Ballymoney

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Ballymoney
Ballymoney town hall.jpg
Ballymoney town hall
United Kingdom Northern Ireland adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Ballymoney
Location within Northern Ireland
Population10,402 (2011 Census)
  Belfast 48 mi (77 km)
District
County
Country Northern Ireland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town BALLYMONEY
Postcode district BT53
Dialling code 028
Police Northern Ireland
Fire Northern Ireland
Ambulance Northern Ireland
EU Parliament Northern Ireland
UK Parliament
NI Assembly
Website www.ballymoney.gov.uk
List of places
UK
Northern Ireland
Antrim
55°04′16″N6°30′29″W / 55.071°N 6.508°W / 55.071; -6.508 Coordinates: 55°04′16″N6°30′29″W / 55.071°N 6.508°W / 55.071; -6.508

Ballymoney (from Irish : Baile Monaidh, meaning "homestead on the peatland" [ˈbˠaːlˠaːˈmˠɔnˠɪ] ) [2] is a small town and civil parish in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is currently served by the Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council. The civil parish of Ballymoney is situated in the historic baronies of Dunluce Upper and Kilconway in County Antrim, and the barony of North East Liberties of Coleraine in County Londonderry. [3] It had a population of 10,393 people in the 2011 Census. [4]

Irish language Goidelic language spoken in Ireland and by Irish people

Irish is a Goidelic language of the Celtic and Indo-European language family, originating in Ireland and historically spoken by the Irish people. Irish is spoken as a first language in substantial areas of counties Galway, Kerry, Cork and Donegal, smaller areas of Waterford, Mayo and Meath, and a few other locations, and as a second language by a larger group of non-habitual speakers across the country. A speaker of the Irish language is known as a Gaeilgeoir.

Civil parishes in Ireland administrative division of Ireland

Civil parishes are units of territory in the island of Ireland that have their origins in old Gaelic territorial divisions. They were adopted by the Anglo-Norman Lordship of Ireland and then by the Elizabethan Kingdom of Ireland, and were formalised as land divisions at the time of the Plantations of Ireland. They no longer correspond to the boundaries of Roman Catholic or Church of Ireland parishes, which are generally larger. Their use as administrative units was gradually replaced by Poor Law Divisions in the 19th century, although they were not formally abolished. Today they are still sometimes used for legal purposes.

County Antrim Place in Antrim, Northern Ireland

County Antrim is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the north-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 3,046 square kilometres (1,176 sq mi) and has a population of about 618,000. County Antrim has a population density of 203 people per square kilometre or 526 people per square mile. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, as well as part of the historic province of Ulster.

Contents

Ballymoney has expanded in recent years and a lot of new houses have been built. This is primarily as a result of high house prices in the Coleraine/Portstewart/Portrush 'Triangle' areas shifting first-time buyers to the less expensive Ballymoney area. Ballymoney is located on the main road between Coleraine and Ballymena, with good road and rail connections to the main cities in Northern Ireland, Belfast and Derry.

Coleraine town and civil parish in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland

Coleraine is a large town and civil parish near the mouth of the River Bann in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. It is 55 miles (88.5 km) northwest of Belfast and 30 miles (48.3 km) east of Derry, both of which are linked by major roads and railway connections. It is part of Causeway Coast and Glens district.

Portstewart small town in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland

Portstewart is a small town in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. It had a population of 8,029 people in the 2011 Census. It is a seaside resort neighbouring Portrush. Its harbour and scenic coastal paths form an Atlantic promenade leading to 2 miles of golden strand. Portstewart is probably best known for this sandy beach, popular with surfers.

Portrush seaside resort town in Northern Ireland

Portrush is a small seaside resort town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, on the County Londonderry border. The main part of the old town, including the railway station as well as most hotels, restaurants and bars, is built on a mile–long peninsula, Ramore Head, pointing north-northwest. It had a population of 6,454 people as measured in 2011. In the off-season, Portrush is a dormitory town for the nearby campus of the University of Ulster at Coleraine. It neighbours the resort of Portstewart.

