Battle of Fujian

Last updated
Battle of Fujian
DateAugust 1864 – June 1865[ citation needed ]
Location
Result Qing Dynasty victory
Territorial
changes
Qing recover previously lost territories in Fujian
Belligerents
Flag of the Qing Dynasty (1889-1912).svg Qing Dynasty Taiping Heavenly Kingdom Banner.svg Taiping Heavenly Kingdom
Commanders and leaders
Zuo Zongtang Li Shixian
Strength
130,000 Xiang Army 280,000 Taipings
Casualties and losses
unknown unknown

The Battle of Fujian (August 1864 – June 1865) was fought between forces of the Qing Dynasty and rebels from the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom. By October 1864 around 12,000 pro-Taiping forces commanded by the Shi King Li Shixian had captured Jianning, Shaowu, Tingzhou and Zhangzhou. [1] They held the city for several months until surrendering in the next summer. The Qing recovered territories in Fujian previously lost to the rebels.

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References

  1. [Men-at-Arms] Ian Heath, Michael Perry - The Taiping Rebellion 1851–66 (2010, Osprey Publishing)

Coordinates: 25°56′N118°18′E / 25.94°N 118.30°E / 25.94; 118.30