Barry Malkin

Last updated
Barry Malkin
Born(1938-10-26)October 26, 1938
DiedApril 4, 2019(2019-04-04) (aged 80)
Occupation Editor
Years active1964–2004

Barry M. Malkin (October 26, 1938 – April 4, 2019) was an American film editor with about 30 film credits. He is noted for his extended collaboration with director Francis Ford Coppola, having edited most of Coppola's films from 1969-1997. In particular, Malkin worked with Coppola on four of the component and compilation films of the Godfather Trilogy , though he did not edit the first film, The Godfather . The prominent film critic Roger Ebert called the first two Godfather films a "cultural bedrock". [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

Francis Ford Coppola 20th and 21st-century American film director and producer

Francis Ford Coppola is an American film director, producer, screenwriter and film composer. He was a central figure in the New Hollywood filmmaking movement of the 1960s and 1970s.

<i>The Godfather</i> 1972 US film directed by Francis Ford Coppola

The Godfather is a 1972 American crime film directed by Francis Ford Coppola and produced by Albert S. Ruddy, based on Mario Puzo's best-selling novel of the same name. It stars Marlon Brando and Al Pacino as the leaders of a fictional New York crime family. The story, spanning 1945 to 1955, chronicles the family under the patriarch Vito Corleone (Brando), focusing on the transformation of Michael Corleone (Pacino) from reluctant family outsider to ruthless mafia boss.

Roger Ebert American film critic, author, journalist, and TV presenter

Roger Joseph Ebert was an American film critic, historian, journalist, screenwriter, and author. He was a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. In 1975, Ebert became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism.

Contents

Early career

Malkin worked as an apprentice to editor Dede Allen on the film America America (directed by Elia Kazan-1962), and became acquainted with editor Aram Avakian, who was an occasional visitor. [4] Malkin became Avakian's assistant editor on Lilith (directed by Robert Rossen-1964). Malkin got his first credits as a full editor on The Patty Duke Show (TV) and on the "Z movie" The Fat Spy (1966). Francis Ford Coppola heard of Malkin from Avakian, who had edited Coppola's film You're a Big Boy Now (1966); it turned out that Malkin and Coppola had been acquainted as teenagers growing up in the same Queens neighborhood. Coppola engaged Malkin to edit his fourth film as director, The Rain People (1969). [7] [8] He worked as an associate editor on two additional films edited by Robert Q. Lovett: End of the Road (directed by Aram Avakian-1970), and Cotton Comes to Harlem (directed by Ossie Davis-1970). Malkin was the editor for the 1973 film directed by Avakian, Cops and Robbers .

Dorothea Carothers "Dede" Allen was an American film editor, well-known "film editing doctor" to the major American movie studios, and one of cinema's all-time celebrated 'auteur' film editors.

<i>America America</i> 1963 dramatic film by Elia Kazan

America America is a 1963 American dramatic film directed, produced and written by Elia Kazan, adapted from his own book, published in 1962. The dust jacket of the novel has no comma in the title, nor does the title in the film itself. Many listings of the film include a comma.

Elia Kazan Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist

Elia Kazan was a Greek-American director, producer, writer and actor, described by The New York Times as "one of the most honored and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history".

The Godfather and the 1970s

The Godfather was extremely successful artistically and at the box-office; among other distinctions, it won the Academy Award for Best Picture for 1972. Production of a sequel, The Godfather Part II , started in 1973. William Reynolds and Peter Zinner had edited The Godfather, and been nominated for the Academy Award for Best Film Editing for their work. For the sequel, Malkin and Richard Marks joined Zinner as co-editors. Godfather Part II, which was released in 1974 and enjoyed success comparable to The Godfather, is noted for its intercutting between two storylines, one from Sicily in the early 20th century, and a second contemporary story that follows the first film's action. Coppola subsequently asked Malkin to edit a television miniseries, The Godfather Saga (1977), that was based on the two films. The miniseries incorporated scenes that could not be included in the original versions, and replaced the complex intercutting between time periods of the original films with a more straightforward chronological ordering. [9]

The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the Academy Awards (Oscars) presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) since the awards debuted in 1929. This award goes to the producers of the film and is the only category in which every member of the Academy is eligible to submit a nomination and vote on the final ballot. Best Picture is the final award of the night and is considered the most prestigious honor of the ceremony.

