Barry Award (for crime novels)

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Peter May with the 2013 Barry Award for Best Novel, for his book, "The Blackhouse". Peter May with 2013 Barry Award.JPG
Peter May with the 2013 Barry Award for Best Novel, for his book, "The Blackhouse".
Denise Mina, Prize for best British novel in 2006 DeniseMina.jpg
Denise Mina, Prize for best British novel in 2006
Carlos Ruiz Zafon, Prize for best first book in 2005 Carlos Ruiz Zafon - 002.jpg
Carlos Ruiz Zafón, Prize for best first book in 2005
Laura Lippman, Prize for best novel in 2004 and 2008 LauraLippman.jpg
Laura Lippman, Prize for best novel in 2004 and 2008
Val McDermid, Prize for best British novel in 2000 and 2004 ValMcDermid.jpg
Val McDermid, Prize for best British novel in 2000 and 2004
Harlan Coben, Prize for best novel published as a paperback original in 1998 HarlanCoben.jpg
Harlan Coben, Prize for best novel published as a paperback original in 1998

The Barry Award is a crime literary prize awarded annually since 1997 by the editors of Deadly Pleasures, an American quarterly publication for crime fiction readers. From 2007 to 2009 the award was jointly presented with the publication Mystery News. The prize is named after Barry Gardner, an American critic. [1]

Contents

Note that the "best British crime novel" in this context is best crime fiction novel first published in English in the United Kingdom and does not reflect the author's nationality.

Winners

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

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References

  1. "The Barry Awards". Deadly Pleasures. 2008-10-09. Archived from the original on 2012-04-23. Retrieved 2012-01-27.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. "Barry Awards (Crime Fiction) – 2020". Nightstand Book Reviews. Retrieved 12 May 2021.
  3. "Barry Awards - 2019 -". Nightstand Book Reviews. 2019-01-21. Retrieved 2019-11-08.
  4. Mem: 9367232. "McTiernan wins Barry Award for best paperback original | Books+Publishing" . Retrieved 2021-03-21.
  5. "2013 Barry Award Winners". Crimespree Magazine. Retrieved 25 September 2013.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)