Basketball (ball)

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A typical basketball Basketball.png
A typical basketball

A basketball is a spherical ball used in basketball games. Basketballs usually range in size from very small promotional items that are only a few inches (some centimeters) in diameter to extra large balls nearly 2 feet (60 cm) in diameter used in training exercises. For example, a youth basketball could be 27 inches (69 cm) in circumference, while a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) men's ball would be a maximum of 30 inches (76 cm) and an NCAA women's ball would be a maximum of 29 inches (74 cm). The standard for a basketball in the National Basketball Association (NBA) is 29.5 inches (75 cm) in circumference and for the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA), a maximum circumference of 29 inches (74 cm). High school and junior leagues normally use NCAA, NBA or WNBA sized balls. [1] [2]

Contents

Aside from the court and the baskets, the basketball is the only piece of equipment necessary to play the game of basketball. During the game, the ball must be bounced continuously (dribbling), thrown through the air to other players (passing) or thrown towards the basket (shooting). Therefore, the ball must be very durable and easy to hold on to. The ball is also used to perform tricks (sometimes called freestyling), the most common of which are spinning the ball on the tip of one's index finger, dribbling in complex patterns, rolling the ball over one's shoulder, or performing aerobatic maneuvers with the ball while executing a slam dunk, most notably in the context of a slam dunk contest.

Characteristics

Nearly all basketballs have an inflatable inner rubber bladder, generally wrapped in layers of fiber and then covered with a surface made either from leather (traditional), rubber, or a synthetic composite. As in most inflatable balls, there is a small opening that allows the pressure to be increased or decreased.

The surface of the ball is nearly always divided by "ribs" that are recessed below the surface of the ball in a variety of configurations and are generally a contrasting color. An orangish surface with black ribs and a possible logo is the traditional color scheme of basketballs but they are sold in various colors. Most famous of these variations, a red/white/blue basketball, was used for the American Basketball Association, the Harlem Globetrotters, and as the "money ball" in the NBA All-Star Weekend's Three Point Contest.

Balls are generally designated for indoor (generally made of leather or absorbent composites), or all-surface use (generally made of rubber or durable composites, also known as indoor/outdoor balls). Indoor balls tend to be more expensive than all-surface balls due to the cost of materials. In addition, brand new all-leather indoor balls must be "broken in" first to achieve optimal grip before use in competition. The abrasiveness of asphalt and the dirt and moisture present in an outdoor setting will usually ruin an indoor ball within a very short period of time, which is why an indoor/outdoor ball is recommended for recreational players. Outdoor balls are usually called outdoor rubber basketballs & they are commonly made from rubber to cope with rougher conditions, and they need to be filled with more air to retain a suitable level of air pressure in colder weather. [3]

Sizes

Different sizes are used for different age groups. [4] [5] The common standards are:

SizeTypeCircumferenceWeightNotes on basketball
7Men29.5 in (75 cm)
[749–780 mm
29.5–30.7 in] [5]
22 oz (620 g)
[567–650 g
20–23 oz] [5]
Men and boys ages 15 and up. This is the official size for men's high school, college, and professional.
6Women28.5 in (72 cm)
[724–737 mm
28.5–29.0 in] [5]
20 oz (570 g)
[510–567 g
18–20 oz] [5]
Boys ages 12–14. Women and girls ages 12 and up. This is the official size for women’s high school, college, and professional.
5Youth (North America) [4]
Mini (FIBA) [5]
27.5 in (70 cm)
[690–710 mm
27.2–28.0 in] [5]
17 oz (480 g)
[470–500 g
17–18 oz] [5]
Boys and girls ages 9–11 years old. This is the standard youth basketball.
4Youth (North America) [4] 25.5 in (65 cm)14 oz (400 g)Boys and girls ages 5–8 years old.
3Mini (North America) [4] 22.0 in (56 cm)10 oz (280 g)Boys and girls ages 4–8 years old. Also known as “mini” basketball.

Note that the ball used for all competitions (men's, women's, and mixed) in the formalized halfcourt game of 3x3 combines characteristics of the size 6 and size 7 balls. Its circumference is that of a size 6 ball, but its weight is that of a size 7. [6]

History

A historic basketball. Basketball historic.tif
A historic basketball.

In early December 1891, the chairman of the physical education department at the School for Christian Workers (now Springfield College) in Springfield, Massachusetts, instructed physical education teacher James Naismith, to invent a new game to entertain the school's athletes in the winter season. Naismith assembled his class of 18 young men, appointed captains of two nine-player teams, and set in motion the first ever basketball game, played with a soccer ball and two peach baskets tacked to either end of the gymnasium.

The first purpose-built basketballs were made from panels of leather stitched together with a rubber bladder inside. A cloth lining was added to the leather for support and uniformity. A molded version of the early basketball was invented in 1942. For many years, leather was the material of choice for basketball coverings, however in the late 1990s, synthetic composite materials were put forth and have rapidly gained acceptance in most leagues, although the NBA's game balls still use real leather (outside of a brief experiment with a microfiber ball in 2006 that was not well received).

From 1967 through 1976, the American Basketball Association (ABA) used a distinctive red, white and blue basketball that is still seen from time to time.

Notable basketball manufacturers

Spalding
Spalding-Platinum-ZKPro.jpg Spalding was the first company to produce a basketball for official use. Company founder A. G. Spalding made the first dedicated basketball in the last years of the 19th century at the behest of James Naismith. It has produced basketballs since that time and has produced the NBA’s official game ball since 1983. They also produce the basketballs for the WNBA and NBA Development League. The company also produces a wide variety of balls for the consumer market.

