Benjamin H. Kline

Last updated
Benjamin H. Kline
Born
Benjamin Harrison Kline

(1894-07-11)July 11, 1894
DiedJanuary 7, 1974(1974-01-07) (aged 79)
Resting place Hollywood Forever Cemetery
Other namesBen Kline
Ben H. Kline
Benjamin Kline
Occupation Cinematographer
Film director
Years active1920–1972

Benjamin Harrison Kline (July 11, 1894 – January 7, 1974) was an American cinematographer and film director. He was the father of Richard H. Kline.

Contents

Biography

Kline was born in Birmingham, Alabama and started his career as a cinematographer in 1920 with Universal Pictures' Red Lane. Over his career he shot about 350 films and television shows, a number that includes many serials and a large number of Three Stooges short subjects for Columbia Pictures. He worked up through about 1972. His son Richard H. Kline was also a noted cinematographer. Kline also directed eight films during the period of 1931–1945. [1]

Partial filmography

As director

Kline directed seven films, one Rin Tin Tin serial and six westerns:

Sources also suggest that Kline replaced B. Reeves Eason as uncredited director of the serial The Galloping Ghost in 1931.

As cinematographer

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References

  1. Reid, John Howard (31 October 2006). Great Hollywood Westerns: Classic Pictures, Must-See Movies and 'b' Films. Lulu.com. pp. 137–. ISBN   978-1-4303-0968-0 . Retrieved 25 November 2012.