Battle of Burgos

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Battle of Burgos
Part of the Peninsular War
Batalla gamonal.JPG
Battle of Burgos or Gamonal (National Library of Spain)
Date10 November 1808
Location
Gamonal ,near Burgos, Spain
Result French victory
Belligerents
Flag of France.svg French Empire Flag of Spain (1785-1873, 1875-1931).svg  Spain
Commanders and leaders
Jean-Baptiste Bessières Conde de Belveder
Vicente Genaro de Quesada   White flag icon.svg
Fernando María de Alós
Strength
20,000 infantry
4,000 cavalry
9,000 infantry
Casualties and losses
50 killed
150 wounded
2,000 killed, wounded, or captured

The Battle of Burgos, also known as Battle of Gamonal, was fought on November 10, 1808, during the Peninsular War in the village of Gamonal, near Burgos, Spain. A powerful French army under Marshal Bessières overwhelmed and destroyed the outnumbered Spanish troops under General Belveder, opening central Spain to invasion. [1]

Spanish history remembers this battle for the vain gallantry of the Guard and Walloon regiments under Vicente Genaro de Quesada. Forming a rearguard for the shattered Spanish lines, these troops repelled repeated charges by General Lasalle's. The cost was high for the Spaniards, with only 74 of the 307 men in the rearguard surviving.

It is said that Bessières personally returned Quesada's sword and had his wounds treated in the French field hospital [ citation needed ]. These acts of chivalry became increasingly rare as the Peninsular War dragged on.

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References

Coordinates: 42°21′21″N3°40′05″W / 42.3558°N 3.6681°W / 42.3558; -3.6681