The Ballymoney area has the highest life expectancy of any area in Northern Ireland, with the average male life expectancy at birth being 79.9 years and 84.8 years for females in years between 2010 and 2012. [5] Conversely, it was revealed in 2013 that Ballymoney residents are more likely to die from heart disease than anywhere else in Northern Ireland. [6]

Life expectancy Statistical measure of how long a person or organism may live, based on factors of their life

Life expectancy is a statistical measure of the average time an organism is expected to live, based on the year of its birth, its current age and other demographic factors including gender. The most commonly used measure of life expectancy is at birth (LEB), which can be defined in two ways. Cohort LEB is the mean length of life of an actual birth cohort and can be computed only for cohorts born many decades ago, so that all their members have died. Period LEB is the mean length of life of a hypothetical cohort assumed to be exposed, from birth through death, to the mortality rates observed at a given year.

The town hosts the Ballymoney Drama Festival, the oldest drama festival in Ireland, which was founded in 1933. The town also hosts the Ballymoney Show, which is one of the oldest agricultural shows in Northern Ireland and was founded in 1902. [7]

History

The Troubles

For more information see The Troubles in Ballymoney, which includes a list of incidents in Ballymoney during the Troubles resulting in two or more fatalities.

The Northern Irish Troubles resulted in 14 deaths in or near the County Antrim town of Ballymoney; the sole incident involving two or more fatalities was the Quinn brothers' killings in July 1998. The three Catholic brothers, aged 9, 10 and 11, were killed during a sectarian Ulster Volunteer Force petrol bomb attack on their home at Carnany Park, in a predominantly Protestant area of Ballymoney. The family had only moved into the house the previous week. The mother and her partner escaped, but couldn't save the three children.

Politics

Ballymoney district is part of the Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council. In 2014, the residents elected 3 Democratic Unionist Party, 2 Ulster Unionist Party, 1 Traditional Unionist Voice and 1 Sinn Féin councillors.

Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council

Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council is a local authority in Northern Ireland that was established on 1 April 2015. It covers most of the northern coast of Northern Ireland and replaced Ballymoney Borough Council, Coleraine Borough Council, Limavady Borough Council and Moyle District Council. The first elections to the authority were on 22 May 2014 and it acted as a shadow authority, prior to the creation of the Causeway Coast and Glens district on 1 April 2015.

Democratic Unionist Party Political unionist party of Northern Ireland

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) is a unionist political party in Northern Ireland favoring British identity. It was founded in 1971 during the Troubles by Ian Paisley, who led the party for the next 37 years. Now led by Arlene Foster, it is equal with Sinn Féin in having the most seats in the Northern Ireland Assembly, and it is the sixth-largest party in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom. Following the 2017 general election, the party agreed to support a Conservative minority government on a case-by-case basis on matters of mutual concern.

Ulster Unionist Party Political party in Northern Ireland

The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) is a unionist political party in Northern Ireland. Having gathered support in Northern Ireland during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, the party governed Northern Ireland between 1921 and 1972. It was supported by most unionist voters throughout the conflict known as the Troubles, during which time it was often referred to as the Official Unionist Party (OUP). Between 1905 and 1972 its MPs took the Conservative whip at Westminster, considered as part of the Conservative Party.

Demography

Prior to the 2011 census Ballymoney was classified as a small town (i.e. with population between 4,500 and 10,000 people) by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA). However since 2011 it can now be classified as a medium town (i.e. with a population between 10,000 and 18,000 people). [8] :11

2011 Census

On Census day (27 March 2011) there were 10,402 people living in Ballymoney (4,354 households), accounting for 0.57% of the NI total. [9] Of these:

2001 Census

On Census day (29 April 2001) there were 9,021 people living in Ballymoney. Of these:

For more details see: Northern Ireland Neighbourhood Information Service [10]

Buildings of note

Ballymoney town clock. Ballymoney Town Clock and masonic Hall.jpg
Ballymoney town clock.