<i>The Godfather Part II</i> 1974 film directed by Francis Ford Coppola

The Godfather Part II is a 1974 American crime film produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola from a screenplay co-written with Mario Puzo, starring Al Pacino and Robert De Niro. Partially based on Puzo's 1969 novel The Godfather, the film is both sequel and prequel to The Godfather, presenting parallel dramas: one picks up the 1958 story of Michael Corleone (Pacino), the new Don of the Corleone crime family, protecting the family business in the aftermath of an attempt on his life; the prequel covers the journey of his father, Vito Corleone played by De Niro, from his Sicilian childhood to the founding of his family enterprise in New York City.

William Henry Reynolds was an American film editor whose career spanned six decades. His credits include such notable films as The Sound of Music, The Godfather, The Sting, and The Turning Point. He also was associated with two of the most infamous projects in film history, Ishtar and Heaven's Gate, which he executive produced.

Malkin was an additional editor for Apocalypse Now (1979), and a supervising editor for the Coppola-produced film Hammett (directed by Wim Wenders, 1982). In this period, Malkin also edited Four Friends (1981), which was directed by Arthur Penn. Dede Allen had edited Penn's films since Bonnie and Clyde (1967), but was unavailable for this film. [10] Stephen Prince has written of the contrast between them: "... the difference an editor makes on a director's films is evident by comparing his more linear approach to Dede Allen's fractured and off-center cutting". [11]

<i>Apocalypse Now</i> 1979 American war film directed by Francis Ford Coppola

Apocalypse Now is a 1979 American epic war film about the Vietnam War, directed, produced and co-written by Francis Ford Coppola. It stars Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen, Frederic Forrest, Albert Hall, Sam Bottoms, Laurence Fishburne and Dennis Hopper. The screenplay, co-written by Coppola and John Milius and narration written by Michael Herr, is a loose adaptation of the 1899 novella Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. The setting was changed from late 19th-century Congo to the Vietnam War (1969–70), the years in which Green Beret Colonel Robert Rheault, commander of the 5th Special Forces Group, was indicted for murder and President Richard Nixon authorized the secret Cambodian Campaign. Coppola said that Rheault was an inspiration for the character of Colonel Kurtz.

<i>Hammett</i> (film) 1982 film by Wim Wenders

Hammett is a 1982 mystery film directed by Wim Wenders and executive produced by Francis Ford Coppola. The screenplay was written by Ross Thomas and Dennis O'Flaherty, based on the novel of the same name by Joe Gores. It stars Frederic Forrest as detective story writer Dashiell Hammett, who gets caught up in a mystery very much like one of his own stories. Marilu Henner plays Hammett's neighbor, Kit Conger, and Peter Boyle plays Jimmy Ryan, an old friend from Hammett's days as a Pinkerton agent.

Wim Wenders German film director, playwright, screenwriter, photographer and film producer

Ernst Wilhelm "Wim" Wenders is a German filmmaker, playwright, author, and photographer. He is a major figure in New German Cinema. Among many honors, he has received three nominations for the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature: for Buena Vista Social Club (1999), about Cuban music culture; Pina (2011), about the contemporary dance choreographer Pina Bausch; and The Salt of the Earth (2014), about Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado.

