Battle of Siegburg

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Battle of Siegburg
Part of War of the First Coalition
Schlacht bei Siegburg 1796.JPG
Detail of the 1796 map from Grundsätze der Strategie by Erzherzog Carl von Österreich
Date 1 June 1796
Location
Result French victory
Belligerents
France 1804 Flag of France.svg   France Habsburg Monarchy Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg   Austria
Commanders and leaders
France 1804 Flag of France.svg Obergeneral Jean-Baptiste Kléber Habsburg Monarchy Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg Prince Augustus of Württemberg
Strength
ca. 20.000 ca. 7.000
Casualties and losses
Unknown 2400

The Battle of Siegburg was the first engagement of the French offensive across the River Rhine - that offensive was to become the main campaign of 1796 during the War of the First Coalition. On 30 May 1796 général de division Jean-Baptiste Kléber crossed the river at Düsseldorf with the two divisions commanded by général de division Lefebvre and général de division Colaud. He then moved on Siegburg, where he won the battle on 1 June, thus enabling general Jean-Baptiste Jourdan to bring the bulk of his force across the Rhine at Neuwied.

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