Ballycarry

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Ballycarry
St John's church, Ballycarry - geograph.org.uk - 477037.jpg
St John's church, Ballycarry
United Kingdom Northern Ireland adm location map.svg
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Location within Northern Ireland
Population981 (2001 Census)
District
County
Country Northern Ireland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Postcode district BT
Dialling code 028
Police Northern Ireland
Fire Northern Ireland
Ambulance Northern Ireland
UK Parliament
NI Assembly
List of places
UK
Northern Ireland
Antrim
54°46′27″N5°45′10″W / 54.774158°N 5.752716°W / 54.774158; -5.752716 Coordinates: 54°46′27″N5°45′10″W / 54.774158°N 5.752716°W / 54.774158; -5.752716

Ballycarry (from Irish : Baile Caraidh, meaning 'town of the weir or rocky ford') [2] is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is midway between Larne and Carrickfergus, overlooking Islandmagee, and is part of the Mid and East Antrim Borough Council area. In the 2001 Census it had a population of 981.[ citation needed ]

Contents

Archaeology

Neolithic artefacts found in the village suggest ancient settlement, while the Lislaynan ecclesiastical settlement looks back to a thousand years of Christian witness. There was also a Norman settlement in the area, at Redhall, and at Brackenberg, now the centre of modern Ballycarry. An early Christian stone coffin lid which was uncovered at Redhall in the 18th century, was reinstated in the Templecorran cemetery and displays an early Christian cross engraved within an arc.

Community

The town is home to Ballycarry Presbyterian Church. Founded in 1613, Ballycarry is the oldest congregation in the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. The present church building dates from 1830. The Old Presbyterian (Non-Subscribing) Presbyterian Congregation also traces its roots back to 1613, and this congregation remained strongest in 1829 when the Presbyterian Church was split over the Subscription Controversy, the Non-Subscribers leaving open the issue of subscription to the Westminster Confession of Faith. The Old Presbyterian Church is located on the Main Street in the village. The most imposing church building is that of St. John's Parish Church, the Church of Ireland congregation, built in the 19th century by the Ker family of Redhall.

Ballycarry Community Association organises the Broadisland Gathering community festival held each year on the first Saturday in September and associated dates. The Gathering highlights the strong Ulster Scots heritage of the community and includes dancing, music, pipe bands, discussions, re-enactment, exhibitions and the Aul Kinntra Fair, revived from the 1930s but dating back to the 17th century. Chief guests at the Gathering have including Rt. Hon. Dr. John Reid, when Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

Ballycarry has a vibrant community association, which succeeded in attracting funding for a modern community centre in the village in 2001. The Association includes representatives from all local groups in the village including the three local churches, sports clubs, fraternities and social groups. In 2009 many events were held in Ballycarry to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the community being established in 1609.

Education

Transport

Ballycarry railway station was opened on 1 October 1862. [3] The railway station is located about a mile from the village.

2001 Census

Ballycarry is classified as a small village or hamlet by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) (i.e. with population between 500 and 1,000 people). On Census day (29 April 2001) there were 981 people living in Ballycarry. Of these:

Notable people

Related Research Articles

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James Orr, known as the Bard of Ballycarry, was a poet or rhyming weaver from Ballycarry, Co. Antrim in the province of Ulster in Ireland, who wrote in English and Ulster Scots. His most famous poem was The Irishman. He was the foremost of the Ulster Weaver Poets, and was writing contemporaneously with Robert Burns. According to that other great Ulster poet, John Hewitt, he produced some material that was better than Burns.

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References

  1. North-South Ministerial Council: 2005 Annual Report in Ulster Scots Archived 2011-12-22 at the Wayback Machine
  2. Place Names NI
  3. "Ballycarry" (PDF). Railscot - Irish Railways. Archived (PDF) from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 27 August 2007.
  4. Ballycarry - Co Antrim - Home of Poet James Orr http://www.weavers-trail.co.uk/poems-of-orr-passengers Archived 29 October 2013 at the Wayback Machine