Ballymoney is one of the oldest towns in Ireland with many buildings of historic note in the town centre. [11]

People

Arts and Media

Politics

Sports

Education

Nursery Schools

Primary schools

Ballymoney Primary School, also known as Ballymoney Model, is situated at the top of the North Road and holds approximately 360 pupils each year. The school is within the Northern Eastern Education Library Board area.
The school is one of the largest within Ballymoney, housing eleven classrooms running from P1 to P7. It also has a large dinner hall, assembly hall, and a computer room. The school has a library and a classroom for special needs children.
Historically, Ballymoney Primary has been a predominately protestant school, but was scheduled to be integrated in September 2009 following a very narrow vote in favour of the idea.
Ballymoney Primary's principal is Mr. G. McVeigh, while the vice principal is Mrs. Herron. And a new 2013 principal Mrs. Jamison

Garryduff primary school is for pupils aged 4–11, it is located on the Garryduff road approximately 3 miles out of Ballymoney it has got a new extension with a new multi-purpose hall and a new classroom. The current principal is Miss Tannahill.

Landhead Primary School is a primary school for pupils aged 5 to 11 years, located on the Kilraughts Road, close to Ballymoney Rugby Club.
In 2004 the Sunday Mirror reported on the school's cat "Tigger". The cat has since featured on local news and radio programmes. [13]

Leaney Primary School is located near Ballymoney High School, on Intermediate Road, approximately 1 mile from the town centre. The school for children aged 4 to 11, is a part of the Eco-Schools programme which aims to raise pupils awareness of sustainable development issues. The current principal is Miss V Moorhouse.

Lislagan Primary School is located about three miles from Ballymoney, in a rural location. It is a controlled school for girls and boys aged from 3 to 11. Enrollment has risen steadily over the last five years and currently stands at 94. [14] It is within the North Eastern Education and Library Board area.

Most prestigious primary school in the town with great facilities.

Secondary schools

College

Sport

Transport

Industry

Media

The Ballymoney Chronicle was established in 1844. It is the largest selling weekly newspaper in the North Coast and the second largest weekly newspaper in Northern Ireland. [17]

Town twinning

See also

Related Research Articles

County Londonderry Place in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

County Londonderry, also known as County Derry, is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland. Prior to the partition of Ireland, it was one of the counties of the Kingdom of Ireland from 1613 onward and then of the United Kingdom after the Acts of Union 1800. Adjoining the north-west shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 2,074 km² and today has a population of about 247,132.

Limavady market town in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland

Limavady is a market town in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, with Binevenagh as a backdrop. Lying 17 miles (27 km) east of Derry and 14 miles (23 km) southwest of Coleraine, Limavady had a population of 12,043 people as of the 2001 Census—an increase of some 17% since 1991. In the 30 years between 1971 and 2011, Limavady's population nearly doubled. Limavady is within Causeway Coast and Glens Borough.

Ballyclare town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland

Ballyclare is a small town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It had a population of 18,441, including the surrounding townland, as of 2016. The town itself has a population of 9,919, according to the 2011 census. Under the reorganisation of Northern Ireland local government in 1973, Ballyclare lost its urban district status and became part of Newtownabbey borough. It is now part of Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council

Bushmills village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland

Bushmills is a village on the north coast of County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Bushmills had 1,319 inhabitants in the 2001 Census. It is located 60 miles (97 km) from Belfast, 11 miles (18 km) from Ballycastle and 9 miles (14 km) from Coleraine. The village owes its name to the River Bush and to a large watermill that was built there in the early 17th century.

Ballymoney (borough) administrative territorial entity of the United Kingdom

Ballymoney was a local government district with borough status in Northern Ireland. It was headquartered in Ballymoney. Other towns in the borough included Dervock, Dunloy, Cloughmills and Rasharkin. The borough had a population of 31,224 according to the 2011 census.

Moyle District Council administrative territorial entity of the United Kingdom

Moyle District Council was a local council in County Antrim in the northeast of Northern Ireland. It merged with Ballymoney Borough Council, Coleraine Borough Council and Limavady Borough Council in May 2015 under local government reorganisation to become Causeway Coast and Glens District Council.

