Barnard Hughes

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Barnard Hughes
Barnard hughes doc 1975.JPG
Hughes as Dr. Joe Bogert on Doc , 1975.
Born
Bernard Aloysius Kiernan Hughes

(1915-07-16)July 16, 1915
DiedJuly 11, 2006(2006-07-11) (aged 90)
OccupationActor
Years active1939–2000
Spouse(s)
Helen Stenborg (m. 1950)
Children2
With cast of Doc. Standing, L-R: Irwin Corey and Mary Wickes. Seated: Elizabeth Wilson and Barnard Hughes (1975) Doc cast 1975.JPG
With cast of Doc . Standing, L-R: Irwin Corey and Mary Wickes. Seated: Elizabeth Wilson and Barnard Hughes (1975)

Bernard Aloysius Kiernan "Barnard" Hughes (July 16, 1915 – July 11, 2006) was an American actor of television, theater and film. Hughes became famous for a variety of roles; his most-notable roles came after middle age, and he was often cast as a dithering authority figure or grandfatherly elder.

Actor person who acts in a dramatic or comic production and works in film, television, theatre, or radio

An actor is a person who portrays a character in a performance. The actor performs "in the flesh" in the traditional medium of the theatre or in modern media such as film, radio, and television. The analogous Greek term is ὑποκριτής (hupokritḗs), literally "one who answers". The actor's interpretation of their role—the art of acting—pertains to the role played, whether based on a real person or fictional character. Interpretation occurs even when the actor is "playing themselves", as in some forms of experimental performance art.

Theatre in the United States is part of the European theatrical tradition that dates back to ancient Greek theatre and is heavily influenced by the British theatre. The central hub of the US theater scene is New York City, with its divisions of Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Off-Off-Broadway. Many movie and television stars got their big break working in New York productions. Outside New York, many cities have professional regional or resident theater companies that produce their own seasons, with some works being produced regionally with hopes of eventually moving to New York. US theater also has an active community theatre culture, which relies mainly on local volunteers who may not be actively pursuing a theatrical career.

Cinema of the United States Filmmaking in the USA

The cinema of the United States, often metonymously referred to as Hollywood, has had a large effect on the film industry in general since the early 20th century. The dominant style of American cinema is classical Hollywood cinema, which developed from 1917 to 1960 and characterizes most films made there to this day. While Frenchmen Auguste and Louis Lumière are generally credited with the birth of modern cinema, American cinema soon came to be a dominant force in the industry as it emerged. It produces the total largest number of films of any single-language national cinema, with more than 700 English-language films released on average every year. While the national cinemas of the United Kingdom (299), Canada (206), Australia, and New Zealand also produce films in the same language, they are not considered part of the Hollywood system. Hollywood has also been considered a transnational cinema. Classical Hollywood produced multiple language versions of some titles, often in Spanish or French. Contemporary Hollywood offshores production to Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

Contents

Personal life

Hughes was born in Bedford Hills, New York, the son of Irish immigrants Marcella "Madge" (née Kiernan) and Owen Hughes. [1] [2] He attended La Salle Academy and Manhattan College in New York City. Hughes served in the United States Army during World War II. Hughes was married to actress Helen Stenborg. They married on April 19, 1950, and remained married until his death. Hughes was five days shy of his 91st birthday when he died. The Hugheses had two children, the theatre director Doug Hughes, and a daughter, Laura. Hughes and his wife are interred at Church of the Transfiguration, Episcopal (Manhattan) in New York City.

Bedford Hills, New York Hamlet & CDP in New York, United States

Bedford Hills is a hamlet in the Town of Bedford, Westchester County, New York, United States. The population was 3,001 at the 2010 census, which lists the community as a census-designated place. The Bedford Hills Correctional Facility for Women is located in the hamlet.

La Salle Academy is a private, all boys high school in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

Manhattan College

Manhattan College is a private, Roman Catholic, liberal arts college in the Bronx in New York City. After originally being established in 1853 by the Brothers of the Christian Schools as an academy for day students, Manhattan College was officially incorporated as an institution of higher education through a charter granted by the New York State Board of Regents. In 1922, the College moved from Manhattan to the Riverdale section of the Bronx, roughly 6.4 miles (10.3 km) north of its original location on 131st Street in the Manhattanville section of Manhattan. Manhattan College offers undergraduate programs in the arts, business, education, health, engineering, and science. Graduate programs are offered for education, business, and engineering.

