Balisword

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A balisword is an exceptionally large balisong. Similar to a normal balisong, two hilts cover the blade of a balisword. These handles fold away from the blade to expose it. The standard length of an open sword is around 37 inches (93.98 cm) long. A normal blade measures at around 17 inches (43.18 cm) long, with a set of folding hilts about 20 inches (50.49 cm) long.

The term "balisword" is a portmanteau of the words "balisong" and "sword". It describes the unique design of both the sword and the hilt(s). Baliswords can reach from traditional 2 feet, to over 6 feet in length. [1]

Unlike the normal balisong, the balisword is not generally used for performing tricks, known as "flipping", as the handles and blade maintain enough momentum to cause injury if they were to close on a hand. So users typically open a balisword with two hands rather than one.

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