Battle of Jiangnan (1856)

Last updated
First rout of the Jiangnan Battalion
DateLate May, 1856 – early August, 1856 (Determined battle from June 16–20)
Location
Nanjing oudside and Jiangbei (江北), China
Result Taiping victory
Territorial
changes
South eastern China annexed by Taiping Heavenly Kingdom [ clarification needed ]
Belligerents
Flag of the Qing Dynasty (1862-1889).svg Qing Dynasty Taiping Heavenly Kingdom Banner.svg Taiping Heavenly Kingdom
Commanders and leaders
Flag of the Qing Dynasty (1862-1889).svg Imperial Commissioner Xiang Rong
Flag of the Qing Dynasty (1862-1889).svg Second Class Senior General Her Chyun
Flag of the Qing Dynasty (1862-1889).svg Lieutenant General Zhang GuoLiang
Yang Xiuqing
Qin Rigang
Shi Dakai
Li Xiucheng
Strength
80,000 Green Standard Army 460,000 militia forces
Casualties and losses
39,000 killed or wounded
Imperial Commissioner Xiang Rong (suicide)
Governor of Jiangsu Jeer Hungar (吉爾杭阿) KIA by artillery bomb
unknown

The First rout of the Jiangnan Battalion (simplified Chinese :一破江南大营; traditional Chinese :一破江南大營) took place between 1853 and 1856 [1] when the Qing government raised the Green Standard Army to fight against the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom. The action involved Qing forces surrounding the city of Nanking, the capital of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom.

Contents

First rout of the Jiangnan Army Group

After the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom militia successfully occupied Nanking in the southern territory of Jiangnan, within ten days First Class Senior Gen. Xiang Rong, in command of 10,000 Green Standard Army troops, surrounded the walls of the city. The remnants of the former Qing garrison defending Nanjing were barricaded outside city walls inside the Ming Xiaoling Mausoleum.

Alongside Xiang Rong, the Green Standard Army was led by Second Class Senior Gen. Her Chyun and Lt. Gen. Zhang Guoliang. The leaders of the Taiping forces were Shi Dakai, Yang Xiuqing, Qin Rigang(秦日綱) and Li Xiucheng. [2]

The regular Army numbered 80,000 troops and the Taiping Rebellion militia force had 460,000 men.

Outcome

On June 1 the Nanjing army tried to stop Taiping forces but Governor of Jiangsu Jeer Hungar(吉爾杭阿), the Mayor of Nanjing and their entire army of 7,800 were totally wiped out.

The Qing army lost another battle later in the month and the remaining 36,000 troops retreated north. On August 9 Xiang Rong committed suicide by hanging himself, although others claimed he had a fatal overdose of opium due to the pain of his battle wounds in Danyang. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Tucker, Spencer (2017). The Roots and Consequences of Civil Wars and Revolutions: Conflicts That Changed World History. Santa Barbara, California: ProQuest. pp. 225, 228. ISBN   9781440842948.
  2. Wacks, Gabriel (2018). "All Under Heaven: The Royal Court of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 August 2018. Retrieved 30 August 2018.