Basil O'Meara

Last updated
Basil O'Meara
Born(1892-06-05)June 5, 1892
Ontario, Canada
DiedOctober 25, 1971(1971-10-25) (aged 79)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Occupationjournalist
Years active1910 – c. 1968
Employer Montreal Star
Spouse(s)Helen Margaret Gleeson
Children
  • Elizabeth Helen O'Meara
  • John O'Meara
  • Patricia O'Meara
  • David O'Meara
Parent(s)John Francis Xavier O'Meara
Awards Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award (1984)

Basil Edmund "Baz" O'Meara (June 5, 1892 – October 25, 1971), was a Canadian sports journalist. A columnist for the Montreal Star , he won the Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award in 1984 and is a member of the media section of the Hockey Hall of Fame. In 1979, O'Meara was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame. [1] [2] O'Meara joined the Star in 1929 and retired at the age of 76 around 1968. Although controversy exists over this claim, he was widely credited with nicknaming Maurice Richard "Rocket". He began his career at the Ottawa Free Press in 1910. [3] He died of a massive stroke in 1971.

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References

  1. "Basil O'Meara". Canadian Football Hall of Fame. cfhof.ca. Retrieved 12 December 2015.
  2. "Legends of Hockey - Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award Winners". hhof.com. Retrieved 19 May 2015.
  3. Sports writer covered action for 50 years Meara, Baz O The Globe and Mail (1936-Current); Oct 26, 1971; ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The Globe and Mail pg. 37