Battle of Changsha (1942)

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Battle of Changsha (1942)
Part of the Second Sino-Japanese War of World War II
Battle of Changsha.jpg
A Chinese soldier mounts his ZB vz. 26 light machine gun at Changsha, January 1942.
Date24 December 1941–15 January 1942
Location
Result Chinese victory
Belligerents
Flag of the Republic of China.svg National Revolutionary Army Flag of Japan.svg Imperial Japanese Army
Naval Ensign of Japan.svg Imperial Japanese Navy
Commanders and leaders
Flag of the Republic of China.svg Xue Yue Flag of Japan.svg Korechika Anami
Strength
300,000 soldiers 120,000 soldiers [1]
600 pieces of artillery [1]
200 aircraft [1]
Casualties and losses
Japanese claim:
28,612 killed
1,065 captured [2]
Japanese claim:
1,591 killed
4,412 wounded [3]

The third Battle of Changsha (24 December 1941 – 15 January 1942) was the first major offensive in China by Imperial Japanese forces following the Japanese attack on the Western Allies.

Empire of Japan Empire in the Asia-Pacific region between 1868–1947

The Empire of Japan was the historical nation-state and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration in 1868 to the enactment of the 1947 constitution of modern Japan.

The offensive was originally intended to prevent Chinese forces from reinforcing the British Commonwealth forces engaged in Hong Kong. With the capture of Hong Kong on 25 December, however, it was decided to continue the offensive against Changsha in order to maximize the blow against the Chinese government. [1]

Commonwealth of Nations Intergovernmental organisation

The Commonwealth of Nations, normally known as the Commonwealth, and historically the British Commonwealth, is a unique political association of 53 member states, nearly all of them former territories of the British Empire. The chief institutions of the organisation are the Commonwealth Secretariat, which focuses on intergovernmental aspects, and the Commonwealth Foundation, which focuses on non-governmental relations between member states.

Battle of Hong Kong One of the first battles of the Pacific campaign of World War II

The Battle of Hong Kong, also known as the Defence of Hong Kong and the Fall of Hong Kong, was one of the first battles of the Pacific War in World War II. On the same morning as the attack on Pearl Harbor, forces of the Empire of Japan attacked the British Crown colony of Hong Kong. The attack was in violation of international law as Japan had not declared war against the British Empire. The Hong Kong garrison consisted of British, Indian and Canadian units besides Chinese soldiers and conscripts from both within and outside Hong Kong.

Changsha Prefecture-level city in Hunan, Peoples Republic of China

Changsha is the capital and most populous city of Hunan province in the south central part of the People's Republic of China. It covers 11,819 km2 (4,563 sq mi) and is bordered by Yueyang and Yiyang to the north, Loudi to the west, Xiangtan and Zhuzhou to the south, Yichun and Pingxiang of Jiangxi province to the east. According to 2010 Census, Changsha has 7,044,118 residents, constituting 10.72% of the province's population. It is part of the Chang-Zhu-Tan city cluster or megalopolis.

The offensive resulted in failure for the Japanese, as Chinese forces were able to lure them into a trap and encircle them. After suffering heavy casualties, Japanese forces were forced to carry out a general retreat. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Hsiung, James Chieh; Levine, Steven I. China's Bitter Victory: The War with Japan, 1937–1945, p. 158
  2. Senshi Shoso, "Hong Kong and Changsha" pp. 665
  3. Japanese Monograph No. 71, Army Operations in China pp. 76.

Coordinates: 28°12′00″N112°58′01″E / 28.2000°N 112.9670°E / 28.2000; 112.9670

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

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