Beaver Creek, Yukon

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Beaver Creek
BeaverCreekYT.jpg
Restaurant in Beaver Creek, Yukon
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Beaver Creek
Coordinates: 62°22′58″N140°52′47″W / 62.38278°N 140.87972°W / 62.38278; -140.87972 [1] Coordinates: 62°22′58″N140°52′47″W / 62.38278°N 140.87972°W / 62.38278; -140.87972 [2]
CountryCanada
Territory Yukon
Area
[3]
  Land27.14 km2 (10.48 sq mi)
Elevation
[4]
650 m (2,130 ft)
Population
 (2016) [3]
  Total93
  Density3.4/km2 (9/sq mi)
Time zone UTC−07:00 (MST)
Canadian Postal code
Y0B 1A0
Area code 867

Beaver Creek is a community in Yukon, Canada. Located at kilometre 1870.6 (historical mile 1202) of the Alaska Highway, 1  NM (1.9 km; 1.2 mi) southeast of Beaver Creek Airport [4] and close to the Alcan - Beaver Creek Border Crossing, it is Canada's westernmost community. The community's main employers are a Canada Border Services Agency port, the White River First Nation and a number of tourist lodges.

Contents

It is the home of the White River First Nation. The First Nation is made up of Upper Tanana speaking people whose traditional territory extends from the Donjek River into neighbouring Alaska, and Athapaskan Northern Tutchone speaking people whose traditional territories included the lower Stewart River and the area south of the Yukon River on the White and Donjek River drainages. In addition to the Alaska Highway, the community is served by the Beaver Creek Airport.

The CBSA station is the furthest from the border crossing of any Canadian customs station at a distance of 28.6 km (17.8 mi), and at least up to the 1990s, some individuals lived in the "no man's land" in between the border and customs. Prior to 1983, the customs station was located in the middle of the community, with the resulting confusion: individuals driving past without stopping, and locals with a new vehicle not being recognized as they drove by.

Kluane Park and Alaska Highway area Yukon - Kluane Park and Alaska Highway area.png
Kluane Park and Alaska Highway area

Climate

Like most of Yukon, Beaver Creek has a subarctic climate (Dfc), and NRC Plant Hardiness Zone of 0a. [5] It is situated at an elevation of approximately 650 m (2,130 ft). [4] Beaver Creek experiences annual temperature average daily highs of 20 °C (68 °F) in July and average daily lows of −30 °C (−22 °F) in January. [6] Record high temperature was 32.8 °C (91.0 °F) on June 15, 1969 and the lowest was −55.0 °C (−67.0 °F) on January 17, 1971. [6] Beaver Creek has an average annual snowfall of 117.9 cm (46.42 in) and 298.6 mm (11.76 in) of rainfall. [6]

The airstrip at Snag, 25 km (16 mi) east of Beaver Creek, experienced the lowest ever temperature measured in North America (excluding Greenland), −63.0 °C (−81.4 °F) on February 3, 1947. [7]

