Belgian railway line 36

Last updated
Belgian railway line 36
Thalys plan incline Liege 2006.jpg
A Thalys train on line 36 in 2006
Overview
StatusOperational
LocaleBelgium
Termini Brussels-North railway station
Liège-Guillemins railway station
Service
Operator(s) National Railway Company of Belgium
History
Opened1837-1866
Technical
Line length100 km (62 mi)
Number of tracks double track
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
Electrification 3 kV DC
Route map

Spoorlijn36.png

BSicon CONTg.svg
Line from Brussels-South
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0.0 Brussels-North
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BSicon STR.svg
Line from Namur
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BSicon KRZlr+lr.svg
BSicon CONTfq.svg
Line to Ghent
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2.4 Schaarbeek
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BSicon CONTfq.svg
Line to Antwerp
BSicon LSTR.svg
BSicon HST.svg
5.5 Haren-Zuid
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BSicon KRZu+lr.svg
BSicon CONTfq.svg
Line HalleVilvoorde
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7.0 Diegem
BSicon HST.svg
9.4 Zaventem
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BSicon CONTfq.svg
to Brussels Airport
BSicon LSTR.svg
BSicon HST.svg
12.0 Nossegem
BSicon HST.svg
14.7 Kortenberg
BSicon HST.svg
17.8 Erps-Kwerps
BSicon HST.svg
21.1 Veltem
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24.0 Herent
BSicon ABZgl.svg
BSicon CONTfq.svg
to Aarschot
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BSicon CONTfq.svg
from Mechelen
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BSicon CONTfq.svg
from Aarschot
BSicon BHF.svg
28.8 Leuven
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BSicon ABZgr.svg
to Ottignies
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BSicon ABZgr.svg
HSL 2 to Liège
BSicon LSTR.svg
BSicon HST.svg
40.0 Vertrijk
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47.4 Tienen
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53.8 Ezemaal
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57.0 Neerwinden
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60.7 Landen
BSicon ABZgl.svg
BSicon CONTfq.svg
to Hasselt
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BSicon HST.svg
74.5 Waremme
BSicon HST.svg
77.2 Bleret
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79.8 Remicourt
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83.2 Momalle
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85.4 Fexhe-le-Haut-Clocher
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87.8 Voroux-Goreux
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BSicon ABZgr.svg
freight line to Angleur
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89.9 Bierset-Awans
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BSicon CONTfq.svg
HSL 2 from Leuven
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93.4 Ans
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BSicon CONTfq.svg
from Tongeren
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99.9 Liège-Guillemins
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BSicon ABZgr.svg
Line to Namur
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River Meuse
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BSicon KRZlr+lr.svg
BSicon STR+r.svg
to Seraing
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BSicon CONTf.svg
Line to Maastricht
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Line to Aachen

The Belgian railway line 36 is a railway line in Belgium connecting Brussels to Liège. Completed in 1866, the line runs 99.3 km. [1] Trains running between Brussels and Aachen in Germany use the line as far as Liège, and then line 37 between Liège and the German border, the last stop in Belgium being Welkenraedt. [2]

Between Schaarbeek and Leuven, the line is 4-track; the outer tracks serve local trains with many stops, while the central tracks carry intercity and high-speed trains; these are called L36N, and branch off after Leuven onto a separate route that mostly follows the E5 motorway towards Liege. The Diabolo project connects L36 to the station under Brussels Airport.

The following stations are located on the line:

Inclined Planes of Liège

Between Ans and Liège the railway line has to descend 358 feet within less than 5 miles. This steep incline was initially negotiated with the help of a fixed engine driving an endless rope that was used to haul the trains without the help of a locomotive [3] . After the late 1860s, special banking locomotives were used and the fixed engine was discarded. Another line (line 36A) was built to bypass the incline but this line is only used by freight trains [4] .

When line 36 was electrified in 1955, most of the trains still needed a banking engine. Currently, some trains are powerful enough to climb the incline without a helper and the rest are provided with two locomotives. The rear engine is no longer removed at Ans in order to save time.

Related Research Articles

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Bank engine Locomotive used to assist trains up steep inclines

A bank engine, banking engine, helper engine or pusher engine is a railway locomotive that temporarily assists a train that requires additional power or traction to climb a gradient. Helpers/bankers are most commonly found in mountain divisions, where the ruling grade may demand the use of substantially greater motive power than that required for other grades within the division.

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HSL 2 Belgian high-speed rail line

The HSL 2 is a Belgian high-speed rail line between Leuven and Ans and is 66.2 km (41 mi) long, all of it on dedicated high-speed tracks, which began service on 15 December 2002. As part of the Belgian railway network, it is owned, technically operated and maintained by Infrabel.

