Baron Willoughby de Eresby

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Barony of Willoughby de Eresby
Coronet of a British Baron.svg
Willoughby-Drummond-Heathcote.svg
Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or fretty azure (for Willoughby); 2nd, or three bars wavy gules (for Drummond); 3rd, ermine three pomeis, each charged with a cross or (for Heathcote) [1]
Creation date26 July 1313
Created by Edward II
Peerage Peerage of England
First holderRobert de Willoughby
Present holder Jane Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, 28th Baroness Willoughby de Eresby
Heir apparentSebastian St Maur Miller (co-heir)
Sir John Aird, 4th Baronet (co-heir)
MottoLoyauté me oblige ("Loyalty binds me") [1]
Arms of Willoughby, adopted by the 3rd Baron Willoughby de Eresby upon his marriage (c. 1349) to Cecily Ufford: Quarterly 1 & 4: Sable, a cross engrailed or (Ufford); 2 & 3: Gules, a cross moline argent (Bec of Eresby) WilloughbyArms.png
Arms of Willoughby, adopted by the 3rd Baron Willoughby de Eresby upon his marriage (c. 1349) to Cecily Ufford: Quarterly 1 & 4: Sable, a cross engrailed or (Ufford); 2 & 3: Gules, a cross moline argent (Bec of Eresby)
Catherine Willoughby, 12th Baroness Willoughby de Eresby Catherine, Duchess of Suffolk by Hans Holbein the Younger.jpg
Catherine Willoughby, 12th Baroness Willoughby de Eresby

Baron Willoughby de Eresby ( /ˈwɪləbiˈdɪərzbi/ WIL-ə-bee DEERZ-bee) [2] is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1313 for Robert de Willoughby. Since 1983, the title has been held by Jane Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, 28th Baroness Willoughby de Eresby.

Contents

History

The title of Baron Willoughby was created by writ in 1313 for Robert de Willoughby, lord of the manor of Eresby in the parish of Spilsby, Lincolnshire. He was the son of Sir William de Willoughby and Alice, daughter of John Beke, 1st Baron Beke of Eresby. The writ was addressed to "Roberto de Wylghby," and the suffix of de Eresby was added to the title between 1350-1360 to distinguish it from other members of the de Willoughby family. [1]

The fourteenth Baron was created Earl of Lindsey in 1626. His great-grandson, the fourth Earl and seventeenth Baron, was created Marquess of Lindsey in 1706 and Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven in 1715. On the death of the first Duke's great-grandson, the fourth Duke, the Dukedom, Marquessate and Earldom were inherited by his uncle, while the Barony of Willoughby de Eresby fell into abeyance between the late Duke's sisters Lady Priscilla and Lady Georgiana. In 1780, the title was called out of abeyance in favour of Priscilla. She was the wife of Peter Burrell, 1st Baron Gwydyr. Their son Peter inherited both Baronies. On the death of Peter's only son Albyric, the Barony of Gwydyr was passed on to a cousin, while the Barony of Willoughby de Eresby fell into abeyance between his sisters Clementina Drummond-Willoughby, wife of Gilbert John Heathcote, 1st Baron Aveland and Charlotte, wife of Robert Carrington, 2nd Baron Carrington. In 1871 the abeyance was terminated in favour of Clementina. She was succeeded by her and Lord Aveland's son Gilbert, 2nd Baron Aveland and 25th Baron Willoughby de Eresby. In 1892 he was created Earl of Ancaster, a revival of the Ancaster title created for his maternal ancestor in 1715. On the death of his grandson, the third Earl, in 1983, the Earldom and Barony of Aveland became extinct (while the Baronetcy also held by the Earl was passed on to a distant relative), while the Barony of Willoughby de Eresby was inherited by the late Earl's daughter, Nancy, the present holder of the title.

