Battle of Wiesloch (1799)

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Battle of Wiesloch (1799)
Part of War of the Second Coalition
Wiesloch in HD.svg
Location of Wiesloch in Baden-Württemberg
Date3 December 1799
Location Wiesloch
Result Austrian victory
Belligerents
Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg  Austrian Empire Flag of France.svg French Republic
Commanders and leaders
Count Anton Sztáray Claude Lecourbe
Strength
5,000 17,000
Casualties and losses
500 (10%) 1,500 (8.82%)

The Battle of Wiesloch (German : Schlacht bei Wiesloch ) occurred on 3 December 1799, during the War of the Second Coalition, part of the French Revolutionary Wars. [1] Lieutenant Field Marshal Anton Count Sztáray de Nagy-Mihaly commanded the far right wing protecting the main Austrian army in Swabia, under the command of Archduke Charles, Duke of Teschen. With the victory at Wiesloch (on 3 December), Sztáray's force drove the French from the right bank of the Rhine and relieved the fortress at Philippsburg.

German language West Germanic language

German is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol (Italy), the German-speaking Community of Belgium, and Liechtenstein. It is also one of the three official languages of Luxembourg and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship in Poland. The languages which are most similar to German are the other members of the West Germanic language branch: Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. There are also strong similarities in vocabulary with Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although those belong to the North Germanic group. German is the second most widely spoken Germanic language, after English.

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Coordinates: 49°17′37″N8°40′20″E / 49.2935°N 8.6721°E / 49.2935; 8.6721

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

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References

  1. "On this day in history, December 3". 2014 Cox Television Tulsa, LLC. Archived from the original on 21 March 2014. Retrieved 21 March 2014.