Battle of Cadoret

Last updated
Battle of Cadoret
Part of the Breton War of Succession
Date17 June 1345
Location 48°01′08″N2°38′46″W / 48.019°N 2.646°W / 48.019; -2.646 Coordinates: 48°01′08″N2°38′46″W / 48.019°N 2.646°W / 48.019; -2.646
Result Charles of Blois retreat
Belligerents
Armoiries Bretagne - Arms of Brittany.svg House of Montfort
Royal Arms of England (1340-1367).svg Kingdom of England
Armoiries Bretagne - Arms of Brittany.svg House of Blois
Blason France moderne.svg Kingdom of France
Commanders and leaders
Blason Thomas Dagworth.svg Sir Thomas Dagworth Blason Blois-Chatillon.svg Charles of Blois
Strength
about 500 about 300
Casualties and losses
unknown unknown

The Battle of Cadoret took place on the moor of Cadoret near Lanouée (commune of Les Forges) in 1345 as part of the War of Succession of Brittany (1341–1365).

Contents

Context

The battle occurred after the victorious siege of the city of Quimper by Charles of Blois in 1344.

Development

Thomas Dagworth, was en route to Ploërmel through Oust à Cadoret. Opposite, Charles of Blois and his army arrived by the Landes de Cadoret. The two forces engaged and the fight lasted the entire afternoon. Caught under a rain of arrows from Welsh archers, the army of Charles suffered many losses.

Aftermath

The French captains Galois de la Heuse and Péan of Fontenay were made prisoners and Charles abandoned the field.

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