Battle of Luckau

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Battle of Luckau
Part of the War of the Sixth Coalition
Fruhjahrsfeldzug 1813.png
Battle of Luckau
Date4 June 1813
Location
Result Russo-Prussian victory
Belligerents
Flag of France (1794-1815).svg  France Flag of the Kingdom of Prussia (1803-1892).svg  Prussia
Flag of The Russian Empire 1883.svg  Russia
Commanders and leaders
Flag of France.svg Nicolas Oudinot Flag of the Kingdom of Prussia (1803-1892).svg Friedrich von Bülow
Strength
32,000 15,000
58 guns
Casualties and losses
1,500 killed
800 captured
1 gun captured
800 killed or wounded

The Battle of Luckau was fought at Luckau in Brandenburg on the 4 June 1813 during the War of the Sixth Coalition, part of the Napoleonic Wars. Allied Prussian and Russian forces under General Friedrich Wilhelm Freiherr von Bülow defeated part of a French-Allied corps under Marshal Nicolas Oudinot. This action was the last one until the summer armistice ended in August. Luckau is 70 kilometres (43 mi) south-southeast of Berlin.

Luckau Place in Brandenburg, Germany

Luckau is a city in the district of Dahme-Spreewald in the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany. Known for its beauty, it has been dubbed "the Pearl of Lower Lusatia".

Brandenburg State in Germany

Brandenburg is a state of Germany.

War of the Sixth Coalition Part of the Napoleonic Wars

In the War of the Sixth Coalition, sometimes known in Germany as the War of Liberation, a coalition of Austria, Prussia, Russia, the United Kingdom, Portugal, Sweden, Spain and a number of German States defeated France and drove Napoleon into exile on Elba. After the disastrous French invasion of Russia of 1812, the continental powers joined Russia, the United Kingdom, Portugal and the rebels in Spain who were already at war with France.

Contents

Battle

Oudinot commanded the XII Corps and brought only General of Division Michel Marie Pacthod's 13th Division into action. This unit consisted of two brigades under Generals of Brigade Bernard Pourailly and Antoine Gruyer. Pourailly led the 7th Battalion of the 6th Line Infantry Regiment, the 3rd and 4th Battalions of the 7th Line, the 4th Battalion of the 1st Light, and the 4th Battalion of the 10th Line. Gruyer directed the 2nd, 3rd and 4th Battalions of the 101st Line Infantry Regiment, and the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the 1st Neapolitan Light Infantry Regiment. Also engaged in the fight were two foot artillery batteries and two squadrons each of the Bavarian and Hesse-Darmstatt Chevau-léger Regiments. [1]

The XII Corps of the Grande Armée was the name of a short-lived French military unit that existed during the Napoleonic Wars. The corps was formed in the spring of 1813 and Marshal Nicolas Oudinot was appointed as its commander. The formation included one Bavarian and two French infantry divisions. In the spring campaign the corps was engaged at Lützen, Bautzen, and Luckau. After the summer 1813 armistice, the corps fought at Grossbeeren and Dennewitz. After the latter action, Emperor Napoleon dissolved the corps and assigned its units to other formations. Oudinot found employment as a commander of two divisions of the Young Guard.

Kingdom of Bavaria kingdom in Central Europe between 1806–1918, from January 1871 part of the German Empire

The Kingdom of Bavaria was a German state that succeeded the former Electorate of Bavaria in 1805 and continued to exist until 1918. The Bavarian Elector Maximilian IV Joseph of the House of Wittelsbach became the first King of Bavaria in 1805 as Maximilian I Joseph. The crown would go on being held by the Wittelsbachs until the kingdom came to an end in 1918. Most of Bavaria's present-day borders were established after 1814 with the Treaty of Paris, in which Bavaria ceded Tyrol and Vorarlberg to the Austrian Empire while receiving Aschaffenburg and Würzburg. With the unification of Germany into the German Empire in 1871, the kingdom became a federal state of the new Empire and was second in size, power, and wealth only to the leading state, the Kingdom of Prussia. In 1918, Bavaria became a republic, and the kingdom was thus succeeded by the current Free State of Bavaria.

Grand Duchy of Hesse member state of the German Confederation

The Grand Duchy of Hesse and by Rhine was a grand duchy in western Germany that existed from 1806 to the end of the German Empire in 1918. The grand duchy originally formed on the basis of the Landgraviate of Hesse-Darmstadt in 1806 as the Grand Duchy of Hesse. After the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, it changed its name in 1816 to distinguish itself from the Electorate of Hesse, which had formed from neighboring Hesse-Kassel. Colloquially, the grand duchy continued to be known by its former name of Hesse-Darmstadt. It joined the German Empire in 1871 and became a republic after German defeat in World War I in 1918.

Bülow's force consisted of 16 and a half battalions, 10 squadrons, 1 Cossack Pulk, and 58 guns. His 15,800 men included a Russian brigade led by General-major Harpe and a Prussian brigade commanded by Prince Ludwig von Hesse-Homburg. The Russians and Prussians lost about 800 killed and wounded in the action. The French and their allies suffered 1,500 killed and wounded. In addition, Bülow's soldiers captured 700 men, one cannon, and two ammunition wagons. After the combat, Oudinot withdrew 40 kilometres (25 mi) southwest to Übigau near Dresden. An armistice, which was signed on the 4 June, halted the fighting. [1]

Dresden Place in Saxony, Germany

Dresden is the capital city of Saxony, Germany, on the River Elbe near the Czech border.

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References

  1. 1 2 Smith, 424-425

Bibliography

Digby Smith is a British military historian. The son of a British career soldier, he was born in Hampshire, England, but spent several years in India and Pakistan as a child and youth. As a "boy soldier," he entered training in the British Army at the age of 16. He was later commissioned in the Royal Corps of Signals, and held several postings with the British Army of the Rhine.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.