HSL 3 railway line in Belgium

The HSL 3 is a Belgian high-speed rail line. It connects Liège to the German border near Aachen. The high-speed track length is 42 km (26 mi).

High-speed rail in Belgium

Belgium's high-speed rail network provides mostly international connections from Brussels to France, Germany and The Netherlands. The high-speed network began with the opening of the HSL 1 to France in 1997, and since then high-speed lines have been extended towards Germany with HSL 2 in 2002, HSL 3 from Liège to the German border in 2009, and HSL 4 from Antwerp to the Dutch border in 2009.

Belgian Railways Class 23 class of 83 Belgian electric locomotives

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Liège-Guillemins railway station railway station in Belgium

Liège-Guillemins railway station is the main station of the city of Liège, the third largest city in Belgium. It is one of the most important hubs in the country and is one of the 3 Belgian stations on the high-speed rail network. The station is used by 15,000 people every day which makes it the eleventh busiest station in Belgium and the third in Wallonia.

Brussels-North railway station railway station in Belgium

Brussels-North is one of the three major railway stations in Brussels (Belgium); the other two are Brussels-Central and Brussels-South. The station's bilingual French–Dutch name is generally translated to Brussels-North. Every regular domestic and international train passing there has a planned stop. The station has 200,000 passengers per week, mainly commuters.

Brussels National Airport railway station railway station in Belgium

Brussels Airport - Zaventem is a railway station located beneath Brussels Airport, Flemish Brabant, Belgium. The station opened in 1958 on Line 36C; in 2012, the new Line 25N was added. The train services are operated by National Railway Company of Belgium (NMBS/SNCB).

Belgian railway line 25 railway line in Belgium

The Belgian railway line 25 is the oldest railway line in Belgium. It connects the main two cities in Belgium: Brussels and Antwerp. The section between Brussels and Mechelen was completed in on May 5, 1835 and was the first railroad in Belgium. On May 3, 1836, the second section was opened. It was extended to Luchtbal in the north of Antwerp in 2007 in order to shorten the route from Amsterdam to Brussels. The total line runs 47.6 km.

Leuven railway station railway station in Belgium

Leuven is the main railway station in the Belgian city of Leuven, in Flemish Brabant. The station is operated by the national railway company NMBS and is located on railway line 36.

Belgian railway line 37 railway line in Belgium with minor part in Germany

The Belgian railway line 37 is a railway line in Belgium connecting Liège to Aachen in Germany. Completed in 1843, the line runs 47.4 km in Belgium. and another 6.8 km in Germany. It is the first and oldest crossborder Railwayline worldwide. Since 2009, high speed trains running between Brussels and Aachen use the HSL 3 instead of the line 37 between Chênée and Hergenrath.

Belgian railway line 162 railway line in Belgium

The Belgian railway line 162 is a railway line in Belgium connecting Namur to the Luxembourg border at Sterpenich (Arlon). Completed in 1859, the line runs 146.8 km. Together with the Belgian railway line 161 and the CFL Line 50, it forms the important rail link between Brussels and Luxembourg.

Belgian railway line 125 railway line in Belgium

The Belgian railway line 125 is a railway line in Belgium connecting Liège and Namur. Completed in 1851, the line runs 59.5 km. It runs along the northern (left) bank of the river Meuse.

Belgian railway line 130 railway line in Belgium

The Belgian railway line 130 is a railway line in Belgium connecting Namur and Charleroi. Completed in 1843, the line runs 36.6 km. It runs along the river Sambre, crossing it several times.

Oostende railway station railway station in Belgium

Oostende railway station is located in Ostend in West Flanders, Belgium. The first station in Ostend was opened in 1838 during the reign of Leopold I of Belgium on the former Belgian railway line 62 to Torhout and is now a supermarket. The NMBS station was opened in 1913 during the reign of Albert I of Belgium. The station is designed to connect trains and ferries and is built with Scottish Granite, Bluestone from Soignes and Limestone from Euville. It is constructed in a classical style of architecture inspired by the French architect from the 18th Century François Mansart and the Louis XVI of France style.

Ottignies railway station railway station in Belgium

Ottignies railway station is located in Ottignies, part of the city of Ottignies-Louvain-la-Neuve, in the province Walloon Brabant in the Walloon region of Belgium.

References

  1. "Ligne 36: Bruxelles-Nord - Liège-Guillemins". BelRail.be.
  2. "Ligne 37: Liège-Guillemins - Hergenrath - (D)". BelRail.be.
  3. The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal: Exhibiting a View of the Progressive Discoveries and Improvements in the Sciences and the Arts. A. and C. Black. 1845.
  4. "Les plans inclinés de Liège - Rixke Rail's Archives". rixke.tassignon.be (in French). Retrieved 2018-11-08.