Career

Hughes changed the "e" in his first name to an "a" to help his acting career on the advice of a numerologist. Through high school and college, Hughes worked a series of odd jobs, including a stint as a dockworker and as a salesman at Macy's. He auditioned for the Shakespeare Fellowship Repertory company in New York City on the advice of a friend, and ended up joining the company for two years.

Hughes played more than 400 theatre roles, including the one for which he was perhaps most famous, in Hugh Leonard's Da . He won Broadway's 1978 Tony Award as Best Actor for his portrayal of the title role; in 1988 he recreated the role for the film Da .

Hugh Leonard Irish writer

Hugh Leonard was an Irish dramatist, television writer and essayist. In a career that spanned 50 years, Leonard wrote nearly 30 full-length plays, 10 one-act plays, three volumes of essays, two autobiographies, three novels and numerous screenplays and teleplays, as well as writing a regular newspaper column.

Da is a 1978 comedy play by Irish playwright Hugh Leonard.

Tony Award awards for live Broadway theatre

The Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Broadway Theatre, more commonly known as the Tony Award, recognizes excellence in live Broadway theatre. The awards are presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League at an annual ceremony in Manhattan. The awards are given for Broadway productions and performances, and an award is given for regional theatre. Several discretionary non-competitive awards are also given, including a Special Tony Award, the Tony Honors for Excellence in Theatre, and the Isabelle Stevenson Award. The awards are named after Antoinette "Tony" Perry, co-founder of the American Theatre Wing.

On screen, he appeared in the film transcription of Hamlet (1964), and also appeared in such films as Midnight Cowboy (1969), Where's Poppa? (1970), Cold Turkey (1971) The Hospital (1971), Tron (1982), Maxie (1985), The Lost Boys (1987), Da (1988) - the screen reprise of his most successful stage-role, Doc Hollywood (1991) and the big success Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit (1993). He also played the old man who gave a ride to Felix and Oscar in The Odd Couple II (1998) and was featured in The Fantasticks (1995).

Richard Burton’s Hamlet is a common name for both the Broadway production of William Shakespeare's tragedy that played from April 9 to August 8, 1964 at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, and for the filmed record of it that has been released theatrically and on home video.

<i>Midnight Cowboy</i> 1969 film by John Schlesinger

Midnight Cowboy is a 1969 American buddy drama film. Based on the 1965 novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy, the film was written by Waldo Salt, directed by John Schlesinger, and stars Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman, with notable smaller roles being filled by Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, Bob Balaban, Jennifer Salt, and Barnard Hughes. Set in New York City, Midnight Cowboy depicts the unlikely friendship between two hustlers: naive prostitute Joe Buck (Voight), and ailing con man "Ratso" Rizzo (Hoffman).

Hughes appeared on TV in such series as Naked City , The Secret Storm , Dark Shadows , Love Story , Blossom , and Homicide: Life on the Street . In 1973, he had a notable recurring role on All in the Family as a Roman Catholic priest, Father John Majeski, doing battle with Archie Bunker, and won an Emmy for his portrayal of a senile judge on Lou Grant . Hughes made three appearances in The Bob Newhart Show as the father of Dr. Robert Hartley. He was the central character in three sitcoms: Doc , in which he played a physician; Mr. Merlin , in which he played Merlin, a magician mentoring a 20th-century teenager; and The Cavanaughs , co-starring Christine Ebersole, in which he played the family patriarch (Art Carney played his brother, and Glynis Johns made guest appearances). Hughes sang "Danny Boy" in one episode of the latter series. He also made a memorable appearance as The King (with Jim Dale as The Duke) in the PBS mini-series Adventures of Huckleberry Finn .

<i>Naked City</i> (TV series) American television series

Naked City is a police drama series from Screen Gems which was broadcast from 1958 to 1959 and from 1960 to 1963 on the ABC television network. It was inspired by the 1948 motion picture The Naked City and mimics its dramatic "semi-documentary" format. As in the film, each episode concluded with a narrator intoning the iconic line: "There are eight million stories in the naked city. This has been one of them."

