Ballynure

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Ballynure
village and civil parish
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Coordinates: 54°46′N5°57′W / 54.767°N 5.950°W / 54.767; -5.950 Coordinates: 54°46′N5°57′W / 54.767°N 5.950°W / 54.767; -5.950
Christ Church, Ballynure Christ Church, Ballynure - geograph.org.uk - 403088.jpg
Christ Church, Ballynure

Ballynure (from Irish Baile an Iúir 'homestead of the yews ') [1] is a village and civil parish near Ballyclare in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is part of Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council and had a population of 677 people in the 2001 Census.

Contents

The village was for decades effectively split in two by the A8 main road, which runs from Belfast to Larne. This situation was alleviated in 2015, with the opening of a bypass to the northwest of the village. A stream called the Ballynure Water runs through it and the houses are a mixture of old fashioned buildings and new estates. Christ Church, Church of Ireland is one of the old buildings of note in Ballynure.

Transport

Sport

Ballynure Old Boys F.C. plays association football in the Ballymena & Provincial League.

2002 Census

Ballynure is classified as a massive village or hamlet by the NI Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) (i.e. with a population between 500 and 10,000 people). On Census day (29 April 2002) there were 677 people living in Ballynure. Of these:

Places of interest

The Ballynure Elementary School for Primary Education (often known simply as Ballynure Primary School) is only school in the village and surrounding areas until Ballyclare. It is also one of six schools in Northern Ireland classed as "Elementary Schools". The School was founded in 1930.

The Ballynure Cemetery is the oldest cemetery in all Newtownabbey and second oldest in all Antrim.

Additional information

Jonathan Swift, the writer of Gulliver's Travels, was responsible for the Ballynure parish of the Church of Ireland, during his time as prebend of Kilroot.

The Clements family, who lived at Clements Hill outside the village, were the ancestors of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as Mark Twain. Twain, who was author of works including The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, was described by William Faulkner as 'the father of American literature.' His grandfather Samuel Clemens emigrated to America and Twain was born in Florida, Missouri, in November 1835. One of his ancestors, Henry Clements, was Mayor of Carrickfergus in 1696 and another is said to have fought for William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne six years earlier.

In 2007 Ballynure started a fair, which is now known as the "Yearly Ballynure fair". Along with the May Fair in Ballyclare, this fair is one of the very few yearly fairs in the U.K. where animals can be bought, although unlike the May Fair (which sells horses) the Ballynure Fair has only been known to sell cows.

In 2017 the village set up 'Ballynature Day' which is currently the largest nature convention in Northern Ireland

Notable people

See also

Related Research Articles

County Antrim Place in Antrim Northern Ireland

County Antrim is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the north-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 3,046 square kilometres (1,176 sq mi) and has a population of about 618,000. County Antrim has a population density of 203 people per square kilometre or 526 people per square mile. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, as well as part of the historic province of Ulster.

Glengormley Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Glengormley is the name of a townland and electoral ward in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Glengormley is within the urban area of Newtownabbey and the Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council area. It is also situated in the civil parish of Carnmoney and the historic barony of Belfast Lower.

Larne Town (and civil parish) in County Antrim, Northern Ireland

Larne is a seaport and industrial market town, as well as a civil parish, on the east coast of County Antrim, Northern Ireland, with a population of 18,755 people at the 2011 Census. The Larne Local Government District had a population of 32,180 in 2011. It has been used as a seaport for over 1,000 years, and is today a major passenger and freight roll-on roll-off port. Larne is administered by Mid and East Antrim Borough Council. Together with parts of the neighbouring districts of Antrim and Newtownabbey and Causeway Coast and Glens, it forms the East Antrim constituency for elections to the Westminster Parliament and Northern Ireland Assembly. The civil parish is situated in the historic barony of Glenarm Upper.

Ballyclare Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Ballyclare is a small town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It had a population of 9,953 according to the 2011 census. It is located within the Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council area.