1980s and 1990s

During the 1980s Malkin edited six of Coppola's films, from Rumble Fish (1983) through The Godfather Part III (1990). He was joined by his former mentor Robert Q. Lovett for The Cotton Club (1984), which garnered the two editors a nomination for the Academy Award. Malkin also edited the film Big (1988) that was directed by Penny Marshall. By the end of the decade Coppola had agreed to make The Godfather Part III (1990), and brought in Malkin, Lisa Fruchtman, and Walter Murch to edit. Malkin and Murch then edited a compilation entitled The Godfather Trilogy: 1901–1980 that was released to video in 1992. The compilation included footage from the theatrically released versions of all three films as well as additional footage. [12] A 1993 review in Time reads, "This trilogy has a novelistic density, a rueful, unhurried lyricism and a depth that, singly, the films could not achieve. Altogether glorious." [13]

<i>The Cotton Club</i> (film) 1984 film by Francis Ford Coppola

The Cotton Club is a 1984 American crime-drama film centered on a Harlem jazz club of the 1930s, the Cotton Club. The film was co-written and directed by Francis Ford Coppola, choreographed by Henry LeTang, and starred Richard Gere, Gregory Hines, Diane Lane, and Lonette McKee. The supporting cast included Bob Hoskins, James Remar, Nicolas Cage, Allen Garfield, Laurence Fishburne, Gwen Verdon and Fred Gwynne.

Academy Award for Best Film Editing one of the annual awards of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

The Academy Award for Best Film Editing is one of the annual awards of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Nominations for this award are closely correlated with the Academy Award for Best Picture. For 33 consecutive years, 1981 to 2013, every Best Picture winner had also been nominated for the Film Editing Oscar, and about two thirds of the Best Picture winners have also won for Film Editing. Only the principal, "above the line" editor(s) as listed in the film's credits are named on the award; additional editors, supervising editors, etc. are not currently eligible. The nominations for this Academy Award are determined by a ballot of the voting members of the Editing Branch of the Academy; there were 220 members of the Editing Branch in 2012. The members may vote for up to five of the eligible films in the order of their preference; the five films with the largest vote totals are selected as nominees. The Academy Award itself is selected from the nominated films by a subsequent ballot of all active and life members of the Academy. This process is essentially the reverse of that of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA); nominations for the BAFTA Award for Best Editing are done by a general ballot of Academy voters, and the winner is selected by members of the editing chapter.

<i>Big</i> (film) 1988 film by Penny Marshall

Big is a 1988 American fantasy comedy film directed by Penny Marshall, and stars Tom Hanks as Adult Josh Baskin, a young boy who makes a wish "to be big" and is then aged to adulthood overnight. The film also stars Elizabeth Perkins, David Moscow as young Josh, John Heard and Robert Loggia, and was written by Gary Ross and Anne Spielberg.

In the 1990s, in addition to his work with Coppola on Jack (1996) and The Rainmaker (1997), Malkin edited four films with director Andrew Bergman. Their first film together, The Freshman (1992), is to some extent a comic "sendup" of the original 1972 Godfather film, including a part played by Marlon Brando. Malkin's last credit was for The Big Bounce (2004), which was directed by George Armitage.

<i>Jack</i> (1996 film) 1996 ensemble cast comedy-drama film directed by Francis Ford Coppola

Jack is a 1996 American comedy-drama film starring Robin Williams and directed by Francis Ford Coppola. The film co-stars Diane Lane, Jennifer Lopez, Fran Drescher, Bill Cosby, and Brian Kerwin. Williams plays the role of Jack Powell, a boy who ages four times faster than normal as a result of Werner syndrome, a form of progeria.

Andrew Bergman is an American screenwriter, film director, and novelist. New York magazine in 1985 dubbed him "The Unknown King of Comedy". His best known films include Blazing Saddles, The In-Laws, and The Freshman.

<i>The Freshman</i> (1990 film) 1990 film by Andrew Bergman

The Freshman is a 1990 American crime comedy film starring Marlon Brando and Matthew Broderick, in which Brando parodies his portrayal of Vito Corleone in The Godfather. It was written and directed by Andrew Bergman.

