Bathurst Inlet, Nunavut

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Bathurst Inlet
Qingaut
ᕿᙵᐅᓐ
Settlement [1]
Bathurst Inlet 2.jpg
Bathurst Inlet from the air with the old mission visible
Canada Nunavut location map-lambert proj3.svg
Red pog.svg
Bathurst Inlet
Canada location map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Bathurst Inlet
Coordinates: 66°50′20″N108°02′55″W / 66.83889°N 108.04861°W / 66.83889; -108.04861 [2] Coordinates: 66°50′20″N108°02′55″W / 66.83889°N 108.04861°W / 66.83889; -108.04861 [3]
CountryCanada
Territory Nunavut
Region Kitikmeot
Electoral district Cambridge Bay
Government
  Typen/a
   MLAs Jeannie Ehaloak
Area
[1]
  Total19.1 km2 (7.4 sq mi)
Elevation
0 m (0 ft)
Population
 (2016) [1]
  Total0
Time zone UTC−07:00 (MST)
  Summer (DST) UTC−06:00 (MDT)
Postal code

Bathurst Inlet, (Inuinnaqtun: Qingaut [4] Kingaok, Inuktitut syllabics: ᕿᙵᐅᓐ [5] ), is a small Inuit community located in Bathurst Inlet in the Kitikmeot Region] of Nunavut, Canada.

Contents

The Inuit name for the community is Kingaun (old orthography) or Qingaut (new orthography), meaning nose mountain, which refers to a hill close to the community. Thus, the people of the area are referred to as "Kingaunmiut" (miut - people of). [6]

The traditional language of the area was Inuinnaqtun and is written using the Latin alphabet rather than the syllabics of the Inuktitut writing system. Like Kugluktuk, Cambridge Bay and Umingmaktok syllabics are rarely seen and used mainly by the Government of Nunavut.

Bathurst Inlet is the traditional birthing grounds of a "key northern species", the large, migratory Bathurst herd of barren-ground caribou. Over millennia, the Inuit, First Nations and Métis depended on the Bathurst Inlet herd for survival. [7]

History

The first Europeans known to have visited the area was during the first expedition of John Franklin in 1821. There was little outside contact until 1936 when both the Catholic Church and the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) arrived. [6] Although, the Hudson's Bay Company abandoned the site in 1964 (for Umingmaktok) the Inuit decided to remain in the area and continue the traditional lifestyle.

During the early 1960s, the area was visited by Glen Warner, a sergeant with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Warner, along with his wife Trish, purchased both the mission house and the HBC post which they turned into the "Bathurst Inlet Lodge". It is operated today as a joint venture between the Warners and the Kapolaks, and is open during the short Arctic summer.

The lodge is a popular destination for tourists who wish to see a more traditional type Inuit lifestyle and wildlife such as foxes, seals, barren-ground caribou, Arctic char and muskox. Also in the area is the Wilberforce Falls, the highest waterfall above the Arctic Circle.

Like other communities in Nunavut, the only access is by aircraft. Although most tourists arrive from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, it is possible to charter an aircraft from Cambridge Bay. The community has no local phone service and contact with the outside world is maintained by satellite phone.

Like its sister community Umingmaktok, schooling is provided by flying the students to Cambridge Bay and returning them for Christmas and the summer.

Dr. L.H. Vashon, Dr. Rosalie Garcia, and Dr. Carl Smith visited Bathurst Inlet and the surrounding areas in 1993 to study the Casimir effect.[ citation needed ]

Demographics

Federal census population history of Bathurst Inlet
YearPop.±%
198120    
198616−20.0%
1991 18+12.5%
1996 18+0.0%
2001 5−72.2%
2006 0−100.0%
2011 00.00%
2016 00.00%
2021 00.00%
Source: Statistics Canada
[8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16]

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Bathurst Inlet had a population of 0 living in 0 of its 0 total private dwellings, no change from its 2016 population of 0. With a land area of 13.84 km2 (5.34 sq mi), it had a population density of

