,200 kW) cab unit-type diesel locomotive built for freight service by the Baldwin Locomotive Works between 1950 and 1953. All RF-16s were configured with a B-B wheel arrangement and ran on two AAR Type B two-axle road trucks, with all axles powered. A total of 109 cab-equipped A units were built, along with 51 cabless booster B units, for a total of 160 locomotives built. As was the case with most passenger locomotives of its day, the RF-16s came equipped with a retractable, nose-mounted drop coupler pilot. Unlike competing units from EMD and Alco, the RF-16 used an air-powered throttle, meaning that it could not be run in MU operation with EMD or Alco diesels without special MU equipment.

The RS1325 was a North American locomotive model built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division, having characteristics of both a switcher and a roadswitcher. Only two units were built.

The Baldwin RT-624 was a twin-engined diesel-electric locomotive, built by Baldwin Locomotive Works between 1951 and 1954.

References

  1. MOPAC Yahoo group, 29 September 2013 "MoPac Baldwin DR4-4-15's" thread [ unreliable source? ]
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