In 2012, it also became official provider for both the Euroleague and Eurocup competitions. [7] It also serves as provider for Liga ACB.

Spalding became the new supplier for NBL Australia in 2010. [8]

Molten
Molten GL7.jpg Molten, a Japanese sporting goods manufacturer, has the current contract to provide game balls for:[ citation needed ]

Until the 2006–07 season, it had provided balls for both Europe-wide competitions organized by Euroleague Basketball, the Euroleague and ULEB Cup (now the Eurocup).[ citation needed ] Molten's top-of-the line product is the GL7, a leather ball with a distinctive 12-panel design. [9]

Wilson
Wilson Solution.jpg Wilson Sporting Goods is the official ball supplier of all NCAA postseason tournaments, most notably the men's and women's Division I tournaments, and is used by many NCAA teams during the season as well by many high school leagues. As of 2015, Wilson also supplies balls for all FIBA-operated 3x3 competitions. [6] Like Spalding, Wilson produces a variety of balls for the consumer market as well. It also formerly was the supplier to the NBA's game ball from 1946 to 1983.
Rawlings
Rawlings TEN.jpg Rawlings has manufactured basketballs since 1902. The company is known for producing a 10-panel ball (known as the TEN), along with traditional 8-panel balls. The TEN basketball is the official ball of the Amateur Athletic Union and the "Gus Macker", the largest 3-on-3 basketball tournament in the United States.[ citation needed ]
Nike
BB9 4005.jpg Nike had the contract to produce balls for the Euroleague Basketball Company (including the Euroleague and the Eurocup) from 2007 [10] until 2012, when it turned to Spalding. In the Philippines the NCAA and UAAP use the Nike 4005 Official Tournament Balls.
Nivia
Nivia Basketball, Top Grip, BB-195, Jan2017.jpg Nivia is based in Jalandhar (Punjab), India and it has been manufacturing basketballs since 1934. It makes hand stitched balls which have been the official balls for many national, international leagues, championship including the All India Football Federation (AIFF). [11]
Others
Other companies that make basketballs include Adidas, Avaro, Baden Sports (official supplier for the Harlem Globetrotters), Dunlop, Kipsta, Mikasa, Mitre to name a few.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one, two or three one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

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Point guard Basketball position

The point guard (PG), also called the one or the point is one of the five positions in a regulation basketball game. A point guard has perhaps the most specialized role of any position. Point guards are expected to run the team's offense by controlling the ball and making sure that it gets to the right player at the right time. Above all, the point guard must understand and accept their coach's game plan; in this way, the position can be compared to a quarterback in American football, a catcher in baseball, or a playmaker in soccer. They must also be able to adapt to what the defense is allowing and must control the pace of the game.

Womens basketball Basketball played by women

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Rules of basketball

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Gus Macker 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament

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History of basketball Account of the history and development of the sport of basketball

The history of basketball began with its invention in 1891 in Springfield, Massachusetts by Canadian physical education instructor James Naismith as a less injury-prone sport than football. Naismith was a 31-year old graduate student when he created the indoor sport to keep athletes indoors during the winters. The game became established fairly quickly and grew very popular as the 20th century progressed, first in America and then in other parts of the world. After basketball became established in American colleges, the professional game followed. The American National Basketball Association (NBA), established in 1946, grew to a multibillion-dollar enterprise by the end of the century, and basketball became an integral part of American culture.

Basketball is a ball game and team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules. Since being developed by James Naismith as a non-contact game that almost anyone can play, basketball has undergone many different rule variations, eventually evolving into the NBA-style game known today. Basketball is one of the most popular and widely viewed sports in the world.

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules. Basketball is one of the most popular and widely viewed sports in the world.

Ball (gridiron football)

In Canada and the United States, a football is a ball, roughly in the form of a prolate spheroid, used in the context of playing gridiron football. Footballs are often made of cow hide leather, as such a material is required in professional and collegiate football. Footballs used in recreation, and in organized youth leagues, may be made of rubber or plastic materials.

References

  1. Zirm, Jordan. "Basketball Sizes: A Quick Guide for All Levels of Play". STACK. Retrieved 2017-05-05.
  2. Putman, Carl (September 11, 2017). "Basketball Official Size & Weight". LiveStrong.com. Retrieved 2018-02-02.
  3. "Sports Gear Lab". Sportsgearlab.com. Retrieved 31 May 2016.
  4. 1 2 3 4 "Basketball Size Chart - Recommended Sizes for Mom & Me". www.breakthroughbasketball.com. Retrieved 2017-05-05.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Official Basketball Rules 2018 - Basketball Equipment - Valid as of 1st October 2018 (working document)" (PDF). FIBA. 1 October 2017. pp. 11–12. Retrieved 31 March 2019.
  6. 1 2 "Wilson to provide the Official Game Ball for FIBA" (Press release). Amer Sports. 9 June 2015. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  7. Spalding becomes global provider for Euroleague Basketball
  8. "Basketball Australia to Play Ball with Spalding Through to 2019". Basketball Australia. August 10, 2016. Retrieved 2018-02-02.
  9. "GL7". Archived from the original on April 19, 2007.
  10. "Euroleague Basketball Announces Partnership with Nike". Euroleague Basketball. 2007-06-28. Archived from the original on 1 July 2007. Retrieved 2007-07-02.
  11. "Nivia Production History".