Awards

Malkin, Marks, and Zinner were nominated for the BAFTA Award for Best Editing for The Godfather: Part II (1974). He and Robert Q. Lovett were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Film Editing for The Cotton Club (directed by Francis Ford Coppola-1984). Malkin, Murch, and Fruchtman were nominated for the Academy Award for editing The Godfather Part III (1990). Malkin was selected for membership in the American Cinema Editors. [14]

Filmography (as editor)

The director for each film is indicated in parenthesis. Filmography based on Oldham's book [4] and the Internet Movie Database. [5]

Related Research Articles

<i>The Conversation</i> 1974 film by Francis Ford Coppola

The Conversation is a 1974 American mystery thriller film written, produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Gene Hackman with supporting roles by John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Cindy Williams, Frederic Forrest, Harrison Ford, Teri Garr and Robert Duvall.

Walter Murch American film editor and sound designer

Walter Scott Murch is an American film editor, director and sound designer. With a career stretching back to 1969, including work on Apocalypse Now, The Godfather I, II, and III, American Graffiti, The Conversation, and The English Patient, with three Academy Award wins, he has been referred to by Roger Ebert as "the most respected film editor and sound designer in the modern cinema."

Carmine Valentino Coppola was an American composer, flautist, editor, musical director, and songwriter who contributed original music to The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, Apocalypse Now, The Outsiders, and The Godfather Part III, all directed by his son Francis Ford Coppola.

The Godfather Saga is a TV miniseries that combines The Godfather and The Godfather Part II into one film. It originally aired on NBC over four consecutive nights in November 1977. The Godfather Saga is also known as The Godfather: The Complete Novel for Television, The Godfather: A Novel for Television, The Godfather Novella, and The Godfather Epic. The television version was the basis for a shorter, 1981 video release known as The Godfather 1902–1959: The Complete Epic. Following the release of The Godfather Part III in 1990, a third unified version was released to video in 1992 entitled The Godfather Trilogy: 1901–1980.

Alisa Lepselter is an American film editor who has edited director Woody Allen's films since 1999.

Gian-Carlo Coppola was an American film producer.

Gerald B. "Jerry" Greenberg was an American film editor with more than 40 feature film credits. Greenberg received both the Academy Award for Best Film Editing and the BAFTA Award for Best Editing for the film The French Connection (1971). In the 1980s, he edited five films with director Brian De Palma.

This is a list of winners and nominees for the BAFTA Award for Best Editing, which is presented to film editors, given out by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts since 1968.

Richard Marks was an American film editor with more than 30 editing credits for feature and television films dating from 1972. In an extended, notable collaboration (1983–2010), he edited all of director James L. Brooks' feature films.

Peter Zinner was an Austrian-born American filmmaker who worked as a film editor, sound editor, and producer. Following nearly fifteen years of uncredited work as an assistant sound editor, Zinner received credits on more than fifty films from 1959 - 2006. His most influential films are likely The Godfather and The Godfather Part II, both of which appear on a 2012 listing of the 75 best edited films of all time compiled by the Motion Picture Editors Guild.

The Godfather is an American film series that consists of three crime drama films directed by Francis Ford Coppola inspired by the novel of the same name by Italian American author Mario Puzo. The films follow the trials of the Italian American mafia Corleone family whose patriarch, Vito Corleone, rises to be a major figure in American organized crime. His youngest son, Michael Corleone, becomes his successor. The films were distributed by Paramount Pictures and released in 1972, 1974 and 1990. The series achieved success at the box office, with the films earning over $550 million worldwide. The Godfather is seen by many as one of the greatest films of all time, while The Godfather Part II is viewed by many as the best sequel in cinematic history. The series is heavily awarded, winning 9 out of 29 total Academy Award nominations.

Aram A. Avakian was an Armenian-American film editor and director. His work in the latter role includes Jazz on a Summer's Day (1960) and the indie film End of the Road (1970).

The Dirty Dozen is the nickname for a group of filmmaking students at the USC School of Cinematic Arts within the University of Southern California during the mid-late 1960s. The main group consisted of budding directors, screenwriters, producers, editors, and cinematographers. Through innovative techniques and effects, they ended up achieving great success in the Hollywood film industry.