Since 1626, the Barony of Willoughby de Eresby has been associated with office of Lord Great Chamberlain. In that year, the first Earl of Lindsey inherited the Great Chamberlainship. Upon the death of the fourth Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, it was divided between his sisters Priscilla and Georgiana (who was later Marchioness of Cholmondeley). Thereafter, the barony of Willoughby de Eresby has been associated with the senior share of the Lord Great Chamberlainship. However, it has not been associated with the highest share. The share belonging to Lady Cholmondeley has been passed intact to her heirs, the Marquesses of Cholmondeley, but Lady Willoughby de Eresby's share has been split between many heirs. As of 2004, only one-fourth of the Lord Great Chamberlainship is possessed by the holder of the barony.

The peerage has been held by a woman six times, more than any other peerage except that of Baron de Ros.

The family seats are Grimsthorpe Castle in Edenham, near Bourne, Lincolnshire and Drummond Castle, near Crieff, Perthshire, Scotland, originally the family seat of the Drummond earls of Perth. The Baroness also owns Drummond Castle which is managed by the Grimsthorpe and Drummond Castle Trust. [3]

Barons Willoughby de Eresby (1313)

The Ancient Arms of Willoughby (bef. 1300 - c.1349) Willoughby arms.svg
The Ancient Arms of Willoughby (bef. 1300 - c.1349)
Priscilla Bertie, 21st Baroness Willoughby de Eresby (1761-1828), portrait miniature by Sampson Towgood Roch. Priscilla, Lady Willoughby de Eresby.png
Priscilla Bertie, 21st Baroness Willoughby de Eresby (1761–1828), portrait miniature by Sampson Towgood Roch.
Arms of Bertie: Argent, three battering rams fesswise in pale or headed armed and garnished azure (family of Priscilla Barbara Elizabeth Bertie, 21st Baroness Willoughby de Eresby (1761-1828)) 21st Baroness Willoughby de Eresby coa.png
Arms of Bertie: Argent, three battering rams fesswise in pale or headed armed and garnished azure (family of Priscilla Barbara Elizabeth Bertie, 21st Baroness Willoughby de Eresby (1761–1828))

The co-heirs presumptive are Sebastian St Maur Miller (b. 1965) and Sir John Aird, 4th Baronet (b. 1940). The former is the son of Carola Ramsden, the only child of the 26th Baron's elder daughter, Lady Catherine. The latter is the eldest child and only son of the 26th Baron's younger daughter, Lady Priscilla.

See also

Further reading

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Earl of Lindsey</span> Title in the Peerage of England

Earl of Lindsey is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1626 for the 14th Baron Willoughby de Eresby. He was First Lord of the Admiralty from 1635 to 1636 and also established his claim in right of his mother to the hereditary office of Lord Great Chamberlain of England. Lord Lindsey fought on the Royalist side in the Civil War and was killed at the Battle of Edgehill on 23 October 1642. He was succeeded by his son, the second Earl. He also fought at Edgehill and surrendered to the Parliamentarians in order to attend his mortally wounded father. Lord Lindsey later fought at the First Battle of Newbury, Second Battle of Newbury, and at Naseby. His son from his second marriage, James, was created Earl of Abingdon in 1682. He was succeeded by his son from his first marriage to Martha Cockayne, the third Earl. He represented Boston in the House of Commons and served as Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire.

There have been two baronetcies created for persons with the surname Wynn, with the Gwydir family in the Baronetage of England and the Bodvean family in the Baronetage of Great Britain.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Robert Bertie, 1st Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven</span>

Robert Bertie, 1st Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven PC, styled17th Baron Willoughby de Eresby between 1666 and 1701, and known as 4th Earl of Lindsey between 1701 and 1706, and as 1st Marquess of Lindsey between 1706 and 1715, was a British statesman and nobleman.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Peregrine Bertie, 2nd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven</span>

Peregrine Bertie, 2nd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, styled The Honourable Peregrine Bertie between 1686 and 1704, Lord Willoughby de Eresby between 1704 and 1715 and Marquess of Lindsey between 1715 and 1723, was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1708 until 1715 when he was called to the House of Lords.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Grimsthorpe Castle</span> Country house in Lincolnshire, England

