Behind the Facade

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Behind the Facade
Behind the Facade.jpg
Directed by Georges Lacombe
Yves Mirande
Written by
Produced by Arys Nissotti
Pierre O'Connell
Starring
Cinematography Victor Arménise
Robert Juillard
Edited by Marthe Poncin
Music by André Gailhard
Production
company
Régina Films
Distributed byRegina Distribution (France)
ENIC (Italy)
Release date
  • 14 March 1939 (1939-03-14)
Running time
85 minutes
CountryFrance
Language French

Behind the Facade (French: Derrière la façade) is a 1939 French drama film directed by Georges Lacombe and Yves Mirande and starring Lucien Baroux, Jules Berry and André Lefaur. [1] The film's sets were designed by the art director Lucien Aguettand. It was shot at the Epinay Studios in Paris.

Contents

Synopsis

When the owner of an apartment block is found murdered, two policeman investigate the lives of the various tenants who live there.

Cast

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References

  1. Aitken p.511

Bibliography