Newtownabbey suburb of Belfast, Northern Ireland

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Coleraine Borough Council administrative territorial entity of the United Kingdom

Coleraine Borough Council was a local council mainly in County Londonderry and partly in County Antrim in Northern Ireland. It merged with Ballymoney Borough Council, Limavady Borough Council and Moyle District Council in May 2015 under local government reorganisation in Northern Ireland to become Causeway Coast and Glens District Council

Limavady Borough Council administrative territorial entity of the United Kingdom

Limavady Borough Council was a local government body in Northern Ireland. In May 2015 it merged with Coleraine Borough Council, Ballymoney Borough Council and Moyle District Council under local government reorganisation in Northern Ireland to become Causeway Coast and Glens District Council.

Ballynure village and civil parish

Ballynure is a village and civil parish near Ballyclare in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is part of Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council and had a population of 677 people in the 2001 Census.

Dunloy village in the United Kingdom

Dunloy is a village and townland in the Borough of Ballymoney, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is located 11 miles (18 km) north of Ballymena and 6 miles (10 km) north-west is Ballymoney. It is located in the civil parish of Finvoy, in the former barony of Kilconway. It had a population of 1,215 people in the 2011 Census.

Ballyrobert is a small village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is about 4 km south of Ballyclare and has developed around the junction of the Ballyrobert Road and the Mossley Road/The Longshot. It had a population of 587 people in the 2001 Census. It is within the Newtownabbey Borough Council area.

Balnamore is a small village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is within the townland of Ballynacree-Skein and lies 3 km west of Ballymoney. It is part Causeway Coast and Glens District Council. Historically it was known as Balinamore.

Cloughmills village in the United Kingdom

Cloughmills or Cloghmills is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Ballymoney is 15 km to the north-west and Ballymena is 16 km to the south. It had a population of 1,309 people in the 2011 Census. It is in Causeway Coast and Glens District Council.

Dervock village in the United Kingdom

Dervock is a small village and townland in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is about 3.5 miles (6 km) northeast of Ballymoney, on the banks of the Dervock River. It is situated in the civil parish of Derrykeighan and the historic barony of Dunluce Lower. It had a population of 714 people in the 2011 Census.

Kilrea village in Northern Ireland

Kilrea is a village, townland and civil parish in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. It gets its name from the ancient church that was located near to where the current Church of Ireland is located on Church Street looking over the town. It is near the River Bann, which marks the boundary between County Londonderry and County Antrim. In the 2011 Census it had a population of 2,724 people. It is situated within Causeway Coast and Glens district.

Bendooragh is a small village and townland in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, 2 12 miles (4.0 km) south west of Ballymoney. It is part of Causeway Coast and Glens District Council. It had a population of 622 people in the 2011 Census.

References

  1. Know_as=Peters_Back_yard Bellymoney daes Burns proud – Ullans Speakers Association
  2. Placenames Database of Ireland
  3. "Ballymoney". IreAtlas Townlands Database. Retrieved 20 April 2015.
  4. "Ballymoney". Census 2011 Results. NI Statistics and Research Agency. Archived from the original on 22 April 2015. Retrieved 30 April 2015.
  5. Chartered Society of Physiotherapists (Microsoft Excel spreadsheet file). Archived 12 March 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  6. "Ballymoney 'worst place in NI' for heart disease" BBC News
  7. "Ballymoney Show". Ballymoney Show. Retrieved 10 November 2015.
  8. "Statistical Classification and Delineation of Settlements" (PDF). NI Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA). February 2005. Table 3 / Band C - Large Town. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  9. "Census 2011 Population Statistics for Coleraine Settlement". Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA). 2011. Retrieved 5 June 2018.
  10. Northern Ireland Neighbourhood Information Service website.
  11. "Work ethic brings long life in Co Antrim's Tír na nÓg", Irish News, 13 August 2008
  12. "Peter Chambers". www.worldrowing.com. International Rowing Federation . Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  13. Sunday Mirror
  14. School Inspection Report, January 2006 Archived 29 September 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  15. "Ballymoney" (PDF). Railscot – Irish Railways. Archived (PDF) from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 27 August 2007.
  16. Baker, Michael HC (1999). Irish Narrow Gauge Railways. A View from the Past. Ian Allan Publishing. ISBN   0-7110-2680-7.
  17. "Ballymoney Chronicle" . Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  18. Douglas Borough Council Archived 14 July 2009 at the Wayback Machine