Bathurst herd

Bathurst Inlet is the traditional birthing grounds of the migratory Bathurst herd of barren-ground caribou. [17] The herd had experienced a rapid decline from 186,000 animals in 2003 to "approximately 16,000-22,000 animals" in 2015. The herd migrates from the birthing grounds to their winter grounds which extends from southern and central Northwest Territories (NWT). In some years, the herd winters as "far south as northern Saskatchewan." [17] According to Environment and Natural Resources (ENR), "The Bathurst Herd are barren-ground caribou, a key northern species. They have shaped the cultural identity of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples over millennia through mutual relationships built on respect." The Bathurst herd was the lifeblood of the Lutsel K'e Dene First Nation in the N.W.T., but by 2017, they faced "a complete ban on hunting from the Bathurst caribou herd." [18]

Sabina gold and silver project

With hopes of more jobs and the guarantee of state-of-the-art protection for the Bathurst caribou, the Kitikmeot Inuit Association among others, have agreed to the gold mine proposal by Vancouver-based Sabina Gold and Silver in the final hearings. The mine will be open-pit and underground and will be located about 150 km (93 mi) south of Bathurst Inlet. [18] Sabina's Matthew Pickard said, "Our objective is to have no impact on caribou herds as a result of this project." According to the CBC, the "proposed mine lies on the eastern fringe of the Bathurst caribou range and in the midst of the range of the Beverly/Ahiak herd, but does not significantly infringe on the calving or post-calving grounds of either herd." [18]

See also

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The Bathurst Inlet Port and Road Project is a plan to build an all-weather road from Bathurst Inlet in Nunavut to a complex of mines that are approximately equidistant between Bathurst Inlet and Yellowknife, NWT. There are no paved roads between Yellowknife and the mines, so they have relied on shipping supplies to the mines over winter-time ice roads. However, in 2005, there was a particularly warm winter, and the ice roads weren't safe for a long enough period to bring in supplies.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Census Profile, 2016 Census Bathurst Inlet". Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2017-03-04.
  2. "Bathurst Inlet". Geographical Names Data Base . Natural Resources Canada.
  3. "Bathurst Inlet". Geographical Names Data Base . Natural Resources Canada.
  4. "Bathurst Inlet | Qingaut". Archived from the original on 2017-03-23. Retrieved 2017-03-23.
  5. "NIRB 12MN036: Notice of Part 4 Screening for Sabina Gold & Silver Corp.'s "Back River" project proposal" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-03-23. Retrieved 2017-03-23.
  6. 1 2 "Archived copy". Community Profiles. Kitikmeot Inuit Association. nd. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved October 30, 2017.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. Bathurst Herd, Government of the Northwest Territories
  8. "1981 Census of Canada: Census subdivisions in decreasing population order" (PDF). Statistics Canada. May 1992. Retrieved February 1, 2021.
  9. "1986 Census: Population - Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions" (PDF). Statistics Canada. September 1987. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  10. "91 Census: Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions - Population and Dwelling Counts" (PDF). Statistics Canada. April 1992. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  11. "96 Census: A National Overview - Population and Dwelling Counts" (PDF). Statistics Canada. April 1997. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  12. "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada, Provinces and Territories, and Census Subdivisions (Municipalities), 2001 and 1996 Censuses - 100% Data (Nunavut)". Statistics Canada. August 15, 2012. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  13. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data (Nunavut)". Statistics Canada. August 20, 2021. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  14. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Nunavut)". Statistics Canada. July 25, 2021. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  15. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Nunavut)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 1, 2022.
  16. 1 2 "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), Nunavut". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved February 19, 2022.
  17. 1 2 Barren-ground caribou: Bathurst herd, Yellowknife, Environment and Natural Resources (ENR), 2015, retrieved October 30, 2017, The Bathurst Herd are barren-ground caribou, a key northern species. They have shaped the cultural identity of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples over millennia through mutual relationships built on respect.
  18. 1 2 3 Minogue, Sara (June 5, 2017). "'State-of-the-art' caribou protection plans draw broad support for Sabina gold mine: Warm feelings for Back River gold project at round 2 of final hearings in Cambridge Bay". CBC News. Retrieved October 30, 2017.

Further reading