Mark Berger is an American sound engineer. He has won four Academy Awards for Best Sound. He holds the Academy Award record for "perfect score" with 4 nominations and 4 wins. He is best known for his work on The Godfather Part II (1974), One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) and Apocalypse Now (1979). He has worked on more than 170 films since 1973.

Lisa Fruchtman is an American film and television editor, and documentary director with about 25 film credits. Fruchtman won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing for The Right Stuff (1983). With her brother, Rob Fruchtman, she produced, directed, and edited the 2012 documentary Sweet Dreams.

A list of books and essays about Francis Ford Coppola:

References

  1. Moreau, Jordan (April 5, 2019). "Barry Malkin, 'The Godfather: Part II' Editor, Dies at 80". Variety.
  2. Barnes, Mike (April 5, 2019). "Barry Malkin, Francis Ford Coppola's Film Editor and Two-Time Oscar Nominee, Dies at 80". The Hollywood Reporter.
  3. Malkin worked on thirteen films directed by Coppola in this period; see the filmography in this article. He did not work on The Godfather (1972), The Conversation (1974), One from the Heart (1982), The Outsiders (1983), Captain EO (1986), Tucker: The Man and his Dream (1988), and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992); for Coppola's filmography see "Francis Ford Coppola > Filmography >> AllMovie". allmovie.com. Retrieved 2009-12-23.
  4. 1 2 3 4 Oldham, Gabriella (1995). First Cut: Conversations with Film Editors. University of California Press. pp. 323–324. ISBN   978-0-520-07588-7.
  5. 1 2 Barry Malkin on IMDb
  6. Ebert, Roger (October 2, 2008). "The Godfather, Part II (1974)". Chicago Sun Times. ... why is it a "great movie"? Because it must be seen as a piece with the unqualified greatness of "The Godfather." The two can hardly be considered apart ("Part III" is another matter). When the characters in a film take on a virtual reality for us, when a character in another film made 30 years later can say "The Godfather" contains all the lessons in life you need to know, when an audience understands why that statement could be made, a film has become a cultural bedrock.
  7. Oldham, Gabriella (1995). First Cut: Conversations with Film Editors. University of California Press. p. 326. ISBN   978-0-520-07588-7.
  8. Phillips, Gene D. (2004). Godfather: The Intimate Francis Ford Coppola. University Press of Kentucky. p. 56. ISBN   978-0-8131-2304-2. Barry Malkin was selected by Coppola as editor for the movie. He was a boyhood acquaintance of the director's from Queens.
  9. Phillips, Gene D. (2004). Godfather: The Intimate Francis Ford Coppola. University Press of Kentucky. pp. 129–130. ISBN   978-0-8131-2304-2. Coppola asked Barry Malkin to reassemble the footage of the two films into chronological order.
  10. Penn, Arthur; Chaiken, Michael; Cronin, Paul (2008). Arthur Penn: Interviews. University Press of Mississippi. p. 156. ISBN   978-1-60473-105-7. I really miss not having Dede Allen, who has edited all my films since Bonnie and Clyde, but she was working on (Warren Beatty's) Reds at the time. Barry Malkin, who I got to replace her, has had the same training and comes from the same background. He was perfect for the job.
  11. Prince, Stephen (2002). A New Pot of Gold: Hollywood Under the Electronic Rainbow 1980-1989 (Volume 10 of History of the American cinema). University of California Press. p. 197. ISBN   978-0-520-23266-2. Barry Malkin cut Coppola's Rumble Fish , Cotton Club , Peggy Sue Got Married , and Gardens of Stone as well as the Coppola-produced Hammett . He also cut Arthur Penn's Four Friends (1981), and the difference an editor makes on a director's films is evident by comparing his more linear approach to Dede Allen's fractured and off-center cutting.
  12. Malta, J. Geoff (2006). "The Godfather Trilogy: 1901-1980". Archived from the original on 2008-03-28. This webpage reproduces material originally distributed with the "home video" release.
  13. "Short Takes". Time Magazine. March 1, 1993.
  14. "American Cinema Editors > Members". American Cinema Editors. Archived from the original on 2008-03-04.