Barne Glacier

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Barne Glacier
Antarctica relief location map.jpg
Blue pog.svg
Location of Barne Glacier in Antarctica
Location Ross Island
Coordinates 77°36′S166°26′E / 77.600°S 166.433°E / -77.600; 166.433
Thicknessunknown
Terminuswest side Ross Island
Statusunknown

Barne Glacier ( 77°36′S166°26′E / 77.600°S 166.433°E / -77.600; 166.433 Coordinates: 77°36′S166°26′E / 77.600°S 166.433°E / -77.600; 166.433 ) is a steep glacier in Antarctica which descends from the western slopes of Mount Erebus and terminates on the west side of Ross Island, between Cape Barne and Cape Evans where it forms a steep ice cliff. It was discovered by the Discovery Expedition, 1901–04, under Robert Falcon Scott, and named by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09, under Ernest Shackleton, after nearby Cape Barne, which itself is named after Michael Barne of Sotterley, Suffolk who was the second lieutenant during the Discovery Expedition.

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