A wooden Catholic church in Beaver Creek Iglesia catolica, Beaver Creek, Yukon, Canada, 2017-08-25, DD 13.jpg
A wooden Catholic church in Beaver Creek
Climate data for Beaver Creek (Beaver Creek Airport)
Climate ID: 2100160; coordinates 62°24′37″N140°52′03″W / 62.41028°N 140.86750°W / 62.41028; -140.86750 (Beaver Creek Airport) ; elevation: 649 m (2,129 ft); 1981–2010, extremes 1968–present
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high humidex 2.87.18.319.425.536.836.233.025.318.37.212.436.8
Record high °C (°F)4.0
(39.2)
7.0
(44.6)
10.0
(50.0)
22.0
(71.6)
29.0
(84.2)
32.8
(91.0)
31.5
(88.7)
31.1
(88.0)
26.5
(79.7)
20.5
(68.9)
7.8
(46.0)
14.0
(57.2)
32.8
(91.0)
Average high °C (°F)−20.4
(−4.7)
−13.1
(8.4)
−3.5
(25.7)
6.2
(43.2)
13.4
(56.1)
19.1
(66.4)
20.3
(68.5)
17.9
(64.2)
10.9
(51.6)
−0.9
(30.4)
−14.2
(6.4)
−19.0
(−2.2)
1.4
(34.5)
Daily mean °C (°F)−25.2
(−13.4)
−19.9
(−3.8)
−12.3
(9.9)
−1.3
(29.7)
6.6
(43.9)
12.4
(54.3)
14.1
(57.4)
11.3
(52.3)
4.6
(40.3)
−6.2
(20.8)
−19.0
(−2.2)
−23.6
(−10.5)
−4.9
(23.2)
Average low °C (°F)−30.0
(−22.0)
−26.7
(−16.1)
−21.1
(−6.0)
−8.7
(16.3)
−0.2
(31.6)
5.6
(42.1)
7.8
(46.0)
4.7
(40.5)
−1.7
(28.9)
−11.5
(11.3)
−23.9
(−11.0)
−28.3
(−18.9)
−11.2
(11.8)
Record low °C (°F)−55.0
(−67.0)
−52.0
(−61.6)
−48.0
(−54.4)
−35.0
(−31.0)
−13.5
(7.7)
−7.0
(19.4)
−2.0
(28.4)
−6.7
(19.9)
−26.0
(−14.8)
−37.2
(−35.0)
−46.5
(−51.7)
−52.8
(−63.0)
−55.0
(−67.0)
Record low wind chill −60.4−56.4−54.6−34.6−13.3−4.8−2.3−5.3−20.2−39.8−47.6−59.7−60.4
Average precipitation mm (inches)13.9
(0.55)
13.9
(0.55)
12.9
(0.51)
8.8
(0.35)
39.7
(1.56)
72.0
(2.83)
101.3
(3.99)
57.1
(2.25)
36.9
(1.45)
28.1
(1.11)
19.2
(0.76)
13.5
(0.53)
417.3
(16.43)
Average rainfall mm (inches)0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
1.4
(0.06)
35.6
(1.40)
72.0
(2.83)
101.3
(3.99)
56.7
(2.23)
27.8
(1.09)
4.0
(0.16)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
298.6
(11.76)
Average snowfall cm (inches)13.9
(5.5)
13.9
(5.5)
12.9
(5.1)
7.5
(3.0)
4.1
(1.6)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.4
(0.2)
9.1
(3.6)
24.1
(9.5)
19.2
(7.6)
12.8
(5.0)
117.9
(46.4)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm)6.25.14.93.09.613.717.513.29.79.78.15.7106.4
Average rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm)0.00.00.00.58.113.717.513.28.01.40.00.062.4
Average snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm)6.25.14.92.51.20.00.00.11.98.28.15.743.9
Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010 [6]

Demographics

Federal census population history of Beaver Creek
YearPop.±%
198190    
1986113+25.6%
1991 104−8.0%
1996 131+26.0%
2001 88−32.8%
2006 112+27.3%
2011 103−8.0%
2016 93−9.7%
2021 78−16.1%
Source: Statistics Canada
[8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [3] [13] [14]

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Beaver Creek had a population of 78 living in 40 of its 61 total private dwellings, a change of

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References

  1. "Beaver Creek". Geographical Names Data Base . Natural Resources Canada.
  2. "Beaver Creek". Geographical Names Data Base . Natural Resources Canada.
  3. 1 2 3 "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Yukon)". Statistics Canada. July 25, 2021. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  4. 1 2 3 Canada Flight Supplement. Effective 0901 Z 16 July 2020 to 0901Z 10 September 2020.
  5. "Plant Hardiness Zone by Municipality". Natural Resources Canada. Government of Canada. Retrieved August 15, 2016.
  6. 1 2 3 4 "Canadian Climate Normals 1981-2010 Station Data - Beaver Creek A". Environment Canada. Archived from the original on September 15, 2019. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  7. "WMO Region 4 (North America): Lowest Temperature". Arizona State University. Archived from the original on March 16, 2015. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  8. "1986 Census: Population - Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions" (PDF). Statistics Canada. September 1987. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  9. "91 Census: Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions - Population and Dwelling Counts" (PDF). Statistics Canada. April 1992. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  10. "96 Census: A National Overview - Population and Dwelling Counts" (PDF). Statistics Canada. April 1997. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  11. "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada, Provinces and Territories, and Census Subdivisions (Municipalities), 2001 and 1996 Censuses - 100% Data (Yukon Territory)". Statistics Canada. August 15, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  12. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data (Yukon Territory)". Statistics Canada. August 20, 2021. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  13. "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Yukon)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  14. 1 2 "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), Yukon". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved February 18, 2022.