Newtownabbey Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Newtownabbey is a large settlement north of Belfast in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Sometimes considered to be a suburb of Belfast, it is separated from the rest of the city by Cavehill and Fortwilliam golf course. At the 2011 Census, Metropolitan Newtownabbey Settlement had a population of 65,646, making it the third largest settlement in Northern Ireland. It is part of Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council.

Templepatrick Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Templepatrick is a village and civil parish in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is 9.2 miles (14.8 km) northwest of Belfast, and halfway between the towns of Ballyclare and Antrim. It is also close to Belfast International Airport and the village has several hotels. Templepatrick is the site of historic Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and the Old Presbyterian Church. It had a population of 1,437 people in the 2011 Census.

Doagh Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Doagh is a village and townland in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is in the Six Mile Water Valley, about two miles south-west of Ballyclare, and had a population of 1,130 people in the 2001 Census. It is known as Doach in Scots.

Cullybackey

Cullybackey or Cullybacky is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It lies 3 miles north-west of Ballymena, on the banks of the River Main, and is part of Mid and East Antrim district. It is a predominantly Protestant area. It had a population of 2,569 people in the 2011 Census.

Glynn village and civil parish

Glynn is a small village and civil parish in the Mid and East Antrim Borough Council area of County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It lies a short distance south of Larne, on the shore of Larne Lough. Glynn had a population of 2,027 people in the 2011 Census.

Whiteabbey townland in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Whiteabbey is a townland in Newtownabbey, north of Belfast in County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

Ballyrobert is a small village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is about 4 km south of Ballyclare and has developed around the junction of the Ballyrobert Road and the Mossley Road/The Longshot. It had a population of 587 people in the 2001 Census. It is within the Newtownabbey Borough Council area.

Carnlough Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Carnlough is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It has a picturesque harbour on the shores of Carnlough Bay. Carnlough is on the Coast Road beside the North Channel and at the foot of Glencloy, the second of the nine Glens of Antrim. It is situated in Mid and East Antrim district, as well the historic barony of Glenarm Lower, and the civil parishes of Ardclinis and Tickmacrevan. It had a population of 2,084 people in 2016.

Cogry village

Cogry-Kilbride is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, about 4 km west of Ballyclare. The village encompasses the two townlands of Cogry and Kilbride. It had a population of 1,195 people in the 2001 census. Kilbride is also a civil parish. It is situated in Antrim and Newtownabbey district.

Ballyeaston

Ballyeaston, formerly spelt Ballyistin, is a small village and townland in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is 2–3 km north of Ballyclare, on the road to Larne. It lies on the southern hill slopes overlooking Six Mile Water. In the 2001 Census it had a population of 90 people. It is within the Antrim & Newtownabbey Borough Council area.

Straid

Straid is a small village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, about three miles east of Ballyclare, and about six miles inland from Carrickfergus. It lies at the centre of the townland of Straidlands, in the Civil Parish of Ballynure within the Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council area, and in the former barony of Belfast Lower. The village has a congregational church, an Orange hall, and a primary school.

Ballymena and Larne Railway

The Ballymena and Larne Railway was a 3 ft narrow gauge railway in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The first part opened in July 1877 and regular passenger services began in August 1878, the first on the Irish 3 ft gauge railways. Passenger services ended in 1933 and the last part of the railway closed in 1950.

Belfast Lower Place in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Belfast Lower is a barony in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. To its east lies the east-Antrim coast and Belfast Lough, and it is bordered by four other baronies: Belfast Upper to the south, Carrickfergus to the east, Antrim Upper to the west; Glenarm Upper to the north. The Forth and Milewater rivers both flow through Belfast Lower, with Larne harbour also situated in the barony.

Ballyclare Junction railway station

Ballyclare Junction railway station was on the Belfast and Ballymena Railway which ran from Belfast to Ballymena in Northern Ireland. Despite the name, the physical junction for the branch line to Ballyclare was located a short distance along the line in the Antrim direction, at Kingsbog Junction.

References

  1. Placenames Database of Ireland
  2. "Ballynure station" (PDF). Railscot - Irish Railways. Archived (PDF) from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 11 September 2007.