<i>The Secret Storm</i> television series

The Secret Storm is an American soap opera which the CBS television network transmitted from February 1, 1954, to February 8, 1974. It was created by Roy Winsor, who also created the long-running soap operas Search for Tomorrow and Love of Life. Gloria Monty, of General Hospital fame, was a longtime director of the series. Like most CBS soap operas of the time, such as Guiding Light and As the World Turns, The Secret Storm was broadcast live, and later taped, in New York at the CBS Broadcast Center on West 57th Street.

<i>Dark Shadows</i> television series

Dark Shadows is an American Gothic soap opera that originally aired weekdays on the ABC television network, from June 27, 1966, to April 2, 1971. The show depicted the lives, loves, trials and tribulations of the wealthy Collins family of Collinsport, Maine, where a number of supernatural occurrences take place.

Hughes also made recurring appearances on daytime dramas including Guiding Light and As the World Turns as well as a brief appearance as a private investigator in an early episode of Dark Shadows . He also did voice-overs for television commercials advertising Kix cereal.

<i>Guiding Light</i> television series

Guiding Light is an American television soap opera. It is listed in Guinness World Records as the longest-running drama in television in American history, broadcast on CBS for 57 years from June 30, 1952, until September 18, 2009, overlapping a 19-year broadcast on radio from 1937 to 1956. With an uninterrupted 72 years of radio and television runs, Guiding Light is the longest running soap opera, ahead of General Hospital, and the fifth-longest running program in all of broadcast history; only the American country music radio program Grand Ole Opry, the BBC religious program The Daily Service (1928), the CBS religious program Music and the Spoken Word (1929), and the Norwegian children's radio program Lørdagsbarnetimen (1924-2010) have been on the air longer.

<i>As the World Turns</i> television series

As the World Turns is an American television soap opera that aired on CBS for 54 years from April 2, 1956, to September 17, 2010. Irna Phillips created As the World Turns as a sister show to her other soap opera Guiding Light. Running for 54 years, As the World Turns holds the third-longest continuous run of any daytime network soap opera on American television, surpassed only by General Hospital and Guiding Light. As the World Turns was produced for the first 43 years in Manhattan and in Brooklyn from 2000 until 2010.

Private investigator person hired to undertake investigatory law services

A private investigator, a private detective, or inquiry agent, is a person who can be hired by individuals or groups to undertake investigatory law services. Private investigators often work for attorneys in civil and criminal cases.

Selected filmography

YearTitleRoleNotes
1954 Playgirl DurkinUncredited
1961 The Young Doctors Dr. Kent O'Donnell
1964 Hamlet Marcellus / Priest
1967 The Borgia Stick Doctor HelmTV Movie
1969 Midnight Cowboy Towny
1970 Where's Poppa? Colonel Warren J. Hendricks
1971 Dr. Cook's Garden Elias HartTV film
Cold Turkey Dr. Proctor
The Pursuit of Happiness Judge Vogel
The Hospital Edmund DrummondAlso made an uncredited appearance as Dr. Mallory
1972 Sisters Arthur McLennen
1973 Deadhead Miles Old ManUncredited
1972 Rage Dr. Spencer
1975 The UFO Incident Dr. Benjamin SimonTV Movie
1977 Oh, God! Judge Baker
1981 First Monday in October Chief Justice James Jefferson Crawford
1982 Tron Dr. Walter Gibbs
Best Friends Tim McCullen
1985 Maxie Bishop Campbell
1986 Where Are the Children? Jonathan Knowles
1987 The Lost Boys Grandpa
1987 A Hobo's Christmas Chance Grover
1988 Da Nick Tynan
1989 Day One Secretary of War Henry Stimson
1991 Doc Hollywood Dr. Aurelius Hogue
1993 Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit Father Maurice
1995 The Fantasticks Henry Albertson
1998 The Odd Couple II Beaumont
1999 Cradle Will Rock Frank Marvel

Stage productions

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References

  1. "Barnard Hughes Biography". filmreference. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-28.
  2. "Barnard Hughes Dies at 90". Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2008-05-28.