Grimsthorpe Castle is a country house in Lincolnshire, England 4 miles (6.4 km) north-west of Bourne on the A151. It lies within a 3,000 acre (12 km2) park of rolling pastures, lakes, and woodland landscaped by Capability Brown. While Grimsthorpe is not a castle in the strict sense of the word, its character is massive and martial – the towers and outlying pavilions recalling the bastions of a great fortress in classical dress. Grimsthorpe has been the home of the de Eresby family since 1516. The present owner is Jane Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, 28th Baroness Willoughby de Eresby, granddaughter of Nancy Astor, who died at Grimsthorpe in 1964.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Peregrine Bertie, 3rd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven</span>

General Peregrine Bertie, 3rd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, styled Lord Willoughby de Eresby from 1715 to 1723 and Marquess of Lindsey from 1735 to 1742, was the son of Peregrine Bertie, 2nd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Gilbert Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, 1st Earl of Ancaster</span> British politician

Gilbert Henry Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, 1st Earl of Ancaster,, known as 2nd Baron Aveland from 1867 to 1888 and as 25th Baron Willoughby de Eresby from 1888 to 1892, was a British Liberal politician and court official.

Gilbert James Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, 3rd Earl of Ancaster, styled Lord Willoughby de Eresby from 1910 to 1951, was a British Conservative politician.

Clementina Elizabeth Drummond-Willoughby, 24th Baroness Willoughby de Eresby was a suo jure British baroness. She was the daughter of Peter Robert Drummond-Burrell, 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Sarah Clementina, née Drummond. On the death of her brother, Albyric Drummond-Willoughby, 23rd Baron Willoughby de Eresby, in 1871, the Barony of Willoughby de Eresby fell into abeyance between her sister, Charlotte, and her. On 13 November 1871, the abeyance of the barony was terminated in her favour.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Priscilla Bertie, 21st Baroness Willoughby de Eresby</span>

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Albyric Drummond-Willoughby, 23rd Baron Willoughby de Eresby</span>

Albyric Drummond-Willoughby, 3rd Baron Gwydyr, 23rd Baron Willoughby de Eresby, was a British noble baron. He was the son of Peter Drummond-Burrell, 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby, and Sarah Clementina, née Drummond. He never married.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Peter Drummond-Burrell, 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby</span>

Peter Robert Drummond-Burrell, 2nd Baron Gwydyr, 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby PC, was a British politician and nobleman.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Robert Bertie, 4th Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven</span>

Robert Bertie, 4th Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, PC, styled Lord Robert Bertie until 1758 and Marquess of Lindsey between 1758 and 1778, was a British peer. He was born in Grimsthorpe, the second son of the General Peregrine Bertie, 3rd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, and Mary Panton

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Gilbert Heathcote, 1st Baron Aveland</span> British peer and politician

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Nancy Jane Marie Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, 28th Baroness Willoughby de Eresby is an English peer and member of the Astor family. She is a 14 holder of the office of Lord Great Chamberlain, which is exercised by the 7th Baron Carrington.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mary Bertie, Duchess of Ancaster and Kesteven</span>

Mary Bertie, Duchess of Ancaster and Kesteven, formerly Mary Panton, was the second wife of Peregrine Bertie, 3rd Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven. She was the daughter of Thomas Panton of Newmarket (1697-1782), who was an equerry to King George II and master of the Thurlow Hunt, and his wife Priscilla.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Mosley, Charles, ed. (2003). Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knighthood (107 ed.). Burke's Peerage & Gentry. pp. 4193–4194. ISBN   0-9711966-2-1.
  2. "Willoughby". Merriam-Webster Dictionary . Retrieved 21 January 2016.
  3. Drummond Castle Gardens in winter: The winter beauty of the gardens made famous by Outlander
  4. Kidd, Charles, Debrett's peerage & Baronetage 2015 Edition, London, 2015, p.P751
  5. Sir Bernard Burke. A genealogical history of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited, and extinct peerages of the British empire. Harrison, 1866. pg 586, 1049.
  6. Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham. Plantagenet ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families. Genealogical Publishing Com, 2004. pg 325.