Benjamín G. Hill

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Benjamín G. Hill
Benjamin Hill.JPG
Born(1874-03-31)31 March 1874
Choix, Sinaloa
Died14 December 1920(1920-12-14) (aged 46)
Mexico City
Allegiance Constitutionalist Army, Mexican Army
Years of service1910 1920
Rank General
Battles/wars Mexican Revolution
Other work Governor of Sonora, Secretary of National Defence

Gen. Benjamín Hill (born 31 March 1874, Choix, Sinaloa, died 14 December 1920, Mexico City) was a military commander during the Mexican Revolution.

Choix Place in Sinaloa, Mexico

Choix is a small city in the Mexican state of Sinaloa. It stands at 26°42′33″N108°19′19″W. The city reported 9,305 inhabitants in the 2010 census.

Sinaloa State of Mexico

Sinaloa, officially the Free and Sovereign State of Sinaloa, is one of the 31 states which, with the Federal District, compose the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico. It is divided into 18 municipalities and its capital city is Culiacán Rosales.

Mexico City Capital in Mexico

Mexico City, or the City of Mexico, is the capital of Mexico and the most populous city in North America. Mexico City is one of the most important cultural and financial centres in the Americas. It is located in the Valley of Mexico, a large valley in the high plateaus in the center of Mexico, at an altitude of 2,240 meters (7,350 ft). The city has 16 boroughs.

Career

Following the call of Francisco I. Madero he joined the revolution in 1910. He was briefly imprisoned in the city of Hermosillo, Sonora, during 1911. Following his release, he took up arms and raised a volunteer army that took Navojoa and was marching on Álamos when the Treaty of Ciudad Juárez was signed.

Francisco I. Madero Mexican revolutionary leader and president

Francisco Ignacio Madero González was a Mexican revolutionary, writer and statesman who served as the 33rd president of Mexico from 1911 until shortly before his assassination in 1913. He was an advocate for social justice and democracy. Madero was notable for challenging Mexican President Porfirio Díaz for the presidency in 1910 and being instrumental in sparking the Mexican Revolution.

Navojoa City in Sonora, Mexico

Navojoa is the fifth-largest city in the northern Mexican state of Sonora and is situated in the southern part of the state. The city is the administrative seat of Navojoa Municipality, located in the Mayo River Valley.

Álamos Place in Sonora, Mexico

Álamos (Spanish['alamos]  is a town in Álamos Municipality in the Mexican state of Sonora, in northwestern Mexico.

In 1912 he fought against the rebellion led by Pascual Orozco and, following the 1913 coup d'état of Victoriano Huerta, he joined the northwestern corps of the Constitutionalist Army, which would ultimately be commanded by Gen. Álvaro Obregón, alongside whom he fought in the campaigns against Francisco "Pancho" Villa in the Bajío. He served as Governor of Sonora from August 1914 until January 1915.

Pascual Orozco Mexican general and politician

Pascual Orozco Vázquez was a Mexican revolutionary leader who rose up with Francisco I. Madero late 1910 to depose Porfirio Díaz. Sixteen months later he revolted against the Madero government and ultimately sided with the coup d'état that deposed Madero.

Coup détat Sudden deposition of a government

A coup d'état, also known as a putsch, a golpe, or simply as a coup, means the overthrow of an existing government; typically, this refers to an illegal, unconstitutional seizure of power by a dictator, the military, or a political faction.

Victoriano Huerta Mexican military officer and 35th President of Mexico

José Victoriano Huerta Márquez was a Mexican military officer and 35th President of Mexico.

Following the victory of Venustiano Carranza he was promoted to Divisional General. In 1920 he was one of the main proponents of the Plan of Agua Prieta, fighting in the military rebellions that ensued. When Obregón assumed the presidency on 1 December 1920, he appointed Hill as his Secretary of War and the Navy. He was seen as a potential presidential successor to Obregón, which brought him into conflict with Interior Secretary Plutarco Elías Calles. A few days after his appointment.

Venustiano Carranza Mexican politician and president of Mexico

Venustiano Carranza Garza was one of the main leaders of the Mexican Revolution, whose victorious northern revolutionary Constitutionalist Army defeated the counter-revolutionary regime of Victoriano Huerta and then defeated fellow revolutionaries after Huerta's ouster. He secured power in Mexico, serving as head of state from 1915–1917. With the promulgation of a new revolutionary Mexican Constitution of 1917, he was elected president, serving from 1917 to 1920.

Plan of Agua Prieta

The Plan of Agua Prieta was a manifesto, or plan, drawn up by three revolutionary generals of the Mexican Revolution, declaring themselves in revolt against the government of President Venustiano Carranza. It was proclaimed by Obregón on 22 April 1920, in English and 23 April in Spanish in the northern border city of Agua Prieta, Sonora.

President of Mexico Head of state of the country of Mexico

The President of Mexico, officially known as the President of the United Mexican States, is the head of state and government of Mexico. Under the Constitution, the president is also the Supreme Commander of the Mexican armed forces. The current President is Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who took office on December 1, 2018.

Death and legacy

in 1920, Hill died at age 46 under suspicious circumstances after attending a luncheon; poisoning, at the hands of Calles, has often been suspected.

The town of Benjamín Hill, Sonora, was named in his honour.

Benjamín Hill, Sonora Place in Sonora, Mexico

Benjamín Hill is the municipal seat of Benjamín Hill Municipality in the Mexican state of Sonora.

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